14

So I did a bit of research, and found a number of regional claims to 'egg coffee', including Swedish, Norwegian, Vietnamese and the American Mid-West. Of course I also found an article on Putting Weird Things In Coffee, which should be taken with a pinch of salt1. There seem to be a variety of approaches, but they seem to fall into three main camps: Add ...


7

In a coffee shop (assuming both places like Starbucks or non-chain versions), flavour syrups are a staple. Some have their own range, others use generic manufacturer's that are also used in other cooking or bartending applications. I'd assume a dash or two of these are added to your coffee and voilá: Vanilla (hazelnut/caramel/...) coffee. Another option ...


7

While I never heard of rice as coffee-substitute, people have used roasted malted barley, spelt, chicory or dandelion roots or even acorns (and other foods) to make a dark, aromatic brew that was used either separately or mixed with coffee, especially in times of scant resources. I suppose the rice would not be burnt1 (because that would taste horrible), but ...


7

You are quite right - the flavouring does indeed change the shelf life in a certain way. It is necessary to look at this from two perspectives. Shelf Life by Safe Consumption: The flavouring compounds used to flavour coffees last longer without degrading. This means that they ARE NOT the limiting factor when it comes to the shelf life of a coffee. ...


6

This site seems to suggest that the best time is just after the beans are roasted and still warm and "open", which makes some sense. However, it does state that many flavorers cold flavor the beans and simply add more flavoring oils to make up for the reduced absorption. I can't think of anyone that would flavor the beans before roasting. Not only would ...


5

What you have to keep in mind is that what might taste awful to you doesn't necessarily taste bad to someone else. Some people (myself included) really enjoy the bitter tastes and nodes while others, (such as yourself) find the flavors overpowering. In all honesty, I think that the only real answer to your question is that people are different and like ...


5

I've tried it and liked it, but that's just because I like the taste of cinnamon in general. It doesn't enhance the taste of the coffee itself, per se, but adds its own additional flavor, which does tend to marry nicely with the coffee's. And yes, you can certainly put it in black. Actually, back in my drip coffee days, I'd sometimes put a couple sprinkles ...


5

I prefer my coffee flavored just with water. However, it is common for people to flavor their coffee with many other ingredients with respect to their personal preference. As personal preference is closely related to culture, yes, you may enlist some location-based flavoring ingredients for coffee. In Turkey, generally, coffee does not have any ingredients ...


5

For certain high-intensity flavours, often people use extracts (think stuff like "vanilla extract") or essential oils (i.e., oils that are the "essence" (or are infused with same) of a given plant or something). This allows you to use a very small amount of the flavouring substance in something like coffee or confectionery or so. However, certain extracts ...


4

I don't know any history behind the practice but I learned it myself during a rafting trip down the Grand Canyon back in the early '90's. The method was to put a couple of fistfuls of loose grounds in one of those giant porcelain coffee pots that look like they came out of a Zane Grey novel. Follow with two whole uncooked eggs and with a big metal spoon, ...


4

I am not a big lover of flavorings in coffee, but there's one spice that works very nice with turka called hawaij. It's a mixture of black pepper, cumin, cardamom and turmeric, commonly available in the Middle East.


4

Liqueur coffees are a whole category of coffees flavoured with alcohol. Irish coffee is probably the best known example. Wikipedia has a list of coffee drinks, but as you can see from other answers here (and indeed your own question) it's not complete. The cardamom-flavoured coffee I've had has been Saudi, and uses an unusually light roast, so the end ...


4

In Canada and probably America too, pumpkin spice lattes have taken off and some stores now sell pumpkin pie spice mix which is a great flavouring to plain coffee.


4

Peanut butter coffee Inspired by your question I did some experimentation. Peanut butter itself did not work well for me, I could not get it to mix well. I happened to have a powdered penut butter, this worked much better. I added it like it was powdered cream and sure enough it tasted like peanut butter coffee! The perfect ratio for me seemed to be 2 tbsp ...


4

i think it doesn't make coffee taste better. it's up to you, if you like coffee and like cinnamon - then go for it, why not? generally speaking, adding spices makes the coffee good for you. it is customary in eastern cultures to add cardamom to coffee and serve it on high political summits and stuff. cardamon coffee calms you down and gives you calm energy....


4

Heath benefits of adding butter in your coffee are: 1) Vitamin K is found in butter,which helps in blood clotting and keeping the bones strong into old age. 2) Contains Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which helps in weight loss.Not only burning belly fat,also protects against cancer and encourages muscle growth. 3) Adding butter in your coffee can provide ...


3

Since i was a child my mother always cooked roasted rice or we call that SARA SARA,I feel better everytime we drink it as replacement of coffee,but i suggest not to burn too much coz it taste bitter😋 As on our experienced i noticed there's no side effect,it's just my opinion😊 Just try it sometimes but don't take it everyday 👍


3

You'll probably be able to get away simply with ground cardamom/cardamon added to the grounds when you're "pre-infusing"/steeping the coffee grounds in the AeroPress. It's probably best to use very finely ground, freshly ground cardamom seeds. You may even wish to grind the cardamom seeds along with your coffee (i.e., in the grinder at the same time); you'll ...


3

Here comes an unintentionally snarky answer: Flavored coffee and high quality coffee are rarely synonymous. Since flavored coffee masks the organic and natural flavors of the coffee itself, it's rare that a quality bean is used in the first place. Imagine ordering a Glenlivet 18 with Pepsi. Ergo, I'd say that your brew temperature with a flavored coffee ...


3

I have just made one batch with Xylitol: Other websites also recommend Erythritol - which isn’t surprising, considering that both are sugar alcohols. (Note that both can have a laxative effect, individual tolerance varies.) Apparently the (non-)sugar granules aren’t even required, I have seen (albeit not tested myself) recipes that use liquid sweeteners, e....


2

Oh yeah! I used to get that stuff! Cameron's if I remember. I believe the flavor was a nice mix of caramel, whisky, butterscotch and vanilla. Maybe a little cinnamon too. I thought it was reminiscent of spiced rum... maybe a rum flavored extract could get you where you are going. I wouldn't be surprised if the name is just creative copy and there isn't any ...


2

I am familiar with the use of eggshell only. The reason is for the benefit of calcium carbonate as has been mentioned before. It takes the bitter edge off coffee brewed using methods which do not provide proper extraction i.e. poor quality drip machines. The lack of proper extraction can make the coffee bitter or sour tasting. The egg shell removes those ...


2

It's an old cowboy campfire recipe. The egg helps to absorb the grounds to keep them out of your cup, but it also helps to neutralize the acidity of the coffee. I can't tell you where it originated, but I know that's how my German grandmother used to make it. It does make the coffee a lot smoother.


2

Another approach, probably yielding a more subtle taste is roasting the green beans with the oils of the taste you're going for. I've once tried, with moderate success, to roast a small batch of butterscotch coffee, since I had the corresponding oil available. The success was moderate, partly because it was a pan roast, and I'm still new at this, however ...


2

i was diagnosed for an acid reflux and taking coffee is a No- no...then i took rice coffee/roasted rice as substitute and find it good! no caffeine and it makes me burp after a couple of minutes taking it..,it's called "tinutong" in bicol..'coz when i was a young:) my mom sometimes made it for me..then now i take it again...it's been 5 months now that i didn'...


2

Being ill or recovering from being ill can certainly change your sense of taste. Can you get somebody else to try the coffee you get that smell/taste from to see if they also do? At least you can eliminate you or the coffee. Taste Changes - Topic Overview


2

There are two ways that this is commonly achieved. Flavoring syrups. These are what you most commonly see at coffee shops. Mostly they are used in flavored lattes and mochas. Some local shops might make their own, but they are commonly purchased from a larger company. They also sweeten the coffee. Flavored beans. This is what you commonly see at gas ...


2

Coffee is sometimes said to be an acquired taste. I was introduced to it by adding cream and sugar and told to imagine eating a coffee-flavored candy. Another favorite is coffee-flavored ice cream. Over time, I gained an appreciation for getting the right balance of coffee/sugar/cream. Now I drink a dark-roasted fresh-grind coffee using a pour-over brewing ...


2

I don't think it necessarily brings out any flavors in the coffee, but I think it complements some of the notes in coffee. I've heard cinnamon described as "sweet" tasting so maybe that's why it was perceived as being better tasting? Making it is pretty simple, just put a few dashes in your grinds before brewing (I'd experiment with the amount to see what ...


2

The benefits of the unsalted butter in your coffee really depend on, like most things, the quality of the ingredients. You should always use grass-fed butter (butter made from cows milk that have been grass-fed their whole lives), and try to go for organic. Also, perhaps better than grass-fed butter would be grass-fed, organic ghee. Ghee is a "clarified" ...


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