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39

Yes, it's perfectly safe to drink and extremely delicious. In The Philippines, we often call this 'Kopi Alamid', and it truly is one of the rarest coffees on the planet. At around $20 per 75 grams (local price), it's also one of the world's most expensive coffees. The palm civet is a nocturnal cat (well, more like a ferret, but technically a cat) that eats ...


15

The Civet cat is out of the Java bag, and people around the world are bidding up the cost for this delicious coffee to $200-400/lb. and above. While I would like to convince you this coffee is dangerous and give you my address so you can send it to me for proper disposal, honesty compels me to point out the proper preparation makes it perfectly safe for ...


15

First I want to draw a comparison between how much caffeine is in a coffee bean versus a cup of coffee, a cup of tea, or a double espresso. In a standard cup of coffee, there is approximately 150 mg of caffeine. In a cup of black tea, steeped for 3 - 5 minutes there is approximately 50 mg of caffeine. In a double espresso there is approximately 60 - 90 mg ...


14

Although coffee generally becomes staler with time, heating coffee up in the microwave does not produce any harmful chemicals - as long as the container you are microwaving it in is microwave-safe. The microwaves emitted inside the microwave are a relatively safe form of radiation that cause the water molecules in the coffee to move faster, thus creating ...


14

It is a cultural issue, not a health one. Traditionally, rich, big coffee drinks like a cappuccino are drunk in the morning in Italy with breakfast whereas espresso is what is drunk in the afternoon. The reasoning for this is that you can take your time and savor a cappuccino in the morning because presumably you are not at work yet, but in the afternoon ...


11

Though caffeine's action as a diuretic is hotly debated, recently it seems the scientific consensus is that caffeine in normal doses is a weak diuretic in caffeine-naive individuals only (those without a tolerance), and only in doses exceeding 250-300 mg, or 2-3 cups of coffee. To go even further, A profound tolerance to the diuretic and other effects of ...


11

In short: there is no minimum recommended age for drinking coffee, but on the other hand it's not good idea to have kids drink coffee all day long. It is discussed in depth in the parenting site of Stack Exchange and the top answer thee states: The bottom line is that caffeine is generally safe, but it does have significant effects in children as well as ...


11

According to this review published in Psychopharmacology, it is very much not a myth. The caffeine-withdrawal syndrome has been well characterized and there is sufficient empirical evidence to warrant inclusion of caffeine withdrawal as a disorder in the DSM and revision of diagnostic criteria in the ICD. More explicitly (emphasis my own): Of 49 ...


10

Since decaf coffee isn't the same as caffeine-free coffee, the key point regarding addiction is the amount of daily servings of decaf coffee that deliver the 100 milligrams of caffeine needed to acquire some sort of dependence 1. The amount of such cups of decaf will vary according to the brand chosen. According to a study published in the Journal of ...


10

No. Coffee is often offered to people perhaps about to pass out so that they will stay awake long enough that they can be kicked out of an establishment. Alcohol causes dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and taxes the liver. To this extent standard medical treatment is fluid, electrolytes, and vitamins. Caffeine is never used in a medical setting to ...


10

Caffeine is only mildly addictive and only shows minor physical dependence. I does not threaten physical, social or economic health the way truly addictive dugs will. "Withdrawal" or skipping your morning cup might give you a mild headache. Here is a link to a brief description of caffeine addiction. http://www.m.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/caffeine-myths-and-...


9

Another take on addictiveness of coffee in addition to caffeine: there are several other psychoactive chemicals in coffee; some links/references are available from this page and this page. These chemicals include, for example, theanine, theobromine, and theophylline, in various amounts. I can't find good sources to say if (or the extent to which) these or ...


9

A hangover is the body reacting to being poisoned. Coffee, like any other liquid you might drink, will help with the dehydration. If your drunkenness has caused you to sleep in, and you normally drink coffee every morning, your headache may be worsened or partially caused by caffeine withdrawal, so a cup of coffee will improve that. And if you're feeling ...


8

Caffeinated beverages like coffee and soft drinks give short bursts of energy, but can actually cause fluid loss. Caffeine has been shown to temporarily raise blood pressure, and reduces blood flow to inactive limbs. Like many drugs, caffeine is chemically addictive and recent publication of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), ...


8

Coffee and in particular caffeine, has had a reputation of being bad for your health, possibly being associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and your heart health in general. Current consensus is that there may actually be some health benefits from drinking coffee, and those that drink moderate amount of coffee (3-5 cups) have lower risk with these ...


8

I kicked it by switching to caffeine pills so that I could carefully taper down. Before I started the process, though, I went to caffeineinformer to get a good estimate of my daily habit. I then used caffeine pills to replace the milligrams of caffeine I was having as coffee. From there, I began to cut the pills into quarters and slowly reduce my intake over ...


8

Coffee should be fine (unless you've heard otherwise from your dentist or other health care people of course!). There should be no additional concern about coffee, e.g., its acidity or temperature (other than normal caution). There are some foods to avoid, but I don't see coffee or anything similar on any list of foods to avoid; here's a few curated lists: ...


8

This question is probably best answered in two directions: If you feel the need to add sugar to your coffee, it may simply be that the coffee that you are drinking is not very good. Sugar makes a lot of things taste better in addition to the sweetness that it adds. There are many ways to improve the quality of your coffee, like buying better and fresher ...


8

Similar questions have been answered in Coffee SE several times. So please check these previous questions first. I'm enlisting the most related ones I can think of below: How many cups of coffee is it safe to consume per day? What are the side effects of drinking too much coffee? Can drinking coffee at least once a day increase anxiety? Coffee on daily ...


8

The beverage you make by diluting vending machine "espresso" with hot water is called "poor imitation of Americano". It is hard to say how much caffeine it contains because it's not clear what this particular vending machine is filled with. It would also be wrong to speculate on its health effects without this knowledge and without knowing whether in general ...


8

You may find similar discussion mostly on the health tag. The most relevant question was previously closed on Coffee SE site as it was opinion-based. What's the minimum recommended age for drinking a coffee? Let me add my opinion here: my 2.5 years old niece drinks regular (not decaf) Turkish coffee together with us during her daily routine. Caffeine's ...


7

Coffee beans contain a chemical called cafestol, which tends to increase blood cholesterol levels, especially LDL ("bad") cholesterol. Brewing with a paper filter seems to reduce the levels of these cholesterol-raising chemicals in brewed coffee by filtering out these chemicals (e.g., cafestol, kahweol). Levels of cafestol in coffee are higher in non-paper-...


7

What you experienced was a caffeine overdose, however mild, and that's something that you shouldn't really try home remedies to correct. Had you gone to the emergency room, you probably could have expected to been given a laxative, activated charcoal, and possibly I.V. fluids. I doubt that they would have pumped your stomach over a single cup, but they might ...


7

Different people react to chemicals and stimulants in slightly different manners. It's entirely possible that the raise in blood pressure caused by caffeine may be exaggerated in some individuals (especially those who are caffeine naive) and cause headaches. On the other hand, caffeine may reduce or prevent headaches in other individuals through several ...


7

I'm aware of one in vitro study (though there might be others) of that demonstrate that caffeine is effective at certain types of hair loss -- in a "test tube", anyway. That is, this study from 2007 (another link from publisher, a colloquial summary of the study) took biopsy samples of follicles from men with AGA ("male pattern baldness") and treated them ...


7

Generally, governments find it necessary to regulate addictive substances due to quality of life or health issues that stem from abuse/addiction. While I will neither support or attack this kind of reasoning, when you think about children born addicted to heroin or methamphetamine, the property crimes generally associated with addiction, and the additional ...


7

A recent study published in Letters in Applied Microbiology suggests that coffee can break down bacterial plaques that form on teeth. These studies were done in a lab on extracted teeth, using moderate amounts of coffee on lab-grown plaques formed by bacteria from saliva. Antibacterial effect of coffee: calcium concentration in a culture containing teeth/...


7

No. Not any substantial ones. There are several listed questions around the topic of eating coffee beans. Ingesting roasted coffee beans without grinding/brewing them in some manner is quite common. Many companies sell them specifically to be consumed this way. Probably the main associated health risk would be caffeine overdose. However, it's roughly ...


7

Let's look at this from the worst case: The LD50 for caffeine is around 150-200mg/kg body weight for a healthy adult or 10g1. The caffeine content of a "cup of coffee" (however you define it) varies with beans, roast and preparation method, but according to Wikipedia, (50-)75-100 cups of drip coffee get you in the lethal ballpark. (More caffeine math on ...


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