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20

Here's a quick rundown of the Aeropress method I use every morning. I end up with a relatively crema-y shot. You'd never mistake it for one from an espresso machine, but there's a good layer all across the top. This is completely unscientific and I can't identify which steps here are the relevant ones for the good results, but maybe if you experiment with ...


11

Moka pots (or stove top percolators) usually produce a pressure of around 1.5 bar, while most coffees require a pressure of at least around 6 bar for a crema to appear. However, there are some Moka pots with a special valve (called Cremator) which helps creating more pressures and thus produce a crema. By the way, a real Espresso has to be brewed with a ...


9

There are a few reasons why you might not get a good crema: Stale coffee Coffee not ground fine enough Pressure too low With a steam-powered espresso machine (especially if it's an entry level machine), you will typically not reach high enough pressure to get a proper crema. The crema is formed by oils extracted from the ground coffee, which needs high ...


9

This link from Seasoned Advice might help you. The accepted answer recommends to use an espresso brew pitcher and how to use it. The answer suggests two main things: a vessel with a pour spout helps with retaining the crema; the speed of the pour is important. See more information at that link. It suggests that if you pour it in too fast, you ruin the foam....


7

Hard to diagnose just on the back of a photo, but if I had to guess, I'd say the milk is not "sunk" properly (i.e. the consistency of your espresso is different to that of the milk). This would also explain why the base of the rosetta is a bit "murky". That took me a while to figure out, but I had the same issue (check this out, then compare to this). So in ...


7

The aeropress does not produce crema. There is no where near enough pressure using the aeropress to produce crema. Crema doesn't make coffee better, its typically a sign of good espresso, but isn't found in any other form of brewing nor is it what make the coffee actually taste better. French presses don't create crema either, and its a misleading yet common ...


7

Ok, I'm mega late to the party but sharing's caring so here goes. We've all seen that aeropress sometimes produces a foamy, oily, tasty product on top of its shot and sometimes not. Without entering a geek war of whether this is or isn't traditional crema, let's just assume that this is what the OP wants when talking about crema so we can all be on the same ...


6

You really shouldn't expect to get good crema from the Aeropress. To get a good crema, you need pressure, far more pressure than you are able to generate by hand. I roast my own coffee, so I can brew it within days of roasting. I get a nice foam during the process, but this is different than crema.


6

A higher pressure is fine, as long as it is a controlled variable. You may have to tamp harder or start with a finer grind in order to accommodate the higher pressure. The increase in pressure otherwise would cause a faster brewing time and ergo underextraction of the coffee puck. What's important is that you keep your pressure consistent. An occasional or ...


6

I understand that the crema created by the Brikka is an approximated crema using the gasket's small opening. Sure, purists may not consider this tan, smooth film of microbubbles as authentic crema (akin to espresso makers), but it does do a good job creating it for a close mouthfeel. I use my Brikka every day, and it creates the "Brikkrema" (as I'd like to ...


5

I think you gave a good overview of everything. Here's a few comments on your list that I find is most important from my own personal experience, and from this Bialetti guide. "Moka" grind is imperative. Most guidelines that I have seen recommend somewhere coarser than espresso and finer than drip (e.g., illy, Blue Bottle, and a bunch of blogs when ...


5

You are doing everything perfectly to spec. The problem is neither with your machine, nor with your use of it. It is with the nature of your expectation. Steam espresso machines simply do not produce the crema you are looking for. I would suggest adjusting your expectation to fit the current result, or adjusting the result to fit your expectation. Either buy ...


5

Well, I've heard a lot of "pro tips" and advice having worked around espresso machines for a few years. And I must say, this one is new. I have never heard of warming the coffee itself. I can't imagine that, at the temperature at which the brew head usually resides, many significant changes are made in just a few moments of warming the coffee. The closest I'...


5

From Wikipedia: The "crema" is produced by emulsifying the oils in the ground coffee into a colloid, which does not occur in other brewing methods. Using the right material from the start Personally, I think this definition could use some updating. Crema exists because of the freshness of the coffee, in relation to it's roast. It contains the gasses ...


5

In addition to abby's answer. The freshness of the coffee beans can have a large effect on the amount of crema produced. I've found that beans that are more than 3-4 weeks from the roasting date start to produce less and less crema. As coffee beans age, the oil starts to migrate to the surface of the bean and begins to oxidize (and its the oil in coffee ...


5

Crema is a foam of coffee oils, carbon dioxide- and air bubbles entangled in coffee grounds. (There is an exhaustive Coffeegeek article on the subject.) When extracting coffee using Aeropress, the foam floats up, gets filtered last, and gets trapped in the grounds and paper filter. Use inverted aeropress with something to catch the crema and a stainless ...


5

TL/DR: That's the one: How to Make REAL Espresso With a $20 Aeropress! - Tutorial (YouTube). I have had the aeropress for a couple of years, but only recently I started trying different methods of making coffee. I have run several experiments (I didn't document them. hat's off to andy!), and I have read a lot about what really IS an espresso, and how it's ...


4

The quite-foolproof method I found best for daily use. Result is, as far as I can taste, indistinguishable from a reasonabe espresso. Crema starts disappearing a bit faster than from presso machine, use smaller cup if you want it to hold longer. Coffee choice helps, but most important factors can be reduced to keeping the roast fresh and adding some robusta ...


4

In addition to what have been said by @Stanimiroff, it could be added that, in general, fine cream with, no bubbles*, can be achieved if the steam is used to twirl the milk initially and distribute heat equally in the pitcher without holding it on the surface too long. The bubbles are formed either in the beginning, if you keep the steam on the surface for ...


4

I run two coffee shops and what i have found is there are two ways of keeping the crema nice when pouring it into hot water. You extract the shot with the tip of the portafilter in the hot water(this gives the best result as any fall even short distances breaks the crema) When you poor the shot of espresso into the drink you poor it SLOWLY down the SIDE of ...


4

I hereby copy a very nice statement from the conclusion of Illy & Navarini's survey paper: Most of the data reported in the present review may suggest that espresso brewing can be described as “a quick way to transfer carbon dioxide from roasted and ground coffee to a small cup by means of hot water under pressure”. This then leads to the facts that for ...


3

My wife and I moved to our new house and we have an induction hob installed there. We used our brikka(s) a lot and loved the results. We bought a 4 cup musa for the time being but compared to the brikka it tasted like fermented horse urine. So I decided to experiment: Apparently the head from our 2 cup brikka fits the bottom of the 4 cup musa. It worked! ...


3

Pressurized portafilters either restrict water flow or require a certain buildup of pressure before the espresso spills out the bottom of the portafilter. So there are several problems with that taste-wise in espresso. The resistance is now not in the ground coffee itself, but below it. Additionally, if your coffee is ground finely and uniformly in a good ...


3

To answer this it's important to understand what Crema actually is. Roasted coffee consists of somewhere around a thousand different substances, among which are aromatic oils, sugars, caffein, fiber and carbon dioxide trapped inside the beans. Crema consists mainly of those oils, sugars, some proteins and importantly the CO2 gas trapped inside the bean. ...


3

The CO2 stuck within coffee grounds produce the crema. At least, it is the main substance that forms the crema along with other minor components. This is a very classic problem -and thus a question. If you consider roasting, darker roasts have more crema as they contain more CO2 as the product of Maillard reaction. Here is a proposed previous post to be ...


2

You should make sure that the coffee runs through with at least 6 bar pressure. If your pressure is below that value, you won't get a crema. The recommended pressure for Espresso is 9 bar ± 1, according to the Italian National Espresso Institute.


2

In their famous study on coffee crema, Illy and Navarini states: The key to interpret the several factors affecting the crema, seems to be the carbon dioxide content of roasted coffee in addition to CO2 possibly present as bicarbonate ions in the water ingredient. Most of the data reported in the present review may suggest that espresso brewing ...


2

First things first, the ingredients of the crema is partly the answer of this question. The foam on top of any coffee beverage (espresso, Turkish, aeropress or any other) is formed simply the same. A lipid/water emulsion forms the outer sphere and some gas is inside this sphere. All these spheres stick to each other with tiny coffee bean fragments invisible ...


1

A pressurized portafilter, from what I understand, is a way for an espresso machine that does not provide a high enough amount of pressure (a typical industry grade machine pushes about 9 bars of pressure), and to still be able to emulsify the oils in the coffee - creating crema. First off crema is a terrible interpretation of espresso - use your pallet ...


1

Why do you want to produce crema? Crema tastes quiet terrible if you have ever separated it from an espresso and consumed it. With that said I don't believe you could ever produce true crema with a Moka pot because you simply can't build enough pressure up to emulsify the insoluble oils in the coffee. Hope this helps!


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