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43

In a cool, dark, dry, place and whenever possible vacuum sealed. The oils in roasted coffee degrade as they are exposed to air (oxidization) as well as heat. As with just about any foodstuff moisture accelerates the spoiling process as well. You should store your coffee in completely sealed, insulated, opaque containers. If you have the ability, vacuum pump ...


33

Whole Bean Coffee Degradation Over Time Whole bean coffee will go stale within 14 days - on average. The graph below shows the quick 1.5 standard deviation drop in quality within the first 14 days (marked in red). *See note below for details Staling in the context of coffee has a commonly agreed on definition - the loss of volatile aromatic compounds and ...


22

The flavor constituents of roasted coffee are the result of high roasting temperatures. After roasting, they continue to be affected by environmental factors, their own natural instability, and interaction with other compounds. The most important of these processes are: Dissipation into other media. Aromatics evaporate from the surface of the coffee into ...


22

No. In fact it's likely to make your coffee taste bad, and gum up your grinder. You should store your coffee in an air-tight container, at or just below room temp (about 25 degrees Celsius). Coffee can and will absorb all kinds of odors, and while your freezer probably doesn't smell like much, there are odors that will (at the minimum) dull the taste of ...


17

According to the Aeropress manual: Remove the cap and set it aside. Push the plunger to eject the "puck" of spent grounds into the trash. Rinse and/or brush away any grounds left on the rubber seal. The seal has already wiped your chamber clean, so no further cleanup is needed. Always eject the puck right after brewing, and store your ...


15

Coffee should never be stored in the fridge! In the same way that baking soda absorbs smells, coffee will absorb smells and flavors in your refrigerator. These compounds can be extracted when you brew your coffee and will contribute to undesired flavors. Proper storage of coffee is to put your beans into an airtight container, and store around 25C out of ...


14

I would add to not store it in the refrigerator or freezer. It would fare better at room temperature and dry than cold where it could be exposed to food smells and moisture. You didn't ask, but also drink it as soon as possible if it's ground. Whole beans will keep for awhile but ground coffee will start to go stale very quickly, even if stored properly. ...


12

The biggest chemical change that is going to occur is going to be oxidation. Oxidation Chemically, oxidation is defined as the following from this source. Oxidation is any reaction in which one or more electrons are moved from one chemical to another, producing two different compounds. Specifically related to coffee, oxidation is further elaborated ...


11

In general, it's best to not store ground coffee. If quality really matters, then the real answer is to back up. Try to grind only enough coffee for what you're using immediately to brew with. If you're buying preground coffee, then storage and optimal quality become somewhat trivial. Once the surface area of the coffee is increased (by grinding it), the ...


9

Coffee beans are freshest from about 12 to 48 hours after roasting until maybe one or two weeks later when stored properly in an airtight container. During the early portion of this period (immediately after roasting to three or four days later) beans will be still giving off some gases, thus the reason for one way valves on coffee bags. That being the ...


9

This is a perfectly good idea, if you freeze the coffee as cubes and plan to use them to chill your iced coffee without watering it down. If you plan to simply freeze the coffee for drinking later I can imagine it being a bad idea, because you will lose some of the flavor. If you even poured milk or cream into the coffee you're planning to freeze, I would ...


9

Room temperature, open-air is fine (for a while) "Micro-roasted" implies that you purchased the beans where the roasting was performed on premises. That means it was probably roasted recently, within a couple of days. Roasts vary, but generally a bean will remain fresh for a week or two, open-air, room temperature from the time of roasting. One person might ...


9

The Short answer to this is no. You should not use a glass jar for storing coffee. Why? The base of the answer can be found here: When Does Coffee Go Off? Coffee goes stale relatively quickly, and the transfer to a glass jar will: Increase the coffee's interaction and exposure to oxygen Increase the coffee's exposure to light, which will cause ...


8

I value sealed over opaque. Go for the sealed glass. Opaque is not really the goal, but rather in the dark. Keeping the stuff in a dark location, even in a clear container, will be fine. As far as priorities for storage in general, according to the USA National Coffee Association (and others including Blue Bottle and a lengthy missive from The Atlantic), ...


7

My experience is that some jar lids are almost impossible to make completely odorless, while the glass simply needs to be soaked in a mixture of baking soda and vinegar for a few hours. I have even read that leaving the jar in the sun for a few days works efficiently, but since we don't have that much sun in my part of the world i have never tried this ...


7

It's actually a one-way valve & it's critical to the shelf life of the coffee and the preservation of the bag itself. When coffee is fresh roasted, it releases carbon dioxide. It's basically a by-product of the roasting process. When the coffee is ground, carbon dioxide is released expeditiously. If you simply place fresh roasted coffee in a ...


7

So there are a fair few, well, questionable claims on that page, and some downright contradictions: One Year of Friis Freshness Valves included, to vent freshness damaging CO2 gases CO2 gasses are not 'freshness damaging'. CO2 is, to all intents and purposes, inert in this context. The only gas you really care about when freshness is concerned is Oxygen. ...


7

There are a few factors at play here. The temperature that the coffee is brewed at and how well the flask holds that temperature are primary. While the coffee stays hot the caffeine level will decrease. The speed will depend on the temperature and the amount of caffeine to start with (which is thoroughly discussed in other questions here). When the coffee ...


7

I have a few different varieties of green beans that I have stored in freezer style plastic bags for going on 1+ year now and there is no mold present. I keep them stored at room temperate with as much air as possible removed from the bag. I roast a few batches a year and always get the same results out of my beans regardless of how long they have been ...


7

Yes, there is a way to store freshly roasted coffee - or even store bought roasted beans - at home under vacuum without expensive equipment. I drink wine and have collected a couple of wine storage devices over the years that I no longer use. One of these is a bottle stopper with a one-way valve in the top and a vacuum pump for removing the air from a ...


7

Caffeine has a very very low vapor pressure 9.0X10-7 mm Hg at 25 deg C. Source Almost none would evaporate.


6

It doesn't actually matter! The valve on the bag is there to let gas out without letting gas in. The reason for this is that freshly roasted beans will continue to give off a bit of CO2 for a little while. Coffee that's packaged immediately after roasting will give off a bit in the bag, hence the need for a valve. Oxygen causes coffee to go off, which is ...


6

When I worked in a coffee shop and we prepared a beverage similar to an iced latte, we always mixed the milk in with the chilled espresso. Keep in mind this was a beverage prepared ahead of time and not server to the client right away. We NEVER added dairy to espresso and then chilled it for later. It has been shown that 1 liter of milk can develop harmful ...


6

You are quite right - the flavouring does indeed change the shelf life in a certain way. It is necessary to look at this from two perspectives. Shelf Life by Safe Consumption: The flavouring compounds used to flavour coffees last longer without degrading. This means that they ARE NOT the limiting factor when it comes to the shelf life of a coffee. ...


6

Its nothing but a marketing gimmick, enabling the user to use the degassing ventilation hole as aroma hole. If the coffee is super fresh you will be smelling a very bad gas while squeezing the coffee bag, but this is rarely the case as many consumer coffee products have been laying in the shelfs for more than one week.


6

Generally, there is the Rule of 15. Green coffee lasts fresh for 15 months, roasted (stored in an opaque, air-tight, slightly-below-room-temp container) 15 days and ground 15 minutes. This applies mainly to specialty coffee since it has the most aromas and tastes. Even if you open a bag of beans and do not grind them, once the air reaches the beans you ...


6

Freezing will not affect the coffee beans chemically. Thawing may affect them though. When you thaw the beans, small amounts of water (that were frozen as small amounts of air humidity) will melt and it may collect together and cause some very small extractions in the bean. This is probably quite minimal due to the fact that you have vacuum packed the beans ...


5

Freezing coffee is fantastic, but only if you do it correctly, and if it's not going to be consumed within the first 2-3 months after the roast date. It's surprising how much fragrance and flavor is kept when done correctly even after sever months past roast. If you freeze coffee, make sure it's as air tight as possible. Ideally you would want to vacuum seal ...


5

A short answer is "not significantly", assuming you just store your drink for the day, and there is no sharp changes in storage conditions (strong heat, freeze, etc.)---except warming up the amount you want to drink. Coffee drinks are unstable, though, and a simple, freshly passed drip coffee tastes different (quality changes) with time. So quality will ...


5

What I usually do is to place the degased beans (30hours after roasting) in a nitrogen atmosphere. I did a couple of experiments to check whether this is working, namely mass-spectrometry on the brewed coffee. Although this does not directly link to the taste, it confirms my theory that the nitrogen atmosphere conserves the solubles in the coffee for a ...


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