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26

Hand grinders will work without electricity. You can generally get a conical hand grinder cheaper than you can get an electric one. They also create less noise than a electric grinder. Hand grinders will generally produce less heat than an electric (may affect bean flavor). Many grinders are lighter and smaller than electric ones. They are portable ...


14

First, lets ignore blade grinders entirely. Any grinder that doesn't have a motor will be relatively quiet. You'll be at the mercy of the crunching beans, but that's it. Add to this that the more the grinder weighs, or the more "heft" it has to it, the quieter it will typically be due to the additional mass damping any vibration. When adding a motor to ...


14

The main reason for different grinds is the different brewing processes. If the water is exposed to the grounds for a very short amount of time (e.g., 10-15 seconds for espresso), you need a finer grind to provide enough surface area to extract the coffee from the beans. If the brewing time is long (e.g., the ~4 minutes of french press), you need a coarse ...


12

Short reason: Tradition conflicting with modern brewing practices. Long reason: This is more a result of an industry-wide legacy when purchasing equipment, where coffee shop owners will pick up mechanically dosed grinders instead of doserless, or electrically metered models because "that's how it's been done," or because the technology simply wasn't ...


10

That's pretty straightforward: if you're not too lazy and have the equipment at hand, always grind only the amound needed just before brewing. Check out this answer for impressive data. Now if your beans are year old already, this might not make a huge difference --- but there's no way that grinding it all at once could help you have ``somewhat fresh cups''...


10

4M is a term mainly used among Italians for espresso. It is a placeholder for four words that start with "M" in Italian that affects espresso preparation. Some information can be found here. These M's are: Miscela: The coffee-blend; it covers the selection and blending of the beans as well as proper roasting. Macinazione: The grinder; proper grinding of ...


9

When grinding coffee, the particle size of the resulting powder can be described with a bell curve, whose width (and thus, the powder consistency) varies on mostly the roast and the grinding method. A manual grinder with adjustable grinding size will produce a more consistence powder, whereas electric grinders (especially the cheaper household ones) will ...


7

The most important distinction between blade and burr grinders is the result: Blade Coffee beans circulate across the spinning blades. No matter how long or short the grind, there is extreme heterogeneity in particle size--that is, you will find larger bean fragments with near-dust-size ones, with everything in between. If you use a pour-over or drip ...


7

Short answer: Slowly. Binary search. But for espresso, Turkish, moka, or AeroPress: I adjust mine to nearly the tightest (smallest) setting possible that still allows me to turn the crank without difficulty. Method: This is how I adjust mine. Approximate the setting by eye. Looking at the burrs, gauge about how large you'd like your grounds to be. Mark ...


7

It looks like a burr grinder, as opposed to a blade grinder. Burr grinders give a more consistent grind size, which is why they're preferred over blade grinders. My guess is it's made of steel, but it does look tarnished. You might take it apart and polish it to create a smoother grinding surface. The wood on the inside might be difficult to clean of ...


6

You can use a blade grinder for nuts and spices as well, provided that the 'chamber' and blades are 100% stainless steel. It's pretty easy to clean the oils that would otherwise affect your next batch of beans. That's not the case with a burr grinder, especially the ceramic variety - a hand-full of hazelnuts in one of those will mean anything coming out of ...


6

Blade grinders are a bit easier to clean. Generally you can simply wash out inside and it doesn't require the disassembly cleaning a burr grinder does. Blade grinders are also less likely to be damaged by inappropriate use or coffee that contains foreign objects (it's been known to happen as urban myth).


6

I wouldn't go so far as to say that it's not a very high-quality grinder, it does extremely well for the price. The clumping is an artifact of: Humidity Heat from grinding Type and roast of the bean Grinders that produce almost no heat while grinding, to the point that they do it reliably enough for it to be a listed feature cost ten times the amount that ...


6

(Note: With a general perspective, you may classify coffee as a spice.) I imagine you mention the hand grinders. In that case, the main difference is the size of the canals of the grinders. E.g. in a black pepper grinder, the average diameter of the canals are a bit wider than the average diameter of black peppers. However, this diameter is far narrower ...


6

No it's not a problem. Producers know that people at home often single dose their coffee, so I assume they consider that when producing a grinder (in fact most coffee shops that do pour over grind single doses as well). Maybe in some manuals it's written that you shouldn't let it run empty on very fine settings, but that's more to avoid warranty claims than ...


5

WholeLatteLove.com actually provides decibel ratings for many of their coffee grinders such as the Mazzer Mini. Perhaps you could compare some grinders there.


5

A manual coffee grinder like the "Hario Ceramic Coffee Mill".


5

Yes, high end grinders are generally adjustable. Some even have macro and micro adjustments. For example the Baratza Vario grinder Hand grinders are also adjustable, and provide a good grind. See the Hario range The larger commercial grinders are sometimes aimed more at bulk output than at a precise and consistent grind. They grind the coffee very quickly,...


5

In your title, you mention grind consistency. This is different from but related to grind size - an inconsistent grind (such as a whirling-blade type "grinder") will have sizes all over the map, from dust to half a bean. The dust will be over-extracted, and the half-a-bean won't contribute much flavor at all. A consistent grind (one with particles in a ...


5

"Using more or less beans in a single grinding session" will yield the most bang for buck, usually. However, this is highly dependent on your particular rotary grinder. Rotary grinders are like miniature blenders. Just like in a full size blender trying to make a milkshake or something, if you over- or under-fill the blender, then the blade won't be able ...


5

Expanding comment into a (possible) answer... On the topic of different beans in a burr grinder: I find that my (admittedly cheap) burr grinder "chokes" on darker-roast beans. When I put dark roast beans into the grinder, the chute gets clogged with coffee grounds more quickly (as compared to lighter-roasted beans). I have a timer-based auto-shutoff model, ...


5

You should always grind your beans just before brewing. Also keep the beans in an airtight bag. When you grind the beans you increase the surface of your coffee beans which means the area in contact with air is increased. Oxygen is a very reactive molecule that takes part in the formation of peroxides and free fatty acids. Both of these result in an awful ...


5

For the LIDO grinders, burr drag, grinding, or touching is likely due to misalignment. Misalignment is more likely an assembly issue than a manufacturing issue since the burrs are machined. This means you can fix your Orphan Espresso LIDO on your own, with some handiwork and know-how. When I received my Lido E, the burrs would contact each other at anything ...


5

Actually, this question is self explanatory. I assume you only need some guidance and confirmation for what's going wrong. A better known fact is: if your coffee is underextracted, it tastes sour. if your coffee is overextracted, it tastes bitter. Now, let's tie up this to grind size: if your grounds are finer, your coffee overextracts if other ...


4

The most important differences I think, are time and temperature. I really don't know much technical details about grinders, but as @luser-droog said, friction will create heat and it will affect the coffee (so, motor grinders can be affected by this if doesn't manage heat dissipation well) And of course, in all cases, time matters; so, time might be a ...


4

From what I can tell, you're grind is rather coarse for a pour-over. You should have a grind the size of kosher salt for most drippers. Perhaps its personal taste, and I cannot argue that. However, it's typically recommended you start with this grind size and adjust to your preference. As far as my own experience both working as a barista for a few years, ...


4

The Problem with Consumer Burr grinders Burr grinders (that aren't of a very high or industrial quality) generally do not produce even grinds. I usually recommend a spinning blade grinder to the home barista for this reason. Evaluating Your Grinds You indicated that you will be using a drip machine with a paper filter. In my opinion, based on what I can ...


4

From the book Coffee: A Guide to Buying, Brewing, and Enjoying, I remember reading that if you use flavored coffee beans in a burr grinder, that flavor is not going to come out, ever. But with a blade grinder you can grind flavored beans, clean it out, and use it again with unflavored beans. They take up less space than the burr mills than I've seen. An ...


4

Your question has the statement that your blade grinder results in grounds that are equal or superior to the hand grinder in terms of texture. This is generally not true. There was a time when I would have agreed with you until a change in my brew method showed me otherwise. When using my Aeropress inverted, when I began to allow the grounds to extract ...


4

Though it may not result in any substantial difference in the coffee, hand grinding provides a more analog experience. Speaking just for my self, I enjoy the hands on approach. It certainly takes more time than an electric grinder, but if you're just grinding for a single cup of French Press or Areopress, it's not that much longer. In general, though, a ...


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