17

In fact, it seems that people would drink both from the cup and from the saucer: After being served a hot beverage (e.g., coffee or tea) in a cup on top of a saucer, some would pour a small amount of the beverage onto the saucer, and then drink from the saucer. There's evidence that this was reasonably common into the 20th century, and evidence that some ...


15

tl;dr: Permanent filters win on cost over time. Paper filters win on performance, clean-up, and health. Flavour is personal preference. Composting paper filters and spent grounds alleviates most of the environmental benefit of permanent filter. My conclusion: paper filters, discarded into a compost pile, win hands down. Use of permanent versus one-time-use ...


13

A moka pot is what some call a stovetop espresso maker; I find this to be a bit of a misnomer, because the result is rather different than proper espresso. Water is put into a bottom vessel; coffee grounds are placed on a perforated platform with attached cone, which is placed on/in the water vessel; a top holding tank with rubber gasket is screwed on top of ...


11

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. Lets use some of our 9,000+ full sensory reviews to examine the difference between Paper Filter Pour-over coffees and the Nel. TL;DR: Nel takes a ton of work to ...


10

This answer addresses a "standard" semi-automatic espresso machine with a separate grinder. Specifically the LaMarzocco and Astoria grinder, but the ideas should generalize to other machines of the same class. Cleaning Of course, wipe down everything and get all pitchers and spoons clean. Blast out all the milk and "wetness" from the steam wands. Inspect ...


8

I tried making cold brew for the first time recently and I just poured the whole mess through the reusable metal screen filter that came with my cheap drip coffee machine. My drip machine is the style where the top opens to add both coffee and water sort of like this: So I just put the metal filter in and poured the cold brew straight into the filter ...


8

Use a tea infuser! I got a tea infuser with a very fine mesh and put my grounds in that. It holds fewer grounds than I used with the "raw" plunge, but it's much more pleasant to use: I just pluck the floating infuser out of the pitcher and empty the grounds from it. I may get a second filter, or a larger one, but for now I'm content making coffee more often ...


7

This oddity of yours isn't really an oddity. The drinking from the saucer is actually a Swedish tradition. According to this site, it says that: Certainly it's an old tradition in Sweden. You pour the coffee from your cup into the saucer and sip it - usually quite noisily - after blowing a little on it (to cool it). Dricka på fat (drink from a plate, i.e. ...


7

They aren't just frothing the milk, they're also stretching the milk. Stretching it is what gives a latte its unique texture (though the micro bubbles add to that). If you want a good latte, focus first on stretching it - you can use a small whisk to get air into the milk if need be. You want a small stainless steel pitcher, most look like this: Put 2/3 of ...


7

Your problem depends more on the shape of the data than the raw quantities. 900 cups in 24 hours is one cup every 40 seconds or so, which isn't so bad, however I doubt that's the distribution of actual orders! I'm going to assume all of your 300 guests want to have a cup of coffee during a one-hour period. This works out as 5 coffees a minute, or one every ...


7

It's a French press. Put ground coffee inside it, pour hot water, stir a little bit, and then wait for 2 to 4 minutes (or longer if you want a strong and bitter coffee). After waiting, use the pump to filter the ground from the coffee and pour the coffee into your mug. I recommend using coarse or medium ground coffee, otherwise, the coffee will go through ...


7

Off the top of my head (by no means exhaustive): A two-group double boiler espresso machine You want two groups in case something goes wrong with one of them, you're not out of business. You also want to be able to use the steam wands while extracting, so the need for each group to have a double boiler is pretty big. Instead of one machine that costs a ...


6

Disclaimer: I have no coffee maker designing or manufacturing experience. This answer is based on internet research and professional experience. This answer addresses some of the product design challenges and less of the real engineering challenges, but a lead into the engineering challenges. Based on the question and comment I believe OP is interested in ...


6

I see only one possibility to make your turkish brew stronger and that is using more coffee beans per serving. You are using boiling water and long extraction time so almost everything from the coffee gets extracted leaving you this only option to make it stronger.


6

There are many things to consider. It is not really important whether it is copper or not. (Copper is for tourists in Turkey and generally of bad quality.) I advise you to choose a stainless steel one. If you choose copper, find a real thick copper one. Here, you can see a very good, thick copper cezve that I encountered. However, this is quite expensive (...


6

(Note: With a general perspective, you may classify coffee as a spice.) I imagine you mention the hand grinders. In that case, the main difference is the size of the canals of the grinders. E.g. in a black pepper grinder, the average diameter of the canals are a bit wider than the average diameter of black peppers. However, this diameter is far narrower ...


5

Easiest thing is a bean to cup machine like any of these, these will grind a pre-measured amount of beans, heat water and pump through into your cup and dispense the used grounds into a grounds bin internally. Going the other way you need a minimum of some form of grinder (preferably burr type) which can be manual or electric. A 'normal' espresso machine ...


5

The roasting chamber of your Gene Cafe is made of Pyrex (heat-resistant tempered glass), and leaving the old oils to accumulate and burn will cause the the inside of the drum to turn black. The darker material will likely change your roasting time, and the fouled glass will not allow you to monitor your roasts. Glass does not need "seasoning", so it should ...


5

Do you have maker with a removable filter basket? (Like the photo I attached below.) If so, then you might try what I've done: removing the basket placing the filter then running water through it The support of the basket protects against failures. And while you won't be able to rinse the reverse side easily, you will be able to get enough water into it to ...


5

I think you have already listed the "industry standard" that is the answer to your question. It is a good starting point for anyone and the amount can be adjusted by taste afterwards (more grounds for stronger coffee, less for weaker). The amount may vary with brewing method of course, since depending on the method, brew components (grounds, filter, other ...


5

The crimp is there to support the reducer! The reducer slots into the funnel, and sits on the ridge. You then put coffee on top of it, allowing you to use less coffee in larger pots.


5

Great find! How fun. You do indeed have a vacuum coffee maker -- a.k.a. vac-pot, syphon, or siphon. This style of vac-pot is intended to be used on a stove-top (specifically: having a flat bottom, and with a handle on the neck of the bottom part -- the "bulb") -- looks a lot like this current model from Bodum - c/o Amazon. There's a good primer on the ...


5

Actually the most common and widely used basket/tamper size is the 58mm. It also seemed, from a quick Google, that the Gaggia Classic does indeed use a 58mm portafilter basket so you'll want to find a 58mm tamper for it.


4

In short: Using a cezve of the correct size works better. The situation is similar to using appropriate equipment size in other coffee preparation methods (other examples at the bottom). That said, you can probably brew a passable cup of Turkish (or other names) coffee when your cezve isn't full to the neck (or, using a cezve that's "too large"). However, ...


4

I love good strong coffee. To lose flavor is a deal breaker. I tried the gold mesh filter and it is un-acceptable to me. I went back to paper. I was told that because of the screen mesh bottom the permanent filter (like the one I had) has, the hot water doesn't stay with the coffee long enough. It passes right through. Whereas the paper holds it longer, ...


4

Normally in a drip coffee machine the 'brew' mode is where the water in the reservoir is boiled/heated and dripped over the ground coffee, before passing through the filter and into the jug. The 'keep warm' part is usually a hot plate under the jug which heats the jug from below, keeping the coffee warm. My drip coffee machine doesn't allow you to switch it ...


4

Tannin is a chemical contained in coffee and this is what normally stains your coffee making / drinking equipment. When using an espresso machine it is advised to 'backflush' your machine with cleaning powder which cleans away a build up of 'tannin' from inside the machine. I expect a similar thing has happened to your carafe. With an espresso machine you'...


4

They sell tiny triple-A battery frothers on Amazon for under ten dollars. You can also find them at a kitchen supply store. They look like a wire with loops on the end that spin when you flip the switch/press the button. Put it in your hot milk, and froth it as much as you like. As for what cafe's use, their espresso machines will have a module that does it ...


4

I use this heat diffuser: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Truka-Large-Stovetop-Double-Diffuser/dp/B000LCNLJY/ to heat my flat-bottomed glass Cona vac pot, on a halogen heat glass hob, which I think is similar enough to a ceramic hob to be relevant. The diffuser also works to retain the heat, which helps with the process: Turn on heating element to mid-heat (I ...


4

It's important to note that you should be thinking of your entire espresso budget (i.e. Machine, Grinder, and Accessories) when trying to find the "right" price. If you were to buy a $1000 machine, you'd want to spend minimally $300 on an espresso grinder. If you're looking at spending a $1000 total and go with something that requires a little more technique,...


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