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11

It boils down to taste - some people even chew whole beans. Safety-wise there are no concerns1 and the method you propose is not unheard of, it goes by the term "Cowboy coffee" and others. Some preparation methods even quickly boil the grounds and water (Turkish coffee), other sources warn against pouring boiling water over your grounds and suggest letting ...


11

How instant coffee is prepared in the factory: Coffee beans are roasted They are ground very finely (0.5 mm - 1.1 mm in diameter) The ground coffee is mixed with water in percolation columns which reaches 155 - 180 degrees Celsius. This is the extraction process. This mixture is then concentrated and/or dried using vacuum evaporation, freeze drying, or ...


9

There's an answer to this question at Seasoned Advice: see What water temperature should be used for instant coffee? A brief summary, taken from @PatrickSebastien's answer: Use water at whatever temperature you like to drink your coffee at, or Use water just below boiling, around 95-99 degrees Celsius (~205-210 F). Other articles like this one from ...


8

With instant coffee, you are not "practically eating the beans;" you are drinking reconstituted dried coffee. To create instant coffee granules, the manufacturer first brews the coffee using conventional methods and then either freeze-dries or spray-dries the coffee to create a soluble powder form. Dried coffee. The amount of caffeine in the instant coffee ...


8

Being someone who was involved in the manufacturing process, instant coffee is made with the cheapest possible grains, always. Doesn't matter if you think Nestlé is good they do choose the cheapest way to produce, I am not sure if this is the case everywhere in the world, this is coming from Argentina, but I'm pretty certain it is the case. What you get in ...


7

I'd agree with you. There isn't a brew happening because the solution was already created. What you are performing is a rehydration. However, "let me rehydrate some coffee" is a pretty awkward turn off phrase.


7

Seems like a bad way to start a day to me. This method will over brew the coffee and give it a gritty texture (especially at the bottom) but as the other poster have mentioned it really just boils down to taste. Experimentation is the only way to find out what you like. To what I think is the deeper point of the question. How can I drink coffee without time ...


7

Because the taste and aroma are horrible. I've been places (for instance Shanghai and Beijing) where it's hard to get a cup of coffee outside of business areas catering to foreigners. The instant coffee is terrible. It is not a pleasure to drink. It's only palatable (to me) with a ton of evaporated milk and a lot of sugar. For someone who usually drinks ...


6

Instant coffee suffers from a number of drawbacks that put it on the far end of the spectrum from well raised and processed, properly roasted and freshly ground coffee. To start with, instant coffee is usually made from the cheapest and lowest quality beans. These beans are then (usually) roasted and brewed on large industrial equipment. The coffee is ...


6

With all foods, FAT TOM is your best start to gauge their susceptibility to spoilage. Now, FAT TOM is actually an acronym for the six factors that influence the growth of microbes. And bacterial growth is what causes food to turn bad in two senses, namely gross and dangerous, although the two often go hand in hand. The factors are: Food Acidity Time ...


4

There are absolutely no safety problems here. For reference, what you are describing actually was THE method of brewing coffee before the invention of filters! (See for example the wikipedia article, especially the part about "Boiling".) Also this is basically equivalent to a preparation with the french press, with the only difference being that ...


4

Those sound like single-serving packets; they are probably intended for a single "cup" of coffee -- somewhere between 150mL - 250mL (5 fl. oz. - 8 fl. oz), depending on how strong you prefer your coffee. Volumetrically, instant coffee is usually on the order of 5-10 mL (1-2 tsp) coffee powder per cup, and this sounds like it's about the same. I'd suggest ...


4

Apparently some instant coffee varieties include parts of the plants including stems, bits of leaves, etc. Source: 2006 documentary Black Gold (IMDB page).


4

Unlikely that you will run into any problems, although chemically they won't behave the same way. Instant coffee completely dissolves while the ground coffee will be in there as solid pieces that soak up some water and add taste. I assume the total amount of coffee used is just too little to affect the composition of the dough very much. You could however ...


4

The most sensible solution is to throw it out. Instant coffee is hygroscopic, it will absorb moisture from the air if possible. I guess either someone was sloppy when scooping out the instant coffee and used a wet spoon or the container was not airtight (either bad packaging design or because a careless user didn’t close the pack properly). Now add high ...


3

This question is fairly ambiguous as you've simply described the result as a 'desired taste' so I cannot tackle the question from a specific angle. However, the differences you describe may be a symptom of the fact that there are big differences between instant coffee and your pour-over. Actual coffee. Your pour-over must be done with coffee grounds and so ...


3

I have noticed the same thing. I believe it occurs because minute gas particles in the instant coffee, trapped during the production process, are suddenly released. This gas (air or something inert) rises to the top and bubbles or foams. It dissipates immediately, unlike crema. I don't think it's caused by any physical chemistry stuff, like heat from ...


3

Caffeine content varies greatly by preparation and brew method. Instant coffee is generally designed to produce something close to a cup of drip coffee. "Cups" is unfortunately not well defined and may vary based on it's usage. Beyond that, percolated and french press coffee is generally prepared stronger (more concentrated) that regular drip coffee (and ...


3

I've been that person - I kept ground coffee forever. The difference in taste between fresh and old ground coffee is enormous, but so is the difference between old grounds and instant. It's just a completely different beverage, so I would say if these are your two options, it's just a matter of personal taste (I would go for old grounds). If you're up for ...


3

I have just made one batch with Xylitol: Other websites also recommend Erythritol - which isn’t surprising, considering that both are sugar alcohols. (Note that both can have a laxative effect, individual tolerance varies.) Apparently the (non-)sugar granules aren’t even required, I have seen (albeit not tested myself) recipes that use liquid sweeteners, e....


2

It's likely better to completely dissolve the coffee before adding creamer. I'm inexperienced with instant, but with regular brewed coffee and tea, the addition of cream impedes the brewing/steeping process.


2

Since you want to amplify the taste I would suggest using water that is just about to boil (95°C). I don't have experience with creamer but when I used to drink instant I have always added sugar before water because it helped the coffee to dissolve better. You should experiment with this by using even lower water temperature and watching the dissolution ...


2

I wouldn't say it would amplify it, and you may very well not be able to tell much of a difference. Unless the milk or cream is hot, your coffee won't brew very well (or at least not as fast) on just the milk alone. So by the time you add your hot water, it still shouldn't have dissolved the instant coffee enough to make much of a difference. If you wanted ...


2

This is a bit more complex than it seems at first blush. The reason why instant coffee may have more caffeine than your typical brewed coffee is that it's usually Robusta instead of Arabica coffee. Or some blend of the two. http://www.barkingdogcoffee.com/our-coffee/arabica-vs-robusta/ A cup of joe at Peets, Starbucks, etc, will be made with Arabica beans ...


2

Instant coffee is usually made with robusta beans instead of Arabica beans. Not only are these beans less flavourful and aromatic, but making the coffee beforehand generally allows all of the delicate aromas and notes to escape over time (this is why robusta is used in the first place). There is a reason beans are best ground just before being used.


2

The answer is subjective, and even if we agree on taste, it will still be unclear, because reasons: The instant coffee, unless it's Starbucks or some other name brand, will most likely be made of Robusta varietal beans, which are widely known to taste far worse than the Arabica beans you will find used for pourovers. (Interesting fact: Robusta contains ...


2

Actually, I will change the direction to ground coffee. A few months ago, I have seen a nice solution for campers. I took a photo of it for reference at that time. It seems quite useful to me. However, I mostly prepare my 'tasty' coffee at home and drink 'crap' coffee in the office. So it didn't fit me. Still, here is the invention. A camping style brewer ...


2

As far as I know there are no health concerns about coffee aside from caffeine consumption. Unless there are additives in instant coffee that I'm unaware of then there ought to be no substantive difference between the two (French Press and instant). Instant coffee is simply coffee which was freeze dried either by spraying droplets in the air or crushed ...


2

The process should be quite the same. At least, according to this wholeseller's website. As far as I understand this company sells 100% Arabica or Robusta OEM instant coffee. For example, the well-known Nescafe has several brands for different blends. (I cannot reference these as they are based on many years of aggregated information of myself. I cannot ...


2

Instant coffee is not generally considered to be the epitome of great tasting, or smelling coffee. It's almost the antithesis of artisanal whole bean arabica coffee. The iconic and appealing smell of freshly roasted or brewing coffee is due to arabica coffee. Instant coffee though is mostly, and often completely, made from lower cost robusta beans. Robusta ...


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