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18

There are several approaches that can aid in developing your palate. Cupping The preferred method of tasting coffee. This requires only a cupping bowl and spoon. Dose out coffee, pour in the hot water evenly, and at 4 minutes skim off the top to remove the crust while carefully not disturbing what has settled at the bottom. Wait about 12-14 minutes for the ...


9

To answer this shortly, no there is no coffee that has no bitterness. Bitterness in coffee is determined by different factors on which I will elaborate a bit now. First of all there are bitter substances naturally in coffee. The most obvious and widely known one would be caffein. However in truth only around 15% of the bitterness in coffee comes from ...


6

great question. There are a few factors that will give your coffee the flavor and such that you want. To fully answer your question, we also need to understand some of your preferences and the answer may change slightly depending on your those. One General question is when you say "bitterness", do you mean "acidity" of the bean, or potentially a taste ...


6

Irish Coffe is a very famous one. 1 cup freshly brewed hot coffee 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 jigger Irish whiskey (1 1/2 ounces or 3 tablespoons) Heavy cream, slightly whipped Read more at: Original Irish Coffee from Food Network.


5

The graph shown is a spider-web graph that is similar to a line graph but in a shape of a spider web. In this case, the scale (middle line, goes from bottom to top) shows the score each section can get. A blue line (or any color) is drawn according to the scale. A score closer to six will have its vertex nearer to the center of the web and a score nearer to ...


4

There's an interesting article from Whisky Advocate about aging of coffee and whiskey with some history and current offerings. Specifically, it talks about using a whiskey barrel, after the whiskey was removed, to age coffee (either green or already roasted). Also it discusses the outcome of the other way around: aging coffee in a barrel, then removing the ...


4

Look up Swedish Egg coffee! Egg coffee is DELICIOUS! The egg takes all of the bitterness away and you’re left with a smooth almost velvety texture. Hands down best coffe I’ve ever tasted but it is a bit time consuming and you will need a French press.


4

Apologies, this is not actually an answer to your question [it's too long for a comment] - but it may be more useful to you than the answer to your question: Crazy as this might sound given everything you've said, I would still suggest that the bitterness may be an integral part of what gives coffee the flavour that you enjoy smelling and having infused in ...


4

When reading about coffee roasting and searching around for espresso brewing, I have over the years learned that extracting coffee for too long will add bitterness to the coffee. My experience also tells me that the roast of the particular bean makes a big difference in the bitterness. Currently, I roast Costa Rica Tarazzu Cumbre halfway between the first ...


4

You can reduce the bitterness of coffee, but maybe not to a level that you'll like. (One friend said he couldn't stand bell peppers, explaining that if they tasted 10x as strong, I probably wouldn't like them, either. I've since asked people if there's a particular flavor they don't like, and heard a variety of surprising responses.) Judging by the coffee ...


4

Sure, Cafe Carajillo is a well-known recipe to consume whisky and coffee together. It is black coffee, some whisky and herbs mixed together. I'm sure professional bartenders probably know or invent more.


4

The best natural options for sweetening are, in my humble opinion, actual sugar or sugar syrups. Options include, in general order from less to more distinct taste... table sugar (sucrose), including common refined white sugar or less-refined options like evaporated cane juice or turbinado; honey; agave syrup; jaggery or similar minimally-refined sugar; ...


3

I would (with some bias) highly suggest reviewing all of the coffee you drink using Gastrograph Review for iOS or Android. This will help you directly address the problems you state in your question: It will help you better resolve specific flavors It will help you learn to differentiate specific regions and processing methods It will help you understand ...


3

I am afraid that for you, the answer may be “there isn’t”. From your latest comments you are a supertaster, who will always perceive bitterness a lot stronger than the average consumer who will appreciate some bitterness as part of the full package of flavors. Here are a lot of good approaches to reduce the bitterness, but none will remove it entirely, at ...


3

I have only read through some of the answers. I am no coffee expert. I too was searching for non-bitter coffee, which is what brought me to this page. I know exactly what you mean by non-bitter coffee. I was visiting Hawaii and tried the Hualalai Coffee. And it wasnt bitter! I bought some there and on the back they even state: "without the bitter aftertaste (...


3

Of course! The main variable here are the beans; the process is of less importance. The main source of bitterness generally arises from beans that have been over roasted and have most of the flavor cooked out of them, unfortunately this is the case for many beans in popular places such as Starbucks and Peet’s. One quick way to tell is if the beans seem ...


3

I too, seem to be perpetually searching for the perfect coffee. I am not looking for sweetness, but I want the least bitter-tasting coffee. I am not at all familiar with coffee terminology, but I think of a light tasting coffee, when I think of non bitter. I have yet to find a light tasting coffee that does not linger in mouth, I think I mean less ...


2

Sensory skills are one of the most important skills any barista and coffee lover could have. But, just like with any other skill, it takes time to develop. The first and easiest thing you can do is to drink as much coffee as you can and explore the vast world of flavor profiles and complexities of different coffees around the world have to offer. Maybe one ...


2

Maybe try a light or medium roast honey sun processed coffee with a cold brew or pourover. e.g: https://purecoffeeclub.com/honey-process-coffee/ BTW i am talking theory here. Some people have tastebuds which are extra sensitive to certain compounds and even minimal amount of that compound can taste overwhelming. https://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/...


2

I don't have a name for this recipe (because I borrowed it from a restaurant's seasonal menu years ago) but here's my personal favorite, best if you also love chocolate and have a sweet tooth. 1 jigger whiskey 1.5 jiggers creme de cacao 1 cup coffee top with whipped cream and a drizzle of caramel


1

Here is one Monkfruit! I find this sugar replacement to be very tasty without the negatives of stevia. It's expensive, but one of the best options if you are looking to be healthy. Lakanto Monkfruit Sweetener


1

Xylitol works really well as an alternative to sugar. I've made two coffee's, one with sugar and one with Xylitol, to taste test, and could only just tell the difference. No funny after tastes like many other alternative sweeteners.


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