12

Disclaimer: This will be a long answer. I expect that it wont be as good as I want at first. I may make corrections/additions afterwards. I am a native Turkish, drinking kgs of coffee each week and from a coffee addicted family for generations. Therefore, I count myself as a Turkish-coffee hobbyist. I believe to understand the two or three times boiling ...


8

The amount of oil in your coffee correlates to what is called the "body"? This is the "fullness" that you feel of the coffee in your mouth. Like the difference between a light cake and fudgey brownie. More oil means more body. You get more body from brewing methods which, like you said, do not use a filter. This includes things like french press. The amount ...


8

Nice question. A similar myth has been arisen for Turkish coffee pot; such as it should be cleaned only with water to keep the greasy surface made with coffee oil. Partly correct, partly not. According to my "Barista's manual" from Lavazza, this sedimented oil may acetify. Thus, end up bad flavor. Again, (I cannot remember the source) as of my knowledge, ...


8

...also called Arabic, Cypriot, Bosnian, and what not -- it is the same method. In Greece, it's become Greek coffee (along with the former "Turkish" Greek delight) after conflicting with Turkey and the 1974 invasion of Cyprus. The method itself (boiling finely ground coffee in copper cezve, typically sweetened, and served in a demitasse) is said to stem ...


7

Assuming that: you have found the best available beans in your market. which are then finely grounded and used instantly after the grounding (have in mind the finer the grounding the faster the coffee taste deteriorates as it both absorbs humidity and all smells from the environment with it and in the same time releases its aroma). You can look for: ...


7

You should heat your coffee upto about 70 degrees Celcius so it builds a foam or froth but do not let it boil! You need to keep it at this stage for as long as you can, and if the coffee starts to get to hot and appears to rise then move it off the heat and repeat at most 2 times. A few important things are use fresh coffee or it will not foam as well pre-...


6

If you mean the products you see at a grocer, the answer is simply grind. "Turkish coffee" is a finer grind setting than espresso, so that the final product very closely resembles dust. "Italian coffee" is likely either espresso ground to be used with an espresso machine or literally "imported from Italy". Turkish coffee is for use with a special, Turkish ...


6

There are many things to consider. It is not really important whether it is copper or not. (Copper is for tourists in Turkey and generally of bad quality.) I advise you to choose a stainless steel one. If you choose copper, find a real thick copper one. Here, you can see a very good, thick copper cezve that I encountered. However, this is quite expensive (...


5

Disclaimer: Frankly, since I was registered to this site, I was thinking on answering this very question. So, here you will see the answer in a while. Most of you very probably will not like it. Still, I will also disclose the fact how you like it at first place. That's all science of coffee. It's widely known that, historically Turkey is one of the hubs of ...


4

I'm not exactly sure if this is accurate, but I think it has to do with flavor extraction. When you brew with a filter, the water is going to fall through the grounds too fast to actually develop good flavor. Sure, you'll get coffee, but you're only giving the water enough time to take the more bitter tastes with it. I have this same problem with my coffee....


3

In all coffee-brewing methods, consistency is key. Different particle sizes of coffee will extract at different rates and controlling extraction rates and replicating them is part of making better and better cups of coffee. The Rafino seems to be tailored more towards the filter or french press brewer. In these brewing methods, fines, the smaller coffee ...


3

I, being a native Turkish and experienced Turkish coffee drinker for my life, quite conservative about this. There will be some major problems on producing the genuine Turkish-style with a syphon. The extraction process is made by heat, not by pressure in Turkish coffee. So, syphon is not what it is intended for. Two (or even three) times is quite correct ...


3

I believe the answer will be subjective. But, I can answer based on some tradition and history. The coffee beans were originated from Yemen in Ottoman Empire. At least, Yemen was a hub. (This fact is even mentioned in folk songs. See here and here.) Historically, Robusta beans were not around, yet. Americas were not explored. So, if you want to follow the ...


2

I would like to excuse and interrupt this thread kindly as an experienced native drinker. The supplied link in @William Moore's answer requires sugar. The continuous misunderstanding about sugar usage with Turkish brewing in North America is so surprising to me. In Turkey, regular Turkish coffee drinkers hardly –if not never‒ drink their coffee with sugar. ...


2

Please do not confuse Arabic coffee with Turkish coffee. Arabic coffee, called gahwah is something completely different than Turkish coffee ... which is called Turkish coffee in the Middle East. It has completely different coloration and is also served differently. It is also not sweet. Wikipedia explains it thus: Arabic coffee, or ‘‘Al-Qahwa’’ (Arabic:...


2

The only disadvantage that I see from drinking coffee is that you don't have the time to drink tea! At the age if 68, I average 6-8 cups of coffee daily, and have done so for the past 50 years or so. My current job, I got bored with retirement, now averages 35 - 40 hours per week involving continuously standing, bending, stretching, and walking an ...


2

This is coming a bit late but I hope it helps others. First off, I've tasted coffees made with both Lavazza Quality Oro and BonCafe beans. Both are rubbish. Honestly. Try some freshly roasted coffee and you'll know the difference. Having said that, let's move on. What you've described in the question is talking mainly about extraction. Coffee gets extracted ...


2

If Cezve is made of copper, please get rid of it as soon as possible. Copper Oxide is quite poisonous. They are generally plated with tin after production. If you try to fix it, you may break this plating.


2

I am from Greece and I am still here...So I have a first-hand knowledge! Not all cafes serve Greek coffee and not all coffee shops (the ones they sell coffee beans) sell beans for Greek coffee! But most of them do otherwise the lose 90% of their clientele, in my opinion! Starbucks they don’t have Greek coffee on their menu and NOBODY would ask for Greek ...


2

I found this detailed article by an expert titled "how to make and drink Greek coffee" that seems to rather confirm your understanding of the matter: I remember when I was the Food and Beverage Director for Starbucks in Greece and we were launching the first store in Greece back in 2002, we had to serve Greek coffee in the store. Apparently there is a law ...


1

Mırra is a specialty Turkish coffee brewing variety that's known to be very bitter. The beans are roasted very dark to prepare the bitter possible coffee flavor. Furthermore, during Turkish brewing process, the grounds are boiled* for minutes (and legendarily up to hours) to produce a bitter flavored coffee. The end result is a very dark and intense ...


1

As far as I understood, such coffee is ground for Turkish. If this is the case, you may try to prepare your coffee in a pot. If you are really considering (somewhat) automated machine, you may go for Turkish coffee machines. Keep in mind, that they don't prepare coffee as good as an experienced human; but they are nice enough to drink. I put an image of one ...


1

Based on the cezve shown by @IgorTatarnikov, I can say the options are really limited. The cezve presented here is an electrical Turkish coffee pot with proper quality. Decoction brewing technique (mixing grounds and water together, then heat them up) and their alternatives are the only ones you can do. Worse, you cannot slow down heating in an electrical ...


1

I still think this is very subjective. Still, some facts may help. Brazilian Santos is the most commonly used beans in Turkey for Turkish coffee. However, it is not my favorite. Other people may like it a lot. Santos is something like a mixture of many varieties, though its taste may fluctuate a lot with respect to your sources. The main reason that it is ...


1

There is no recipe for preparing a perfect blend. Before beginning, please read this somewhat relevant question first: What are the basics of creating an espresso blend? I, personally, prefer to use Ethiopian Harrar single origin beans, light-to-medium roasted. However, this may all depend. When you go to a commercial Turkish firm, they mostly consume Dos ...


1

Whatever you do, Turkish brewing mostly reflects the proper technique. Still, if you really consider temperature stability as your first concern; there is something you can do. Try to keep the temperature of the cezve intact. To do so, you need lots of metal to evenly share and distribute the thermal capacity. But... Turkish coffee brewing must be done so ...


1

Similar to what @hoc_age said, the metal might be too old and too easy to melt under high heat. A old and leaking cezve is usually best thrown out to avoid any future leaks and cleanups. Buy a newer version with high heat resistant if the metal is melting too easily. Really it sounds to me that the cevze is a little too old and has been used too much so it ...


1

I can confirm that the supermarket-variety Turkish/Greek/Serbian etc coffee is usually prepared from the worst beans they can find, but there is something in the flavor of ready-ground coffee that is hard to replicate with your own beans (supposedly the secret ingredient is cinnamon but i cannot confirm if adding a stick of cinnamon to the grind will do the ...


1

It has always been Arabic. However, the World met the coffee you mentioned through Ottoman Empire, a Turkish country. It became Turkish Coffee. Some Turkish stuff is known as Greek too. Let me say, Turkish/Greek delight, Turkish/Greek yoghurt and Turkish/Greek coffee.


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