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8

That sounds like the generalization that drip or pour over brewing is better for light roasts and stronger brewing methods are better for darker roasts. I'll counter that by saying that I often use my Aeropress for lighter roasts and my Clever Dripper for dark roasts and those cups come out just fine. The Aeropress makes a sort of quasi-espresso cup ...


7

These grooves are for improving the flow of coffee through the filter. The grooves create space between the filter and the cone to permit little channels for the coffee to flow into the vessel after passing through the filter paper. I think the ridges also help "wick" the coffee away from the filter paper, helping the filter paper drain better. If the ...


7

Short version: The Hario brand filters are thinner than other paper filters and seem to have more texture than other types of filters. I assume this has some, but perhaps slight, impact on the rate at which water passes through the filter and also what "stuff" passes through the filter, which impacts the resulting brew and its taste. Longer version: The ...


6

The main difference between the ceramic and plastic V60 is heat retention. The ceramic will retain heat and can be pre-warmed, creating a stable temperature. Depending on who you are this may not make a huge difference but I prefer the ceramic as I feel the plastic sucks some heat out of the water/coffee. The other reason I prefer ceramic is for cleaning ...


4

This could depend on the brand of filters and the brewing method so it's worthwhile (and fun) to do the experiment. I'd love to see results from more experimenters. Bamboo vs. Paper Filters: I did this experiment. We only had three tasters but the results were statistically significant at the 5% standard -- all three of us could taste the difference. The ...


4

Here's a few more things to add to @fredley's answer. Since the water is going to be in contact with the grounds for a longer time (1- using greater volume of water, and 2- Chemex filter will be slower) you're going to get more of the bitter notes that you get (in general) by using a longer brewing time. Acidity will be offset somewhat by the bitterness. I ...


3

As they are two different methods of brewing, it is normal that they taste different. One very clear difference is the temperature of the water. Moka pots practically use water/steam. This let's the extraction happen in a warmer environment than recommended. Additional bitter notes of the bean is also extracted. More importantly, you loose some aromatics as ...


3

It sounds like the main thing you're not carefully controlling for is temperature. I have found that if I use cooler temperatures (80-92 degrees celsius) for my pour-over, I get very bright/acidic tones. Hotter water (92-100 degrees celsius) always gives me more bitterness and earthy flavors. I use an electric kettle with a thermometer to maintain the ...


3

So there are two main differences between the Chemex and V60: The V60 has a much finer filter than the Chemex, so extraction is much faster through the V60 filter, and more oils/solids come through. The V60 also has ridges, allowing coffee to easily pass through the filter evenly, rather than all having to exit through the bottom - washing out the grounds ...


2

To add onto the previous answer, the main difference is indeed heat retention and cleaning. The ceramic will hold heat longer and is easier to clean. It is also more breakable. I recently wrote a blog post reviewing another Hario model, the Hario V60 Copper, and another thing to keep in mind is that the more expensive ceramic, glass or metal Hario models ...


1

Agreed with the above answer by Jason: it's about taste. That said, of late i have been surprised by how effective for extractin Scott Rao's 97degree C is for a pour over[link].In particular it seems that central and south american beans need the temp to get out the flavour - african's less so but still work in that range. But to your question - a more ...


1

My goodness - all sorts of new gadgets to get intrigued about - and now - you have a reason to buy BOTH sizes of acaia scales! a pearl for the base and a lunar for the pot! for me this double weighing is to check saturation of water by beans - seems like this device could make this process reuqire fewer steps. For instance - i like to make sure i'm ...


1

The bitter compounds in coffee are less soluble in water than the other flavor compounds we like, so we can use that to keep the bitterness to a minimum. In brewing; water temperature, length of contact with the grinds, and fineness of ground are the main factors you can control to keep bitterness to a minimum. Here are a few explanations that might help: ...


1

You'll definitely get a less bitter and possibly sour (underextracted) brew when dividing up one 40g dose between two V60s if you don't adjust the grind. As you point out, the lower contact time of the 20g of grinds will lead to less extraction, and thus less bitterness, and possibly under extraction. This is just a characteristic of pour-over brews (as ...


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