27

Hand grinders will work without electricity. You can generally get a conical hand grinder cheaper than you can get an electric one. They also create less noise than a electric grinder. Hand grinders will generally produce less heat than an electric (may affect bean flavor). Many grinders are lighter and smaller than electric ones. They are portable ...


25

I have the same problem, and these things definitely reduce it: Grind more coarsely. Blade grinders are incapable of really doing this—they give you boulders and powder. But I've never been satisfied with the taste when I use coarse grounds— it's weak and lacks body. Make sure the screen fits well and no grounds are squirting along the sides Press gently, ...


17

Ground beans have a much larger surface area by weight than whole beans. When the surface of the bean is exposed to air chemical reactions take place. I doubt that these reactions have been completely characterized but at a minimum they include some loss of aromatic oils. In other words, the processes that lead to a judgment that coffee is "old" happen ...


16

In general, I argue that you shouldn't be able to re-use the grounds. That is, for any brewing session, your goal is to extract exactly what you want from the beans. If you do this optimally for your method and taste, there's nothing left in the beans that you want; re-extracting will give you a different result. The second brew might be drinkable and even ...


15

Coffee should never be stored in the fridge! In the same way that baking soda absorbs smells, coffee will absorb smells and flavors in your refrigerator. These compounds can be extracted when you brew your coffee and will contribute to undesired flavors. Proper storage of coffee is to put your beans into an airtight container, and store around 25C out of ...


14

They are very good as de-odourizers, we use them in the kitchen and sometimes in a small perforated plastic container in the footwell of the backseats in our car. The fragrant smell lasts a long time also surprisingly. Also it seems to be useful in fridges too. That link lists the following: Deodourize fridge As a scouring agent A cheap varnisher Dye for ...


13

Are you using a burr grinder or a blade grinder? Blade grinders physically cannot give a consistent grind; you'll always have some too-fine (and some too-coarse) bits of beans. If you're having the beans ground where you buy them, have them done as coarse as the grinder will go and see if that helps. You can also try replacing the screen in your press. (...


11

In general, it's best to not store ground coffee. If quality really matters, then the real answer is to back up. Try to grind only enough coffee for what you're using immediately to brew with. If you're buying preground coffee, then storage and optimal quality become somewhat trivial. Once the surface area of the coffee is increased (by grinding it), the ...


11

It boils down to taste - some people even chew whole beans. Safety-wise there are no concerns1 and the method you propose is not unheard of, it goes by the term "Cowboy coffee" and others. Some preparation methods even quickly boil the grounds and water (Turkish coffee), other sources warn against pouring boiling water over your grounds and suggest letting ...


11

I will not go into any political discussion, theory or similar, but I can give you a few historical facts. There have always been times in the last few centuries when coffee was a rare commodity. And it has always been expensive to some degree, making it "something for special occasions" in the poorer parts of European societies. People used and still use ...


11

Adding coffee grounds to a planting medium (e.g. soil) adds fatty acids, essential oils and nutrients that enrich soil which can help the growth of the plant and it may also affect the colour. One thing to be careful of is that some coffee grounds increase the acidity of the soil. However, I can't find anything indicating that it will affect the flavour of ...


11

Here's an opportunity to start refining your brewing process. Coffee brewers, including myself, tend to use weight as our measuring unit as opposed to volume since bean sizes vary significantly already without accounting for origin or roast level. All of these factors will change the real amount of coffee you believe you have once ground and also change the ...


10

When grinding coffee, the particle size of the resulting powder can be described with a bell curve, whose width (and thus, the powder consistency) varies on mostly the roast and the grinding method. A manual grinder with adjustable grinding size will produce a more consistence powder, whereas electric grinders (especially the cheaper household ones) will ...


10

The Short answer to this is no. You should not use a glass jar for storing coffee. Why? The base of the answer can be found here: When Does Coffee Go Off? Coffee goes stale relatively quickly, and the transfer to a glass jar will: Increase the coffee's interaction and exposure to oxygen Increase the coffee's exposure to light, which will cause ...


10

Yes. Coffee grounds are simply the ground up seeds found inside the berry of the coffea plant, so eat up! Even after the beans have been ground and extracted into your favorite coffee beverage, they still contain plenty of caffeine and are perfectly digestible. Before people learned to brew coffee, folks were eating the beans to get that coffee boost. ...


10

Is it possible that you read a few posts on the Internet the wrong way? The grounds will not disappear, if anything they will appear "more", volume-wise because they swell in the hot water. There are two points about "grounds on the bottom": In the bottom of your cup, indicating a too fine grind of the beans or a hole in the filter mesh. Some very fine "...


9

Your method most closely resembles Turkish Coffee, which is suggested to be served at hot, but not boiling temperatures. Since the exposure to the grounds is so direct, it's easy to burn the coffee at boiling temperatures. You want a full body, but not a burnt taste (yuck!) Turkish Coffee World recommends about 158 degrees Fahrenheit or 70 degrees Celsius.


8

As an avid composter I can say that I have always used lots of coffee grounds and my compost has always done well with it. There are a few reasons why it is beneficial: used grounds are fairly pH neutral. If your compost is too acidic they even help a little by absorbing extra acid. Unused grounds however would add to acidity. coffee grounds are considered "...


8

I am South Indian and this is a coffee producing region, but the typical local coffee in my home state is sold ground extremely fine and will pass through the metal mesh filter of a French press. Here is an "adjustment solution" that works very well for me when I try to brew finely ground coffee in a French press: after mixing the fine-grain coffee powder ...


8

Assuming that: you have found the best available beans in your market. which are then finely grounded and used instantly after the grounding (have in mind the finer the grounding the faster the coffee taste deteriorates as it both absorbs humidity and all smells from the environment with it and in the same time releases its aroma). You can look for: ...


8

Three quick and easy hacks you can do without throwing capitol at the issue: Shoot a dud pot first thing in the morning. By brewing a coffeeless pot and throwing away the water, you will empty the the Bunn's hot bladder. Think of it as a morning tinkle for the CWTF15-APS to git rid of the rank overnight water fouling your morning joe. Use an extra filter....


8

I value sealed over opaque. Go for the sealed glass. Opaque is not really the goal, but rather in the dark. Keeping the stuff in a dark location, even in a clear container, will be fine. As far as priorities for storage in general, according to the USA National Coffee Association (and others including Blue Bottle and a lengthy missive from The Atlantic), ...


8

Probably closest to an espresso is an AeroPress, which is similar to a French press, but uses manual pressure to extract more aromatic componds while being lower on bitter and sour notes than most other methods. And of course all the "hand filter" varieties of the drip-family can be an option, if it's simply coffee, not exactly espresso you are after. In ...


8

Seems like a bad way to start a day to me. This method will over brew the coffee and give it a gritty texture (especially at the bottom) but as the other poster have mentioned it really just boils down to taste. Experimentation is the only way to find out what you like. To what I think is the deeper point of the question. How can I drink coffee without time ...


8

How's the mastering coming? Thought I would weigh in to provide a little extra help. I'm a barista and head of customer education at Handground. We are working on a French Press brew guide right now but since it's not done, I'll share a quick tutorial. The goal with brewing coffee on any device is to maximize the extraction of good-tasting flavors and ...


7

In general consistency is more important than a specific setting. The key is that you can actually control both the size of the grind and actually achieve a homogenous grind allowing you to increase the consistency in the coffee when you brew it as you can assertively control the service area being exposed during the brewing process. Since you stated that ...


7

My experience is that some jar lids are almost impossible to make completely odorless, while the glass simply needs to be soaked in a mixture of baking soda and vinegar for a few hours. I have even read that leaving the jar in the sun for a few days works efficiently, but since we don't have that much sun in my part of the world i have never tried this ...


7

With a manual espresso machine, I have used the same grounds for two pulls. They are ok in a pinch if I want that volume but don't want to redo the grind, tamp etc. But honestly it is not as good as the first time through. The only thing I can suggest is that when I do them one after the other, it is ok. If I wait for the grounds to cool it is not really ...


7

The drip-type coffee is available in many countries in Europe. A list of names: Filterkaffee in Germany / Austria / Switzerland filterkaffe in Denmark and Sweden filterkoffie in the Netherlands kawa filtrowana in Poland café filtre in France / Switzerland / Belgium café filtro in Spain caffè preperato con il filtro in Italy / Switzerland Can you see a ...


7

An easy (but unscrupulous) way to lower the seller's cost of coffee is to add coffee that is cheaper, older, or unfit for consumption because spoiled or contaminated. The frequency and severity of this problem is almost impossible to quantify because the resale of such coffee is by definition illegal and, when discovered, probably not front-page news. ...


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