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One reason that the taste isn't as good for Robusta is that it has more caffeine compared to Arabica. Which may sound like a positive thing but caffeine carries a bitter taste which makes it an unpleasant drink. In fact the Robusta bean has 2.7% caffeine content, almost double the 1.5% of Arabica. Arabica contains almost 60% more lipids and almost twice the ...


20

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. I will use a lot of graphs, because a picture is worth a thousand words but a graph can communicate a concept, to dispel a lot of the myths about acidity in coffee....


14

Coffea Arabica and Coffea Canephora are the only two species of plants whose beans we use to make coffee - Arabica and Robusta respectively. However, you may have heard of other 'types' of coffee that might be confusing. For example Peaberry Coffee is not actually a separate bean type. 5-10% of harvested coffee berries contain only one bean (instead of two)...


13

Breakfast or morning blends are generally a lighter roast, but there is no industry standard for how light of a roast. As for differences between breakfast and morning blends, the key is in the word "blend". It is entirely up to the producer to blend different beans and different roasts and call it what they want. Edit: There are some differences in ...


13

Sumatran coffees (and others from the Asia/Pacific region, like Java and Arabia) are uniformly low-acid. As @Chris said, the processing methods and roast have a lot to do with it. Coffees that have been dry- (or "natural" processed) are lower in acids than washed-process coffees. Often, acidic coffee is described as being "bright" (e.g., Starbucks Colombia)....


13

There are several varieties of coffee that have all derived from the three species of Coffea genus of the Rubiaceae family: Coffee Arabica Coffee Canephora (Robusta) Coffee Liberica (Liberian) As you can see from this Counter Culture graph, each variety has a unique lineage, likely designed to grow well in a specific climate and geographical region while ...


12

Intended mostly as an adjunct to @fredley's answer, but content overflowed a comment, then I kinda went overboard. Though there are two (major) species of coffee (whose binomial names are indeed Coffea arabica and C. robusta with significant biological differences), there are a very large number of cultivars -- plants and seeds that are selected, or ...


9

To answer this shortly, no there is no coffee that has no bitterness. Bitterness in coffee is determined by different factors on which I will elaborate a bit now. First of all there are bitter substances naturally in coffee. The most obvious and widely known one would be caffein. However in truth only around 15% of the bitterness in coffee comes from ...


8

There's no strain of coffee bean that has no caffeine when it is grown, but you can find whole-bean, decaffeinated coffee. "Decaffeinated" coffee has been treated to have most of the caffeine removed. Decaffeination is done when the beans are still whole, so you can certainly find whole-bean, decaffeinated coffee (though I suppose decaffeination could also ...


8

Coffee enthusiasts & aficionados identify acidity as the dry, bright & sparkling sensation that sets a high-quality, high-grown coffee apart from a mundane, lower-grown coffee. Admittedly, this is the rather snooty way of looking at the issue, though it is true that many highly-prized coffees are grown at high elevation & are characterized by ...


8

I find that most of the Brazil dry processed coffee I get is very smooth or "low acid". However, in general coffees that are darker roasted will have less acid as the acids are destroyed in the roasting process. You may look at the description as well. Many of the fruit notes that some coffees advertise are coming from acid compounds that may overall ...


7

It sounds like you had coffee cherry tea, also called cascara, and regionally other names; in Yemen it seems to be called qishr according to Wikipedia. It's (to me) delicious, but rather different than roasted, brewed coffee beans. It has a lovely red hue, similar to rooibos but lighter. It's made by infusing the dried coffee cherries or just the husks (...


7

@To complement on the previous answers. About the Rubiaceae families that are used for producing a good cup of coffee. Besides the Arabica and Robusta families, you also have very good coffee coming from the Liberica family. I've tasted several Liberica varieties, they make a very unique cup. This variety is quite common in South East Asia where it was ...


6

The single biggest factor in the size of a coffee bean is the botanical variety of the plant. There is no amount of nutrition or growing conditions that can overcome the effect of genetics. In this picture from our garden at Coffea Diversa you can see two examples at the extreme. On one hand you have mokka, this variety has the smallest bean of all ...


6

Robusta and Arabica refer to different beans that are used for the coffee. In general it can be said, that Arabica beans contain less caffeine, and less acid than Robusta beans. The robusta plant has a greater crop yield than that of arabica, and contains more caffeine – 2.7% compared to arabica's 1.5% - Wikipedia This means Arabica beans usually give a ...


6

I can read Arabic and also I prepare Arabian coffee as you want, so here comes the recipe 1- you have to get a very fine ground, light roasted plain coffee 1 tps / 80 ml water 2- ground cardamom 1/8 tps 3- saffron 4- 1:2 cloves / 80 ml 5- rose water 1/2 tps / 80 ml A lot of Arabs drink it plain. Instead of sugar they eat dates along with it but you ...


6

In a coffee shop (assuming both places like Starbucks or non-chain versions), flavour syrups are a staple. Some have their own range, others use generic manufacturer's that are also used in other cooking or bartending applications. I'd assume a dash or two of these are added to your coffee and voilá: Vanilla (hazelnut/caramel/...) coffee. Another option ...


6

great question. There are a few factors that will give your coffee the flavor and such that you want. To fully answer your question, we also need to understand some of your preferences and the answer may change slightly depending on your those. One General question is when you say "bitterness", do you mean "acidity" of the bean, or potentially a taste ...


5

By now I have found out the method to prepare Khaleeji coffee as it is called. People drink it without milk or sugar. Ingredients: 3 cups water 3 tablespoons ground coffee from Emirates 1 tablespoon ground cardamon 5 to 6 cloves 1 finger tip saffron threads 1 teaspoon rosewater Method: Boil water in frying pan. Add coffee. Cover and boil for 10 ...


5

The graph shown is a spider-web graph that is similar to a line graph but in a shape of a spider web. In this case, the scale (middle line, goes from bottom to top) shows the score each section can get. A blue line (or any color) is drawn according to the scale. A score closer to six will have its vertex nearer to the center of the web and a score nearer to ...


5

Consumers (and marketers) are expanding their vocabulary for describing coffee. And at the same time coffee producers are improving and refining their methods. Both of these I think contribute to what you're seeing. The term "natural" process can be ambiguous. You might try to search on a more specific, technical term "Dry Process," usually a synonym for ...


5

There is a list in "The World Atlas of Coffee" by James Hoffmann: Sidama, Limu, Jima, Ghimbi/Lekempti, Harrar, Yirgacheffe. All have similar altitude (1400 - 2200 m range) and coffee varieties (heirloom). Also all regions are harvesting around October-February, except Ghimbi (February-April).


4

Sort of... These links, including the redesigned coffee lexicon might help answer your question http://worldcoffeeresearch.org/images/pdfs/WCR_Sensory_Lexicon_Edition_1_2016.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furan-2-ylmethanethiol EDIT: Additional information on the chemistry of coffee taste. This is produced by what we know as the Maillard Reaction - ...


4

Robusta is often used to "cut" blended coffee because it is most often cheaper to purchase than Arabica beans. Since it generally has a higher level of caffeine than Arabica, it may also be used to up the "kick" of blended coffee. Robusta is generally though to have an inferior flavor to Arabica, partially because the extra caffeine imparts some ...


4

Dry Process | This is the oldest method of modern processing. It requires very little equipment. It is basically a manual process of letting the coffee cherries raisin up, then peeling them. It is a labor intensive process. Dry processing tends to produce body heavy, smooth coffees with complex notes. Dry processing is used extensively in Brazil and ...


4

Geisha is so pricey because of a lot of marketing true. However it is extremely difficult to grow. On a farm is Costa Rica this past June the farmer was having a difficult time with his because the root system is not as robust as other Arabicas. Another reason for the price is that the yields per bush are lower. Here is a good article on it: Geisha Coffee ...


4

Today I had a coffee tasting of Liberica on various roast levels. I can say that Liberica is totally different from Arabica and Robusta. Arabica generally is bitter with a lack of after taste Robusta is generally strong with and lack of after taste Liberica is less bitter, but full of aftertaste (bitter, coco, sweet and a bit of berry taste) I would say ...


4

As the best of my knowledge, no. There is a bean variety named Jamaican Blue Mountain. Maybe its name could make people misunderstood... Nothing that is blue I've heard of. Other than that, not the regular coffee as we know it, but some of its variations may have different colors. Green coffee: This is the coffee brewed from the unroasted coffee beans. ...


4

You can reduce the bitterness of coffee, but maybe not to a level that you'll like. (One friend said he couldn't stand bell peppers, explaining that if they tasted 10x as strong, I probably wouldn't like them, either. I've since asked people if there's a particular flavor they don't like, and heard a variety of surprising responses.) Judging by the coffee ...


4

When reading about coffee roasting and searching around for espresso brewing, I have over the years learned that extracting coffee for too long will add bitterness to the coffee. My experience also tells me that the roast of the particular bean makes a big difference in the bitterness. Currently, I roast Costa Rica Tarazzu Cumbre halfway between the first ...


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