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Basics Decaffeination (decaf) is the removal of caffeine from coffee beans, cocoa, and other caffeine-containing materials. While soft drinks which do not use caffeine as an ingredient are sometimes described as "decaffeinated", they are better termed "uncaffeinated" because decaffeinated implies that there was caffeine present at one point in time. ...


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We have yet to invent a process that removes 100% of the caffeine. When drinking decaf, the important question to consider is how likely you are to feel the effects of the trace amounts of caffeine that are left. That brings us, as most things do, back to the beans. Arabica has (on average) only half of the caffeine that Robusta contains. Now let's say you ...


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Since decaf coffee isn't the same as caffeine-free coffee, the key point regarding addiction is the amount of daily servings of decaf coffee that deliver the 100 milligrams of caffeine needed to acquire some sort of dependence 1. The amount of such cups of decaf will vary according to the brand chosen. According to a study published in the Journal of ...


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Only "Brew a pot and see if it wakes you up in the morning, or not." I can't think of any other test that is practical at home. Other practical solutions - Mix them and have half-caf until you buy new coffee. Just buy new coffee, as if it was forgotten in the move. And perhaps mark the containers in some way. In the overall cost of moving, it's a small ...


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Another take on addictiveness of coffee in addition to caffeine: there are several other psychoactive chemicals in coffee; some links/references are available from this page and this page. These chemicals include, for example, theanine, theobromine, and theophylline, in various amounts. I can't find good sources to say if (or the extent to which) these or ...


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You may find similar discussion mostly on the health tag. The most relevant question was previously closed on Coffee SE site as it was opinion-based. What's the minimum recommended age for drinking a coffee? Let me add my opinion here: my 2.5 years old niece drinks regular (not decaf) Turkish coffee together with us during her daily routine. Caffeine's ...


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There's no strain of coffee bean that has no caffeine when it is grown, but you can find whole-bean, decaffeinated coffee. "Decaffeinated" coffee has been treated to have most of the caffeine removed. Decaffeination is done when the beans are still whole, so you can certainly find whole-bean, decaffeinated coffee (though I suppose decaffeination could also ...


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According to Wikipedia: Decaffeinated drinks contain typically 1–2% of the original caffeine content, and sometimes as much as 20% [Decaffeination] is repeated from 8 to 12 times until the caffeine content meets the required standard (97% of caffeine removed according to the international standard, or 99.9% caffeine-free by mass as per the EU standard)....


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In short: Very probably, you will lose the very best part of your coffee. Caffeine is highly soluble, yes. But, also the other lipids and aromatics, too. So, you cannot obtain the benefits of specialty coffee if you ruin that first brew. The main taste we gain from coffee grounds are received from the soluble aromatic oils in the coffee. You don't want to ...


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Swiss Water process is the best because it's the most natural and has the best percentage of decaffeination. However, none of the processes are dangerous, I repeat, none. Unless you consume the decaffeinating solvents somehow, that's a different case. -.- Sourced from my previous answer at How is decaffeinated coffee made?


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According this source, a study by Dionex, a part of Thermo Fisher Scientific, found that decaf coffee is less acidic than regular coffee. That being said, all coffee causes the stomach to produce acid and the scientific results of the effect of both types of coffee on this are inconclusive. Some studies have found that patients drinking decaf have less ...


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Based on the article here and some brief experience with roasting decaf myself, I'd agree that the methylene chloride method seems to produce more flavorful beans. That being said it's hard to make a direct comparison due to the difficulties in getting a single batch of beans and getting them processed for decaf at multiple facilities. I think your best ...


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You should be able to find the roasted barley itself in an international food store, often sold for steeping like tea (a tisane). It is often called mugicha (Japanese) or other names. When prepared for tea, it is sometimes sold blended with, e.g., green tea, so be sure to check the label. Alternatively, a home-brewing outlet will probably have roasted, ...


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Actually, this answer will eventually boil down to the forecasting of time dependent expected coffee consumption function of your guests. You may expect that, right after a meal or right after they are seated people tend to drink coffee all together at once. Therefore, it is better to keep most (all?) of the pots filled up when you encounter them at first. ...


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According to this empirical evidence, only two of the eight people can correctly identify the decaf. Not an academic study, but still shows that you cannot find it by flavor, in my opinion. Otherwise, you should prepare a cup and go for caffeine test stripes. Still, those stripes will probably cost more than a few jars of coffee.


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A similar question was asked on the cooking stack exchange quite a few years back. The answers and comments there mostly address your first and third points. It seems that there's consensus that bubble formation differs between instant and brewed. However, I assume from your comment that both your decaf and regular were instant. There may still be ...


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My experience, as someone who went from drinking 2-4 cups of normal coffee plus several black teas per day to drinking 1-2 cups of decaf (and no tea) is that it IS addictive. hoc_age's answer that there are psychoactive chemicals in coffee other than caffeine makes sense to me. The decaf I drink is the Swiss method of decaf which is supposed to remove more ...


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if you're keen to experiment i'd look at homebrew(beer) stores. i'd try chocolate/black or coffee/brown barley malt(both pure barley names refer to roast) i don't live in the US but you should be able to buy for around a couple of $/lb. you also try mixing with crystal rye, smoked malt, peatted malt or anything interesting you can find. i'd also ask them to ...


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One of my favorites is Mystic Monk Coffee. I personally order their regular caffeinated coffee, but I have tried their decaf and they are just as good. They also make some flavor coffee that is decaf as well as regular, and they release some seasonal flavors every 3 months. There is also a half-decaf they offer of their regular roast, which you might be ...


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I roast my own, but my green bean supplier also supplies decaffeinated unroasted beans. I always have a pound on hand, but have never had occasion to roast and use them.


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When we werekeeping our caffeine consumption low, we used to brew a 50:50 mix of normal and decaf. Both were at the good end of what the supermarket sells ground, and were a nominally similar roast. The overall efect was like slightly less good normal. You could probably progress to something like 25% normal in decaf, especially if the normal was a ...


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