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15

You should not tamp the coffee in a Moka. These pots don't like excessive pressure, which tamping would produce due to increased density. This is also why the water should not cover the steam valve. In the worst case they can literally explode!


13

A moka pot is what some call a stovetop espresso maker; I find this to be a bit of a misnomer, because the result is rather different than proper espresso. Water is put into a bottom vessel; coffee grounds are placed on a perforated platform with attached cone, which is placed on/in the water vessel; a top holding tank with rubber gasket is screwed on top of ...


12

If you stop washing your mocha pot completely, you'll see a bit of a residue buildup on the inside of the pot from many past cuppas imparting their special oils to surface. This "seasoning" is said to protect the brew from any off flavors that might be imparted by the bare metal of the pot. Whether this effect can be quantified by a perceptible difference ...


11

Short story: They are probably aluminum oxide, but almost certainly some kind of metal oxide. You don't need to take any action unless they're affecting the taste of your coffee, and it shouldn't be. You probably can't (or shouldn't) really permanently remove them even if you wanted to. Longer story... This is a classic Bialetti model, and a classic ...


10

Yes, you just need to get a pot that's made of the right stuff. Induction hobs only work with magnetic metals. If you can stick a magnet to your coffee pot, it will work. Traditional moka pots are made of aluminium, which is why they don't. I have one that looks like this: A quick search on Amazon should find you what you want, or enquire at your nearest ...


9

Moka pots (or stove top percolators) usually produce a pressure of around 1.5 bar, while most coffees require a pressure of at least around 6 bar for a crema to appear. However, there are some Moka pots with a special valve (called Cremator) which helps creating more pressures and thus produce a crema. By the way, a real Espresso has to be brewed with a ...


9

While the grind could have been too fine, I suspect what happened is you overfilled the bottom chamber, and the water level was covering the safety valve. You really don't want the water level to go higher than the red line in the image below.


8

This is deliberate. In a moka pot, the downward spout of the funnel does not reach all the way to the bottom of the pot. Brewing will stop once the level of water in the pot falls below the bottom of the funnel (if you carry on brewing after this point, you'll be making coffee with the superheated steam, which will be burnt and bitter). I'm not sure why ...


8

Here's what I do: Boil a kettle with as much water as you're going to need for everyone Fill the sink with cold water Make your pot of coffee as normal: using boiling water After you've made the coffee and poured it out, dunk the pot in the sink of cold water It should cool down within a few seconds, allowing you to unscrew it, clean it out, and reset (it ...


8

Nice question. A similar myth has been arisen for Turkish coffee pot; such as it should be cleaned only with water to keep the greasy surface made with coffee oil. Partly correct, partly not. According to my "Barista's manual" from Lavazza, this sedimented oil may acetify. Thus, end up bad flavor. Again, (I cannot remember the source) as of my knowledge, ...


8

The amount of oil in your coffee correlates to what is called the "body"? This is the "fullness" that you feel of the coffee in your mouth. Like the difference between a light cake and fudgey brownie. More oil means more body. You get more body from brewing methods which, like you said, do not use a filter. This includes things like french press. The amount ...


7

It is true. Preboiling the water will make the coffee tastes a lot better. It will reduce the bitterness and give space for a lot of other notes. Heating up the Mokka too much releases also metallic taste from the machine itself and you boil the coffee.


7

OK, I've worked this one out. This little thing is called a reducer. What you can do is put the reducer into the funnel. It should sit on the indentation half way down. You then put coffee on top of it. This allows you to make less coffee with a larger pot. However, although I haven't tried it yet, it seems that most people complain that the quality of the ...


7

So what I've been taught is that you should keep the lid open while brewing. This is so you can watch the progress of the extraction, and cut the heat at the appropriate time. It gives you much more control over your brew this way - for example, I cut the heat (and run the base under the cold tap for larger pots) as soon as I see the coffee running from the ...


6

Due to the fact that the spots are picking up the colour of the coffee, it sounds to me like they may be scales from minerals in the water being used. This is normal occurrence for almost every type of coffee maker. When NOT to clean your Moka pot In daily use, do not use soap and water to clean the pot. This is because oils from the coffee will build up ...


6

The crimp is there to support the reducer! The reducer slots into the funnel, and sits on the ridge. You then put coffee on top of it, allowing you to use less coffee in larger pots.


5

As Robert explained the residue that is accumulated by not cleaning to rigorously is generally considered to add to the flavour. However, this remains a personal choice as always. I personally always rinse the pot with hot water straight after I pour out the coffee. This gets rid of the 'worst' of the residue without preventing the oils to build up over time....


5

In this case, my usual pre-coffee tiredness solved the problem: I had planned to mix the espresso grind with my usual grind to minimize the total amount of grounds in the cup. The idea was 1/2 too-fine grounds -> 1/2 the amount of dregs in the coffee. Being tired, I only remembered this when I had already filled the moka more than half-way with the ...


5

Actually, this question is self explanatory. I assume you only need some guidance and confirmation for what's going wrong. A better known fact is: if your coffee is underextracted, it tastes sour. if your coffee is overextracted, it tastes bitter. Now, let's tie up this to grind size: if your grounds are finer, your coffee overextracts if other ...


4

I'm going to start by answering your last question first just for fun. In this site, it says that: Place the pot over a low flame. A low flame increases the brew time, which enhances the flavor. At a later step, you’ll want a slow trickle of espresso instead of a full-force fountain. You would want a nice, long brew time. The flavor will be enhanced ...


4

The general idea is that tamping with moka pots is unnecessary/harmful/dangerous because of the excessive pressure this will cause (see Ivan's answer: https://coffee.stackexchange.com/a/489). However, we usually compact the ground coffee a bit with a spoon by slightly tapping on the grounds while making sure that there is a flat surface. This tends to give ...


4

If you just keep the fire at low levels, and the lid open, you won't spill coffee all around. That's what I do :) I also noticed a difference in the layer of creme on top of the coffee, with the lid open, for some reason, it produces more creme. Which doesn't make much sense as it reduces the atmospheric pressure.


4

Shop for stainless pots with a magnet! If it sticks, they will work provided the base is big enough. I found a larger unbranded one (at Goodwill!) with a flared base that works perfectly with my portable induction cook plate. Start at 1500 watts and drop down to 300 as soon as the liquid begins to show up in the upper container, the drop even lower and ...


4

You can buy an induction adapter. A quick search easily shows a few models. Disclaimer: I have never tried one yet. Legacy gas around here.


4

Just guessing here, but the hole could keep the water from going up until it reaches a certain temperature. The amount of pressure from the steam varies on the temperature of the water, and if there weren't enough pressure, the water would recycle. However, if the pressure were greater, the velocity of the water would prevent it from dripping out of the hole....


4

I think you gave a good overview of everything. Here's a few comments on your list that I find is most important from my own personal experience, and from this Bialetti guide. "Moka" grind is imperative. Most guidelines that I have seen recommend somewhere coarser than espresso and finer than drip (e.g., illy, Blue Bottle, and a bunch of blogs when ...


4

I understand that the crema created by the Brikka is an approximated crema using the gasket's small opening. Sure, purists may not consider this tan, smooth film of microbubbles as authentic crema (akin to espresso makers), but it does do a good job creating it for a close mouthfeel. I use my Brikka every day, and it creates the "Brikkrema" (as I'd like to ...


4

What I immediately notice is that you say the entire brew process takes only 5-10 seconds. Even for a 1-pot moka, this seems way too fast. Vary some other parameters: Start with cold water in the bottom chamber. While not the best way to brew with Moka in general, it might slow down the brewing process. You should want your moka brew to take closer to 30-...


4

The photo you have posted is a standard moka pot (See Wikipedia entry here) by a well-known brand, actually the inventor of the moka pot. You should fill it up to the safety line. You should see it when you fill it. That line is generally curved inside. Filling it more than this line may cause high pressure due to evaporation of water and it may cause harm. ...


4

The Bialetti two Cup stove top produces 100ml of coffee. That is in fact much more than two average espressos. A double shot pulled from an espresso machine would have between 40ml and 60ml. Your Brikka should thus produce roughly two double shots of espresso. Well it is not actually espresso, but that's a whole different topic. As far as I know there is ...


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