Hot answers tagged

23

Yes. That is to say it will definitely affect flavor, but how it affects the flavor is ultimately dependent upon the specific mineral compounds found in your hard water vs. other hard waters and soft water's lack of these compounds. Here's the key: Some of the compounds in hard water are "sticky," glomming onto certain compounds in coffee when they meet ...


20

There are a lot of factors that contribute to the bitterness of coffee. Some of these have to do with the concentration of various compounds in the coffee and the roasting process, but the way you brew the coffee can make a big difference as well. Assuming that you are not going to be harvesting and roasting your own coffee, we can focus on the brewing ...


20

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. I will use a lot of graphs, because a picture is worth a thousand words but a graph can communicate a concept, to dispel a lot of the myths about acidity in coffee....


18

There are several approaches that can aid in developing your palate. Cupping The preferred method of tasting coffee. This requires only a cupping bowl and spoon. Dose out coffee, pour in the hot water evenly, and at 4 minutes skim off the top to remove the crust while carefully not disturbing what has settled at the bottom. Wait about 12-14 minutes for the ...


16

Cold brew it! Make sure you start with very cold water and a coarse grind. Cold-temp chemistry has a better chance of taking what's good and leaving what's bad.


14

Burn? I've heard that some large chains "burn" their beans while roasting :-) But not while brewing. A major coffee chain, seen on almost every other corner in some places, is known for their very dark, "burnt" roast. Many people like this sharp taste and associate it with caffeine and their morning pick-me up. Other people find this "burnt" roast to be ...


14

The main reason for different grinds is the different brewing processes. If the water is exposed to the grounds for a very short amount of time (e.g., 10-15 seconds for espresso), you need a finer grind to provide enough surface area to extract the coffee from the beans. If the brewing time is long (e.g., the ~4 minutes of french press), you need a coarse ...


14

Although coffee generally becomes staler with time, heating coffee up in the microwave does not produce any harmful chemicals - as long as the container you are microwaving it in is microwave-safe. The microwaves emitted inside the microwave are a relatively safe form of radiation that cause the water molecules in the coffee to move faster, thus creating ...


13

Sumatran coffees (and others from the Asia/Pacific region, like Java and Arabia) are uniformly low-acid. As @Chris said, the processing methods and roast have a lot to do with it. Coffees that have been dry- (or "natural" processed) are lower in acids than washed-process coffees. Often, acidic coffee is described as being "bright" (e.g., Starbucks Colombia)....


13

Here's a few thoughts based on what causes sourness/acidity in coffee and ways to temper it. Order an espresso lungo. Sourness (acidity) is characteristic of the "stuff" that is extracted relatively early in the brewing process. In other brewing methods that take longer to perform (e.g., coffee press, drip, or pour-over) this can be balanced by the more ...


13

If you're wanting ideas that don't include brewing, I would suggest using the coffee grounds as a steak rub or placing the coffee in a compost pile (if you have one). Also, there are a number of coffee desserts that are sweet enough to hide the taste of bad coffee. I would suggest giving those a try. Some examples would be a mocha fondue, java pie, or ...


12

The easiest step would be to swap out the Maxwell House coffee for something of higher quality. If there are local roasters nearby, check to see if they do wholesale or bulk orders, and then order some 5lb. bags of coffee from them. Since the idea is to keep costs low, they should be able to grind it for you ahead of time so that you won't have to add the ...


12

The biggest chemical change that is going to occur is going to be oxidation. Oxidation Chemically, oxidation is defined as the following from this source. Oxidation is any reaction in which one or more electrons are moved from one chemical to another, producing two different compounds. Specifically related to coffee, oxidation is further elaborated ...


12

I think it is a combination of old stale grounds sitting on a burner for long hours. The places you mention are generally open 24/7 or something close to it and have people ordering coffee at all times of day, so it's all made ahead of time and kept warm all day. The cheapest coffee suppliers usually mix beans from all over the place and they all store them ...


12

Both cup material and temperature are in play here, I think. A big part of the coffee taste (and experience as a whole) is the aroma. I personally find that paper cups (not surprisingly) smell and taste like paper. Ceramic (or glass, porcelain, etc.) should be practically neutral. Any smell you get from the cup could affect the perception of taste of the ...


11

Short answer: Yes - up to a point Long answer: Ignoring things like Kopi Luwak etc, there is a cost associated with growing, harvesting and transporting arabica beans in a timely manner, roasting them while they're fresh, and getting them to somewhere you can buy them. If you go below this price, corners will be cut. You may get cheaper robusta beans, or ...


11

I've had this on the farm where it was harvested, and was able to verify for myself that wild, happy civets were left to their own selection process and merely followed around by farmers eager to find the drops. It's not unlike any other Arabica bean. What I had was single-source, but that's rarer - farms doing it correctly don't produce a lot, so packagers ...


11

Adding coffee grounds to a planting medium (e.g. soil) adds fatty acids, essential oils and nutrients that enrich soil which can help the growth of the plant and it may also affect the colour. One thing to be careful of is that some coffee grounds increase the acidity of the soil. However, I can't find anything indicating that it will affect the flavour of ...


11

Let's take a look at what turns coffee grounds and water into coffee: It's an extraction process where aromatic compounds and oils and caffeine are extracted from the coffee bean into the water. It's a "standard chemical process", done in millions of kitchens and cafés all over the world. Basic chemistry will tell you that the temperature of the solvent ...


10

I had some Kopi Luwak, in Indonesia. I've read a number of reviews. It's been hard to find blind tastings by coffee experts. Basically, it doesn't seem like anything special. If anything, it kind of tastes bad. Now, there may be more to the story. Indonesians I know have offered two explanations for why I was unimpressed. And these excuses were not mutually ...


10

4M is a term mainly used among Italians for espresso. It is a placeholder for four words that start with "M" in Italian that affects espresso preparation. Some information can be found here. These M's are: Miscela: The coffee-blend; it covers the selection and blending of the beans as well as proper roasting. Macinazione: The grinder; proper grinding of ...


10

To answer this shortly, no there is no coffee that has no bitterness. Bitterness in coffee is determined by different factors on which I will elaborate a bit now. First of all there are bitter substances naturally in coffee. The most obvious and widely known one would be caffein. However in truth only around 15% of the bitterness in coffee comes from ...


9

Bitterness comes from over-extracting coffee. Over-extraction is mainly caused by: 1) brewing for too long: In the beginning of the brewing stage acidic flavors are first extracted, followed by sweetness. And towards the end of the brew, only bitter flavors are extracted. The trick is to stop the brewing just after all the sweetness is extracted. From ...


9

Coffee beans - I mean the type of coffee you actually drip. Exchange the coffee for 100% arabica coffee. it does not have to be even single source coffee. Good start for decent cup of coffee is ... You bet, it is Starbucks. While I personally am in movement away from Starbucks, it should be good choice for decent cup of coffee for reasonable price


9

You're actually asking two different questions. The minute amount of coffee left to evaporate in the bottom of a cup will have completely oxidized and lost virtually all of its volatile compounds (i.e. It probably wouldn't taste very good if you reconstituted it on its own). So when you add more fresh coffee to that cup, yes, you are essentially adding a ...


9

If you drink alcohol, you could also try making Kahlúa. Soak coffee beans and vanilla beans in vodka for a while (3-4 weeks), then mix with a simple syrup. There are plenty of detailed recipes on the web for it.


8

Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by ...


8

I find that most of the Brazil dry processed coffee I get is very smooth or "low acid". However, in general coffees that are darker roasted will have less acid as the acids are destroyed in the roasting process. You may look at the description as well. Many of the fruit notes that some coffees advertise are coming from acid compounds that may overall ...


8

That sounds like the generalization that drip or pour over brewing is better for light roasts and stronger brewing methods are better for darker roasts. I'll counter that by saying that I often use my Aeropress for lighter roasts and my Clever Dripper for dark roasts and those cups come out just fine. The Aeropress makes a sort of quasi-espresso cup ...


8

I've had coffee that tasted burnt in a lot of cheaper restaurants and from common coffeemakers in homes. It's uniformly been stuff that's sat on a warmer for a long time (like, an hour or more) after brewing. Keeping coffee on heat after brewing "cooks" it down, just as keeping a soup or sauce on a simmer reduces it. However, it has the opposite effect on ...


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