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Cold Brew Coffee - A Brief look at Flavor Profiles My company builds flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry, using machine learning, data science, and analytical chemistry - let's use some of our 20,000+ coffee reviews to answer this question with data. It has been claimed for some time that cold brew as a method of ...


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Yes. Coffee grounds are simply the ground up seeds found inside the berry of the coffea plant, so eat up! Even after the beans have been ground and extracted into your favorite coffee beverage, they still contain plenty of caffeine and are perfectly digestible. Before people learned to brew coffee, folks were eating the beans to get that coffee boost. ...


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Though I don't generally like to cite Wikipedia as my primary reference, it does in this case have a pretty good overview of terms related to coffee extraction, re-summarized here: Extraction: The amount of the original mass of the grounds that ends up in the brewed coffee. Though it certainly depends on the preparation method ("method of extraction", e.g., ...


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If you heat the water as per most brewing methods, it would no longer be carbonated/sparkling by the time you brewed with it. You would thus be confined to a cold-brew method, and if you wanted the water to remain carbonated you'd have to cold brew in a sealed container. That would be moderately inconvenient but should be possible. Or you could brew ...


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The main difference between the ceramic and plastic V60 is heat retention. The ceramic will retain heat and can be pre-warmed, creating a stable temperature. Depending on who you are this may not make a huge difference but I prefer the ceramic as I feel the plastic sucks some heat out of the water/coffee. The other reason I prefer ceramic is for cleaning ...


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There are a number of concrete factors that will impact the stimulation you get from a cup of coffee, but it probably boils down to the amount of caffeine (and any other stimulants) that are in your cup that get extracted from the beans. Here's a few factors that affect the caffeine content of coffee, with links to other related questions on this site: ...


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What I immediately notice is that you say the entire brew process takes only 5-10 seconds. Even for a 1-pot moka, this seems way too fast. Vary some other parameters: Start with cold water in the bottom chamber. While not the best way to brew with Moka in general, it might slow down the brewing process. You should want your moka brew to take closer to 30-...


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Stirring should be used if the grounds were not evenly dispersed in the beginning of the process for some reason (in immersion brewing methods). For instance, when I am using my pour over at work, if my initial pour leaves some dry spots floating on top. The Aeropress uses stirring prior to extraction presumably because the short time combined with the ...


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Yes, over- and underextracted are quite different from weak or strong coffee. The strength is determined by the amount of grounds, more grounds = stronger coffee. But that’s not what your recipe is talking about. Preparing coffee is a physical and chemical process (although some aficionados will claim that it’s an art) where soluble compounds (“flavors”) ...


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I, being a native Turkish and experienced Turkish coffee drinker for my life, quite conservative about this. There will be some major problems on producing the genuine Turkish-style with a syphon. The extraction process is made by heat, not by pressure in Turkish coffee. So, syphon is not what it is intended for. Two (or even three) times is quite correct ...


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Yes, because it allows more time for coffee to be extracted as it stored in a longer time for coffee to drip. However, other parameters also have effect regarding this issue (such as, type of bean, roasting profile, temperature, brewing method) But using double filter since it also filter the "flavor", making it stale (you may lose the pleasant acidic, ...


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You have everything right. If you want Extraction % you need to measure: Total dissolved solids: You will have to measure this using a refractometer. There are many out there, for commercial settings they start at around 300€. I have no experience with cheaper, "home use" refractometers but I'd assume they lack accuracy. Dry coffee mass (in g): You have to ...


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The best way to control of shot extraction without adding excessively complicated electronics (if by PID you mean proportional-integral-derivative controller) is: How fine is the bean grounding (the finer the grounding, the higher the density -> the slower the extraction). Applied pressure on the grounded beans in the machine group head (the higher the ...


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I believe the previous answers have it backwards. Plastic is less conductive and will retain more heat in the slurry. The simple way to test this is to touch the side of the V60 during a brew. The ceramic will feel much hotter because it's dissipating more heat. A pretty thorough experiment on this is documented here: https://www.reddit.com/r/Coffee/comments/...


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To add onto the previous answer, the main difference is indeed heat retention and cleaning. The ceramic will hold heat longer and is easier to clean. It is also more breakable. I recently wrote a blog post reviewing another Hario model, the Hario V60 Copper, and another thing to keep in mind is that the more expensive ceramic, glass or metal Hario models ...


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Folks - please be aware that there are at least two different thicknesses (not talking diameter) for Moka pots. I know that Bialetti makes gaskets in at least 2 different thicknesses. If your Moka pot design needs a thicker one and the replacement is the thinner one, the seal will never be what it needs to be and the flow of coffee will be affected. Hope ...


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Funny I should come across this topic tonight, as I'm reading a book right now about the science behind making coffee as a commodity, a beverage and an art form. One particular sentence from the book came to mind to help answer this question of your. It reads, "while acidity in many food items is often tied to sour flavors, acidity in coffee relates to the ...


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Note: I leave out a lot of the details of espresso shot extraction and just mention the major points of troubleshooting so don't flame me =p Acidity is always tricky when you talk coffee because there are differences between perceived acidity and actual acidity. Most coffees are slightly more acidic than milk, and they are in a very tight pH range. When ...


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The other issue you'll run into is that sparkling water is actually pretty acidic, and that's going to change the overall extraction process as well. If you want sparkling coffee, make cold brew and then put it in something like a Sodastream to force-carbonate it.


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I guess measure density just like you would in a college-lab? Just use a graduated cylinder. Extraction is mostly about how efficiently you can extract coffee solubles with an amount of liquid. Since refractometers are pricy, you can use a 0.1g scale and a graduated cylinder, to measure how heavy your shots are. The denser the better, however you also have ...


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Good coffee is extracted via highly measured methods, methods that attempt to always replicate uniform extraction. Blooming is a step taken in drip/pourover and sometimes full immersion methods to help coffee grounds degas before the proper extraction. This is because as gas leaves the coffee, it cannot simultaneously absorb water. Thus, using sparkling ...


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Refractometers are widely used to measure the opaqueness of the coffee during brewing to timely determine the extraction time. Spectrophotometers are used to measure color instead of opaqueness. They are mostly useful to determine the roast degree. So, why not? However, in my opinion, perfect is something defined by personal preference when considered ...


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The extraction percent of coffee could be calculated with a Petri dish, stove and a precision scale, if you don't have access to a refractometer. I assume, the original question here is: How does one calculate extraction percent? If this is the question, the answer is simply a refractometer as it directly reads the extraction percent. However, the main ...


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I'm sure there are instructions on maintenance and cleaning in the refractometers manual. However with distilled water and soft towels/tissues and/or Q-tips for the edges (be careful not to scratch the prism with the plastic handle) you can get rid of all the residue. Don't use alcohol or something like that. If the oils don't come off or if it's really ...


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The problem seems like either in the dosage or in the tamping force or in the grind size. First, I advise you to use freshly roasted beans. I don't know what is the pressure value at 12 o'clock position, but I assume it is correct. Now, let's check what could have been happened. Either you have less coffee grounds so the water travels a short distance in ...


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in the post roasting scenario here is a succinct article: https://theconversation.com/the-perfect-cup-of-coffee-boils-down-to-four-factors-30208 As your taste is unique experimentation will be required. I roast and brew ... it took me months to get to my formula. I will also mention the quality of water. I have settled on a balanced H20 'smart water'.


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I'm not sure if I have understood the question clearly. I will give it a try. For espresso making, the temperature is not directly controlled by the barista, but by the espresso machine. So, you should not worry about the temperature that much. In manual pour-overs or decoction-based brewing methods such as Turkish, temperature may be of interest. However,...


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Find some experiments (preparation in fridge, at room temperature and using the "hot bloom" method), including measurement of dissolved solids from the coffee grounds here.


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Okay, so what if I told you, that I sell a lot of cold brew at my shop, and have had success with 4-hour steeps. I've tried a bunch of stuff, and I've realized that since the temp is really low (mild to cold), it barely makes a difference in TASTE. The biggest factor is oversteeping (like, 48hours up brew), as it can make your cold brew sour. But as a rule ...


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You're on the right track with using a refractometer to measure coffee, but most people don't need a unit that expensive. There are more affordable refractometers if you don't need the VST CoffeeTools software. One example is the Atago PAL-1, which costs around $300. This is a digital refractometer. If you want something more affordable, you can get a ...


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