15

tl;dr: Permanent filters win on cost over time. Paper filters win on performance, clean-up, and health. Flavour is personal preference. Composting paper filters and spent grounds alleviates most of the environmental benefit of permanent filter. My conclusion: paper filters, discarded into a compost pile, win hands down. Use of permanent versus one-time-use ...


13

By having a thin spout, you can more finely control the flow rate and where the water lands. When making pour-over coffee, you want to control the water level in the cone to control the brew time and evenly extract coffee. Also, water needs to be poured carefully onto the middle of the cone so that the water doesn't run down the side of the cone without ...


12

The easiest step would be to swap out the Maxwell House coffee for something of higher quality. If there are local roasters nearby, check to see if they do wholesale or bulk orders, and then order some 5lb. bags of coffee from them. Since the idea is to keep costs low, they should be able to grind it for you ahead of time so that you won't have to add the ...


11

The gases themselves are largely composed of CO2 and moisture trapped in the grinds. My understanding is that releasing the gases ahead of time prevent the gasses from interfering with an even extraction throughout the brewing process. As when brewing coffee, we're trying to expose the grounds evenly to the hot water, the release of gas fights against this, ...


11

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. Lets use some of our 9,000+ full sensory reviews to examine the difference between Paper Filter Pour-over coffees and the Nel. TL;DR: Nel takes a ton of work to ...


10

There are many difference between the two filters. In this website. it states that: Today, most white paper filters are whitened with oxygen. Oxygen whitening is much more friendly to the environment, and imparts no taste to the filter. Brown filters are simply unwhitened. Your choice, but oxygen whitened filters are usually less expensive. Brown filters ...


10

This is a pretty good way to ruin a burr grinder. Worst case scenario, your burrs jam up so much that they can't spin and burn out your motor. A blade could help, but I'd argue that the inconsistent grind you'd get wouldn't be much of an improvement in cup quality anyway. Realistically you'd end up with some of your grinds unchanged, some at the size you ...


9

Coffee beans - I mean the type of coffee you actually drip. Exchange the coffee for 100% arabica coffee. it does not have to be even single source coffee. Good start for decent cup of coffee is ... You bet, it is Starbucks. While I personally am in movement away from Starbucks, it should be good choice for decent cup of coffee for reasonable price


9

Do not blame the coffee makers for what has akways been an ambiguous meassure - or rather, not a unit for meassuring at all. Only in some areas of the world a "cup" has evolved into a fixed unit. First and foremost, a cup is a drinking vessel for usually hot beverages and usually with a handle. How big a cup is, is primarily a cultural thing. To showcase ...


7

If you could be more specific with your question it would be easier to answer. For example was your previous "pot" a percolator or automatic coffee maker or what? By the same token, what is your current set up? By a process of elimination you should be able to isolate the factor that's causing your coffee to taste sh***ty. Basically those are: The ...


7

I did a little bit of research at the site of inventor of the coffee filter. It's Melitta from Germany. In the german FAQ I found the following: Warum falte ich Filterpapier vor dem Einlegen um? Damit die Kaffeezubereitung optimal funktioniert, muss das Filterpapier genau in die Form des Filters gebracht werden. Dies geschieht, indem Sie die ...


7

In general consistency is more important than a specific setting. The key is that you can actually control both the size of the grind and actually achieve a homogenous grind allowing you to increase the consistency in the coffee when you brew it as you can assertively control the service area being exposed during the brewing process. Since you stated that ...


7

The exact liquid measurement of a "cup" as noted on the side of a coffee maker is subjective since there is no industry wide standard unit of measure. Lee Denny explains this in his article: One thing is for sure: a "cup" of coffee does not fill up the typical 12 oz. coffee mug found in most American homes. Ounces per Cup in Popular Coffee Maker ...


6

According to this site it's a by product of the roasting phase and occurs naturally hence the reason coffee bags have a degassing hole. When you grind the coffee the trapped gases are released and when the hot water hits it, this releases the gases quicker. Factors aside from storage that can affect this phenomenon are: Temperatures that the beans ...


6

In cooking in general weighting dry ingredients would be much more precise and give you greater control over your variables.


6

With a blade grinder, yes. They already just chop the pieces smaller and smaller until you stop, anyway. With a burr grinder, it may be. But I make no promises that it won't clog the feeder. It's possible that the inflow may be greater than it can handle.


6

The main difference between the ceramic and plastic V60 is heat retention. The ceramic will retain heat and can be pre-warmed, creating a stable temperature. Depending on who you are this may not make a huge difference but I prefer the ceramic as I feel the plastic sucks some heat out of the water/coffee. The other reason I prefer ceramic is for cleaning ...


6

It would depend on a number or factors including temperature of the warmer and humidity in the room. However, personally, I can begin to taste a difference after as little as 45 minutes on the warmer. I tend to drink two cups of coffee pretty quickly to avoid this. Coffee is a product always best fresh, but how long before your palate can detect that it ...


6

Filter ground coffee stands for roasted, then cracked to smaller pieces to be brewed easily coffee beans. The question is, how small and consistent you should crack them to pieces. This is important as it affects the extraction of the coffee, so your cup. You should crack all the coffee beans at the same desired size for a good cup of coffee. Here's a ...


5

My suggestion would be that you stop using the machine and take a pour over cone or french press and your own grinder to work. The reality that I have found is that most people are willing to drink horrible coffee so long as it is free. And that given that choice, most people would rather drink free horrible coffee than good coffee they have to pay for. I ...


5

From this site: Start with a grind size around that of coarse sugar. (Think Sugar in the Raw.) How much: Most pourover drippers work best when they're between one half to two-thirds full of coffee grounds. Any less than that, and there won't be enough coffee to restrict the flow. Any more, and your dripper may overflow. You'll also want ...


5

Do you have maker with a removable filter basket? (Like the photo I attached below.) If so, then you might try what I've done: removing the basket placing the filter then running water through it The support of the basket protects against failures. And while you won't be able to rinse the reverse side easily, you will be able to get enough water into it to ...


5

I think you have already listed the "industry standard" that is the answer to your question. It is a good starting point for anyone and the amount can be adjusted by taste afterwards (more grounds for stronger coffee, less for weaker). The amount may vary with brewing method of course, since depending on the method, brew components (grounds, filter, other ...


5

I've tried it and liked it, but that's just because I like the taste of cinnamon in general. It doesn't enhance the taste of the coffee itself, per se, but adds its own additional flavor, which does tend to marry nicely with the coffee's. And yes, you can certainly put it in black. Actually, back in my drip coffee days, I'd sometimes put a couple sprinkles ...


5

Yes, it'll be fine. Drip brewing and pour-over coffee are essentially the same process: Pour hot water over ground coffee to extract flavor compounds, then let the infused hot water solution drip through a filter into a serving vessel. As far as the final product is concerned, it doesn't especially matter if this happens in a machine that dispenses the ...


4

I love good strong coffee. To lose flavor is a deal breaker. I tried the gold mesh filter and it is un-acceptable to me. I went back to paper. I was told that because of the screen mesh bottom the permanent filter (like the one I had) has, the hot water doesn't stay with the coffee long enough. It passes right through. Whereas the paper holds it longer, ...


4

Looks like a standard metal mesh reusable filter! The mesh is probably stainless steel, perhaps with a gold-tinted coating, sandwiched between a plastic frame. They're alternatives to paper filters for filter/drip coffee. I find the outcome to be a little gritty/grainy; more like French press than a regular paper filter. In general, if your filter is still ...


4

I highly recommend anyone looking at a pour over to take a look at the Clever Dripper. It's a pour over brewer with a plate at the bottom that restricts flow unless the unit is resting on a cup. You can use it as a regular pour over or you can use it off a cup to steep your coffee. It allows all the control of a press and the grounds free cup of a paper ...


4

I hope this isn't a trade secret or anything, but at Starbucks we recently got new measuring pitchers for pour-overs that have a long narrow snake-like spout. It allows you to more or less just pour straight down the center. The narrow "bore" so-to-speak gives a precisely controlled rate of pour. Confusingly, all the documentation still refers to a bloom. ...


4

If you think you can get some money but not a lot, I'd start by switching to whole-bean coffee and purchasing both a grinder and air-tight containers to store the coffee in. Even cheap coffee tastes much better when it's fresh and freshly ground. Buy a mid-range grinder and two airtight containers (one for whole beans, and one for grounds). At the start of ...


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