11

Let's take a look at what turns coffee grounds and water into coffee: It's an extraction process where aromatic compounds and oils and caffeine are extracted from the coffee bean into the water. It's a "standard chemical process", done in millions of kitchens and cafés all over the world. Basic chemistry will tell you that the temperature of the solvent ...


7

The drip-type coffee is available in many countries in Europe. A list of names: Filterkaffee in Germany / Austria / Switzerland filterkaffe in Denmark and Sweden filterkoffie in the Netherlands kawa filtrowana in Poland café filtre in France / Switzerland / Belgium café filtro in Spain caffè preperato con il filtro in Italy / Switzerland Can you see a ...


7

Cold brew, SUPER simple version. A.K.A. my college days version. One tbsp of any coffee per cup of water. Let it sit in the fridge for about 12 hrs. Pour and drink. In my college days I got a half gallon milk jug. Washed it out of course. Which is about 8 cups. I would put 8 tbsp of any coffee I could get my hands on and put it in the fridge over night. ...


6

Filter ground coffee stands for roasted, then cracked to smaller pieces to be brewed easily coffee beans. The question is, how small and consistent you should crack them to pieces. This is important as it affects the extraction of the coffee, so your cup. You should crack all the coffee beans at the same desired size for a good cup of coffee. Here's a ...


6

A "pour over coffee cone and paper filter" will make excellent coffee. You'll only need to get good ground coffee and hot water to enjoy coffee aroma and taste. Hope this is helpful


5

One of the reasons I like my French Press is because of the caffeine boost. One simple answer to your question is to add more coffee grounds. But aside from the type and amount of coffee used there are several things that will influence the caffeine level of your coffee. One of them is the size of the ground. You need a ground big enough that it is filtered ...


5

Three things contribute to a good cup of coffee. The coffee itself. The tools used to prepare the coffee. The skills of the person making the coffee. Unless you're talking about espresso or espresso based drinks (cappuccino) the skill involved is easily developed. Do you use a burr grinder or a blade to grind your coffee? Or do you use pre-ground coffee? ...


5

I think there could be a few extra factors, besides grind type effecting your final cup. Are you trying to match the taste you get from an auto drip brewer by making your coffee with a v-60? Brewing method will change the taste. It's good to see you are using a scale too. When I make coffee I like to follow this chart for ratio. I use 21 grams of coffee ...


5

Cleaning is a hassle, sure. But something else to consider is the recurring cost of the coffee itself. Where I live, a bag of coffee costs almost as much as a coffee maker. Cheap coffee makers can be found for as little as $10 - $20. Small French presses are around $20 to $30. According to wikipedia: A customary "cup" of coffee in the U.S. is usually ...


4

For a phin, most websites recommend using a grind that you would use for a standard drip machine or a grind that is slightly coarser. Because every phin is different, it is necessary to experiment with the grind and find the result that fits your tastes best. For someone who cannot drink strong coffee, it is best to err on the side of caution and make their ...


4

Ground coffee is just the roasted coffee beans ground up to a fine powder. In order to make the beverage coffee, you need to combine this with hot water to extract the flavour (there are many different ways to do this). Typically, there is a filter that makes sure that the water can pass through the ground coffee but none of the ground ends up in your drink. ...


4

Due to the fact that this is a lengthy question, I will try to be concise and to the point. In short, yes, all of these main types coffee makers use a different type or size of filter. Sometimes each type can use a different filter. I will provide a non-exhaustive list of filter types for these coffee makers which you have listed. Although the list in non-...


4

It's the same answer to the question, Why does hot water clean better? When water is hot, the molecules spread farther apart and move around faster. This allows the molecules to work its way in to dirty material and loosen it up. It speeds up the process of soluble matter in becoming solubilized. So does hot water clean better? Well it cleans faster, which ...


4

The photo you have posted is a standard moka pot (See Wikipedia entry here) by a well-known brand, actually the inventor of the moka pot. You should fill it up to the safety line. You should see it when you fill it. That line is generally curved inside. Filling it more than this line may cause high pressure due to evaporation of water and it may cause harm. ...


4

If you have access to an electric outlet, small coffee machines are cheap. If you have access to hot water or a way to create hot water (a gas burner in a communal kitchen, perhaps) there are tons of options; a few examples would be a French press, moka pot, a 'pour-over', and single-serve coffee bags (just like tea bags, only with coffee). If you have ...


4

Well, when there is no grinder, plunger, filter machine, or espresso machine, and even no cone filter papers, you still can make a great cup of coffee. I used to do this method when my coffee machine had been broken: Get any grounded coffee pour some hot water give it a good stir for one minute or so leave it to brew for a couple of minutes ...


4

Recommendation Since you want a bean-to-cup brew machine, you're limiting yourself quite a bit in terms of choice. That can be a good thing as it narrows down your options. When to bean-to-cup brew machines I'd recommend the Breville Grind Control™. It's not a commercial-size machine, but with only 6 people that would probably make it needlessly expensive....


3

It's the pre-infusion feature of your machine in conjunction with the grind you were using. From their site: Pre-Infusion: To extract the full flavor and aroma when you brew your espresso, the R58 has a dual pre-infusion system encompassing a working piston and static pre-infusion chamber. Most machines that have this feature understand that the pre-...


3

There may be some advice on this. My first will be to check the pressure as you can do this with your pretty machine. Please check if you are around 9 bars when pulling the shot. One reason of delay is, it takes a while for the water to wet the grounds. So, it is normal to wait for a few seconds to see the first drops. However; if it is more than a few ...


3

This question is actually answered on the website of the coffee producer. To summarize, the roasting process of coffee produces carbon dioxide inside the beans, which takes a while to find its way out. Sealing the coffee in tight containers would be problematic, as the carbon dioxide would stay in the beans in this way (making the coffee sour) or may let ...


3

I think I put a new gasket in the Vesuviana once, but I find it more of a pain to clean than I like. Still, gotta be pushing 50 years old, pretty reliable. Also a stovetop device, but purported espresso. Espresso snobs may say it's not real espresso. For cappuccino there are similar stovetop devices to make steam with.


3

Funnily enough, I often find espresso based coffees don't provide the same jolt in the morning, whereas coffee from a cafetiere does. However, keeping on topic, there is a lot of personal preference involved when it comes to coffee, and it could be that the taste isn't triggering that wake up moment for you. As @Ecnerwal mentioned, there are "standards" ...


3

Per that pinnacle of modern "research", caffeine is extracted early/easily, so long brew times are probably going to have minimal effect. I have actually been going through a French-press phase recently (starting with the drip coffee maker being unintentionally left to mold over a vacation, but I have not gone back to it even after cleaning it throughly.) I'...


3

You may stir(, preferably quite a lot). As discussed in this question stirring eases coffee extraction.


3

I'm going to isolate this response to only drip brewing machines since if we start talking about espresso, all my assumptions fly out the window. Really you pay for the following on a machine: Looks Water Temperature Control Proper design of brewing (water shower, pump rate, cone / basket design) Brand Older drip brewers lacked a few things. The brewing ...


3

Probably your grind, or your grounds to water ratio is off. I typically use around 8-9g grounds per 120g water. At this ratio, you should be getting very strong coffee from a pour over system, and in general it should not be sour. What you are describing sounds like under extraction. This could be caused by a number of things. I will focus on the pour ...


3

To add to @MindS1's answer, To help preventing your beans/grounds from going stale quickly, store them in the freezer in an airtight container. This mainly helps with preventing the oils from going rancid/off and helps prevent any unwanted flavours. This works better for beans as they will remain colder for longer and prevent the oils from turning and ...


3

Get a french press. they are inexpensive and make great coffee. You just need some boiling water.


3

For your situation, you can use the equipment that I travel with: an AeroPress coffee maker, a thermometer if you want to get the water temperature just right, a hand held burr grinder (here's a review of 7 products) -- or buy preground coffee. Assuming you have available: a microwave oven (or a stove or hot plate) to heat water.


2

I think the Gaggia Descaler would work fine in any espresso machine. Just use the same procedure and amount that worked for the Gaggia machine (or use the directions for The Oracle). I have never bothered to buy any commercial descaler, since they seem overpriced to me. I buy pure citric acid powder over the internet, and use that for both a Gaggia Classic ...


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