46

It took me an embarrassingly long time to realize the purpose of this hexagon shaped funnel, so I am sharing this via a self posted answer. The hexagon funnel has three purposes: It is a funnel to make it easier to pour your ground coffee into the aeropress opening. It is a funnel for cups with a small opening at the top. The image shows a shot-glass as ...


20

Here's a quick rundown of the Aeropress method I use every morning. I end up with a relatively crema-y shot. You'd never mistake it for one from an espresso machine, but there's a good layer all across the top. This is completely unscientific and I can't identify which steps here are the relevant ones for the good results, but maybe if you experiment with ...


17

According to the Aeropress manual: Remove the cap and set it aside. Push the plunger to eject the "puck" of spent grounds into the trash. Rinse and/or brush away any grounds left on the rubber seal. The seal has already wiped your chamber clean, so no further cleanup is needed. Always eject the puck right after brewing, and store your ...


16

In general, I argue that you shouldn't be able to re-use the grounds. That is, for any brewing session, your goal is to extract exactly what you want from the beans. If you do this optimally for your method and taste, there's nothing left in the beans that you want; re-extracting will give you a different result. The second brew might be drinkable and even ...


15

Aeropress coffee (hearby called Aerpresso in this post) is more concentrated than regular drip coffee. However, if you are using similar amounts of grounds as you would in a drip machine, you shouldn't notice any difference. Caffeine is highly soluble in hot water and most any extraction method utilizing hot water will result in nearly full extraction of ...


9

A few other factors to consider: Freshly ground beans. How you store your coffee beans. You basically want to keep them reasonably cool and away from oxygen, sunlight, moisture and variations in temperature (which is why you don't keep them in the freezer except for long term storage). Generally in the pantry in an opaque, air-tight container. I one-way ...


8

I typically aim to finish plunging at 2:30, using a fine grind and 200F water. But I'm always experimenting when it comes to the Aeropress, and would probably have a different answer in a month. I found it helpful when I first started with the Aeropress to try out some of the recipes from the World Aeropress Championships.


8

That sounds like the generalization that drip or pour over brewing is better for light roasts and stronger brewing methods are better for darker roasts. I'll counter that by saying that I often use my Aeropress for lighter roasts and my Clever Dripper for dark roasts and those cups come out just fine. The Aeropress makes a sort of quasi-espresso cup ...


7

With a manual espresso machine, I have used the same grounds for two pulls. They are ok in a pinch if I want that volume but don't want to redo the grind, tamp etc. But honestly it is not as good as the first time through. The only thing I can suggest is that when I do them one after the other, it is ok. If I wait for the grounds to cool it is not really ...


7

Ok, I'm mega late to the party but sharing's caring so here goes. We've all seen that aeropress sometimes produces a foamy, oily, tasty product on top of its shot and sometimes not. Without entering a geek war of whether this is or isn't traditional crema, let's just assume that this is what the OP wants when talking about crema so we can all be on the same ...


7

The aeropress does not produce crema. There is no where near enough pressure using the aeropress to produce crema. Crema doesn't make coffee better, its typically a sign of good espresso, but isn't found in any other form of brewing nor is it what make the coffee actually taste better. French presses don't create crema either, and its a misleading yet common ...


7

I have used both the paper filters and the "Able" brand metal AeroPress disk that you linked. They are a bit different, and I use both the metal disk and paper filter based on my mood. To my taste, the metal disk does produce a "fuller" bodied cup (because more "stuff" comes through the filter -- oils and macro-particles or whatever). I believe that "an ...


6

You really shouldn't expect to get good crema from the Aeropress. To get a good crema, you need pressure, far more pressure than you are able to generate by hand. I roast my own coffee, so I can brew it within days of roasting. I get a nice foam during the process, but this is different than crema.


6

My personal preference is to just add a bit of water to top my cup off. I do not use the inverted method, and by adding additional water during the brewing (since I tend to get just a bit of drippage during brewing) I tend to end up with pretty close to a full cup. However, if you are looking for a much stronger (pseudo espresso) cup, the second method ...


6

The answer is quite simply: It's up to your personal preference. Lots of things make a good cup of espresso; some people like (or think they like) single origin expensive marketing-buzzword-infused coffees, and others have found other roasts / blends that work just as well for them. You can use whatever you want in your aeropress to make a cup of joe that ...


6

Yes. Totally worth it. I just didn't enjoy the taste of the coffee pressed through those paper filters, and even if it could be improved somewhat by letting the coffee sit in the Aeropress for 40-60 seconds before pressing it out, I still couldn't see myself continuing to use it if that was all it was going to give me in terms of taste. Then I bought the "...


6

All coffee changes taste over time - it is full of relatively fragile organic compounds that will change over time. Even in a vacuum flask (without exposure to light), the coffee will keep chemically reacting with itself. There is also oxygen in the bottle which will aid the breakdown of various of the compounds. There really is no way to perfectly ...


5

99% of the coffee I drink is single origin since I roast my own and don't buy blends. That being said I also have an Aeropress I use 2 or 3 times a week to make coffee (I use a drip machine or clever dripper the rest of the time). What I have found is that any coffee I buy/roast that ISN'T recommended as a SO espresso tastes poor to me when brewed with my ...


5

In addition to abby's answer. The freshness of the coffee beans can have a large effect on the amount of crema produced. I've found that beans that are more than 3-4 weeks from the roasting date start to produce less and less crema. As coffee beans age, the oil starts to migrate to the surface of the bean and begins to oxidize (and its the oil in coffee ...


5

Crema is a foam of coffee oils, carbon dioxide- and air bubbles entangled in coffee grounds. (There is an exhaustive Coffeegeek article on the subject.) When extracting coffee using Aeropress, the foam floats up, gets filtered last, and gets trapped in the grounds and paper filter. Use inverted aeropress with something to catch the crema and a stainless ...


5

TL/DR: That's the one: How to Make REAL Espresso With a $20 Aeropress! - Tutorial (YouTube). I have had the aeropress for a couple of years, but only recently I started trying different methods of making coffee. I have run several experiments (I didn't document them. hat's off to andy!), and I have read a lot about what really IS an espresso, and how it's ...


5

The winner of the 2014 World Aeropress Championship - Shuichi Sasaki - used the following recipe: 16.5g coffee, 78℃, 250cc soft mineral water, EK43 grind at 9.5 Rinse normal paper filter, in standard position. 40g of blooming water for 25 seconds, stir 5 times. Add 210g of water, stir once. Press very slowly for 75 seconds. Leave 45g. Of ...


5

Yes, of course! As "fancy" coffee company Counter Culture says: Any Coffee, Any Brew. In fact, even things that aren't actually coffee (barley, tea, herbs, etc.) could be brewed like coffee in an AeroPress or other coffee-brewing equipment. But if fancy coffee is not your preference (or not practical, or not available, or whatever), try something different. ...


5

Don't brew in the Aeropress itself. Brew in a jar like in classic methods and use the Aeropress only for fast and easy straining, taking care not to stir up the grounds from the bottom of the jar as you're pouring. Most of the coffees you strain out this way should be an absolute breeze. Only the last one you make (assuming a bigger jar) should give you any ...


5

When the water has too short of a time to extract the flavor from the bean. Try grinding the beans a bit smaller.


5

This may be off topic because it is opinion-based and hypothetical in nature. There may be some merit however because it is presented with a "fair and impartial tone" and invites experiences over opinions that may be backed up with references. Especially in the world of coffee, where brewing methods are identified by brands, it is hard to not talk about ...


4

The quite-foolproof method I found best for daily use. Result is, as far as I can taste, indistinguishable from a reasonabe espresso. Crema starts disappearing a bit faster than from presso machine, use smaller cup if you want it to hold longer. Coffee choice helps, but most important factors can be reduced to keeping the roast fresh and adding some robusta ...


4

Actually the answer will be completely dependent on the coffee you're using, how finely it's ground, and how dark it's roasted. I read on a roaster's site (I'll try to find the reference) that acidic flavors come out first, sweet compounds second, and bitter flavors last when brewing. The trick is to stop the extraction before you get the bitter flavors. ...


4

I'm not exactly sure if this is accurate, but I think it has to do with flavor extraction. When you brew with a filter, the water is going to fall through the grounds too fast to actually develop good flavor. Sure, you'll get coffee, but you're only giving the water enough time to take the more bitter tastes with it. I have this same problem with my coffee....


4

What do you mean by improve? French press is one of the most popular brewing methods in the world, and rightly so: it's dead easy to operate and produces a great cup of coffee. The mechanism is very simple and easy to clean, a good french-press pot will last years if not decades, and if any part of it breaks it's cheap and easy to replace. What improvements ...


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