17

In fact, it seems that people would drink both from the cup and from the saucer: After being served a hot beverage (e.g., coffee or tea) in a cup on top of a saucer, some would pour a small amount of the beverage onto the saucer, and then drink from the saucer. There's evidence that this was reasonably common into the 20th century, and evidence that some ...


12

You're highlighting two differences between the two methods: temperature of the water, and rate of pouring the water (equivalently, how "full of water" is the cone). Short story: Use water just off the boil (about 96°C / 205°F). I prefer your "slower" pour method over your friend's... read on for why. Longer story: Keeping all other factors identical, ...


12

Temperature affects extraction rate, but also varies between compounds in the coffee beans. Coffee grounds contain a hodgepodge of volatile and non-volatile components, such as various oils, acids, and other aromatic molecules [2]. Collectively, these compounds that are found in coffee grounds are referred to as “coffee solubles” and significantly ...


9

A few other factors to consider: Freshly ground beans. How you store your coffee beans. You basically want to keep them reasonably cool and away from oxygen, sunlight, moisture and variations in temperature (which is why you don't keep them in the freezer except for long term storage). Generally in the pantry in an opaque, air-tight container. I one-way ...


7

This oddity of yours isn't really an oddity. The drinking from the saucer is actually a Swedish tradition. According to this site, it says that: Certainly it's an old tradition in Sweden. You pour the coffee from your cup into the saucer and sip it - usually quite noisily - after blowing a little on it (to cool it). Dricka på fat (drink from a plate, i.e. ...


7

So what I've been taught is that you should keep the lid open while brewing. This is so you can watch the progress of the extraction, and cut the heat at the appropriate time. It gives you much more control over your brew this way - for example, I cut the heat (and run the base under the cold tap for larger pots) as soon as I see the coffee running from the ...


6

I would follow the same guidelines as cow milk when using any alternative milk. For one you really just can't taste a liquid that is scalding hot, so you might as well not go so toasty. Other than that - If you think it tastes great, then keep doing that. If it smells less sweet, it probably is less sweet - you just gotta find that perfect sensory sweet spot....


6

Interesting question. You are not alone when noticing flavor differences with different temperatures of coffee. When cupping coffee in a controlled lab situation for Quality Control purposes, I will often make multiple passes through the cups to taste the differences that are present as the coffee cools. Doing this tells me/us what we need to do while ...


4

If you just keep the fire at low levels, and the lid open, you won't spill coffee all around. That's what I do :) I also noticed a difference in the layer of creme on top of the coffee, with the lid open, for some reason, it produces more creme. Which doesn't make much sense as it reduces the atmospheric pressure.


4

This page on Angels' Cup has (see the middle of the page) a concise summary of the key variables and results in brewing coffee with a given method: If it tastes sour: The problem is under extraction, so adjust brew time longer, or adjust water temp cooler, or adjust grind size finer. If it tastes bitter: The problem is over extraction, so adjust brew time ...


3

Did you try a thermos? There are thermally isolated cups. Also, there are many different types of them. This one, for example, really looks like a miniaturized thermos. This one is a two-fold stainless-steel cup. Maybe better for camping. The trapped air in between two layers keep your coffee warm for a longer period. You can also find prettier looking ...


3

Actually, this answer will eventually boil down to the forecasting of time dependent expected coffee consumption function of your guests. You may expect that, right after a meal or right after they are seated people tend to drink coffee all together at once. Therefore, it is better to keep most (all?) of the pots filled up when you encounter them at first. ...


3

Here comes an unintentionally snarky answer: Flavored coffee and high quality coffee are rarely synonymous. Since flavored coffee masks the organic and natural flavors of the coffee itself, it's rare that a quality bean is used in the first place. Imagine ordering a Glenlivet 18 with Pepsi. Ergo, I'd say that your brew temperature with a flavored coffee ...


3

It certainly won't compare to a steam wand, but yes you can totally get okay milk texture using one. In all honesty though, I've had better success using a french press. Heat milk via stove stop, put your milk into a clean french press, and push and pull the plunge repeatedly until your milk froths. It's not perfect - but good enough to pour some latte art.


3

Well first we should probably establish how cold the water is once it hits the ground. I imagine it is heated to almost boiling temperature in the Nespresso machine, however when it comes out and hits the cold cup it cools down almost immediately to probably 85 to 90°C or something around that. In general colder water means basically that you are extracting ...


2

I would say that room temperature can have an affect on the final outcome of your coffee if the room your in is cold enough. Probably not so much if your sitting in a warm room. I say this because to get a full extraction from your coffee, your water should be between 90°C - 96°C and being in a cold environment can cool that water rather quickly. If you'...


2

The best way to control of shot extraction without adding excessively complicated electronics (if by PID you mean proportional-integral-derivative controller) is: How fine is the bean grounding (the finer the grounding, the higher the density -> the slower the extraction). Applied pressure on the grounded beans in the machine group head (the higher the ...


2

Not sure about the effect on the brewing, but I found out a good reason for the lid. I was brewing some coffee on the stove and had the lid open. The liquid started pouring into the top chamber. "This is great!" I thought, "Why would anyone ever close the lid, you're missing the best coffee fountain show ever?" Then at that moment, the 'last gasp/sputter' of ...


2

Assuming the same beans and roast level, I think the variables that affect the taste most are the freshness at all stages. All other variables make the difference between great and merely good, but they may not affect taste in ways as noticeable as freshness. Freshness at all stages means the roast freshness and the ground freshness, as well as the fruit ...


1

I just got this product called 'coffee joulies'. It's a small 'bean' shaped 'metal thing' (for lack of a better term). the 'bean' contains a phase change material. You place it in your cup when putting the hot coffee in - and it stores up that 'extra' heat (that which makes your cup too hot to drink right away). The phase material will keep the cup ...


1

I tried the "official recommendation" of 170F, but did not like the results. I typically use water at 200F for the AeroPress. It appears there is a wide variety of approaches for the AeroPress. For example, the discussion at coffeegeek runs to more than 300 pages: http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/195166


1

Find some experiments (preparation in fridge, at room temperature and using the "hot bloom" method), including measurement of dissolved solids from the coffee grounds here.


1

Okay, so what if I told you, that I sell a lot of cold brew at my shop, and have had success with 4-hour steeps. I've tried a bunch of stuff, and I've realized that since the temp is really low (mild to cold), it barely makes a difference in TASTE. The biggest factor is oversteeping (like, 48hours up brew), as it can make your cold brew sour. But as a rule ...


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