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15

tl;dr: Permanent filters win on cost over time. Paper filters win on performance, clean-up, and health. Flavour is personal preference. Composting paper filters and spent grounds alleviates most of the environmental benefit of permanent filter. My conclusion: paper filters, discarded into a compost pile, win hands down. Use of permanent versus one-time-use ...


10

There are many difference between the two filters. In this website. it states that: Today, most white paper filters are whitened with oxygen. Oxygen whitening is much more friendly to the environment, and imparts no taste to the filter. Brown filters are simply unwhitened. Your choice, but oxygen whitened filters are usually less expensive. Brown filters ...


8

Coffee filters are subject to food grade standards. They aren't just convenient shapes and stronger than paper towels, they have substantially less toxins i.e. bleach byproducts such dioxins (strong carcinogen). As well many paper towels have various purfumes, inks and other chemicals only GRAS (generally recognized as safe) for external use on your skin. ...


8

Paper towels!? Knock yourself out! In this answer in Lifehacks.SE, the accepted answer includes instructions to create a coffee filter out of paper towels. The full instrctions: I tried to create a similar filter device with a paper towel and it worked perfectly. Here is what I did: First, make sure you have paper towels... seems foolish to ...


8

I tried making cold brew for the first time recently and I just poured the whole mess through the reusable metal screen filter that came with my cheap drip coffee machine. My drip machine is the style where the top opens to add both coffee and water sort of like this: So I just put the metal filter in and poured the cold brew straight into the filter ...


8

Use a tea infuser! I got a tea infuser with a very fine mesh and put my grounds in that. It holds fewer grounds than I used with the "raw" plunge, but it's much more pleasant to use: I just pluck the floating infuser out of the pitcher and empty the grounds from it. I may get a second filter, or a larger one, but for now I'm content making coffee more often ...


7

I did a little bit of research at the site of inventor of the coffee filter. It's Melitta from Germany. In the german FAQ I found the following: Warum falte ich Filterpapier vor dem Einlegen um? Damit die Kaffeezubereitung optimal funktioniert, muss das Filterpapier genau in die Form des Filters gebracht werden. Dies geschieht, indem Sie die ...


7

This problem seems quite normal. Over time, the little holes are filled up with small coffee grounds and stuck there by the help of glueing force of grease. This grease is extracted during brewing process. So, how could we get rid of these remains? Pretty easy. As they are organic compounds, you should dissolve them. As they include grease, dissolve the ...


5

I've typically used the same cloth filter on a hario syphon for several (2 - 3 probably) months of continuous use (1 or 2 syphons daily). We clean the cloth after each use using a mild detergent, hot water and a soft scrubbing brush. Rinse very well after each wash. Typically, after a week or so we soak the cloth in oxyclean or similar for a couple of hours ...


5

I enjoy my homemade French-pressed coffee more than anything I can buy at an espresso shop, though a long black is my preferred choice if I'm away from home. There are a couple of strengths of the espresso shop's infrastructure which you can emulate on a smaller scale: Good coffee beans Buy good fresh whole beans and grind them right before you prepare ...


4

Due to the fact that this is a lengthy question, I will try to be concise and to the point. In short, yes, all of these main types coffee makers use a different type or size of filter. Sometimes each type can use a different filter. I will provide a non-exhaustive list of filter types for these coffee makers which you have listed. Although the list in non-...


4

I love good strong coffee. To lose flavor is a deal breaker. I tried the gold mesh filter and it is un-acceptable to me. I went back to paper. I was told that because of the screen mesh bottom the permanent filter (like the one I had) has, the hot water doesn't stay with the coffee long enough. It passes right through. Whereas the paper holds it longer, ...


4

Brewed coffee ages like milk. As soon as it is brewed its flavor begins to degrade and deteriorate, which is why it always tastes much better freshly brewed. While you may not necessarily taste the difference from one pot to the next, it has definitely changed your overall expectation of the flavor. The bouquet of coffee also is very complex, as is ...


4

So as far as I can tell, some kitchen towel can contain a variety of potentially nasty chemicals, including bleach. While it's only likely to be trace amounts, I'd avoid doing this except in an emergency. The best towel to use if you do is microwave safe kitchen towel, which has a minimal amount of stuff in it. As for the taste, I imagine it's going to ...


4

First things first, let's put the difference between French press and manual pour-over: French-press: Coffee and water stay in the same container during brewing. The water is not very close to boiling temperatures. You wait for a while to brew it. At the end, the output is coffee with some fine residue of coffee ground in it. This may continue to brew while ...


3

Caffeine content varies greatly by preparation and brew method. Instant coffee is generally designed to produce something close to a cup of drip coffee. "Cups" is unfortunately not well defined and may vary based on it's usage. Beyond that, percolated and french press coffee is generally prepared stronger (more concentrated) that regular drip coffee (and ...


3

I think you are going to have a hard time achieving what you are trying to do with the tools you are describing. Espresso is a very specific brewing method that produces a very specific type of coffee. Trying to mimic that flavor profile with other brew methods will generally fall short. Using more coffee for stronger flavor is one option, but it ends up ...


3

Science! What follows is my bogus hypothesis, with pictures (annotated in the conventional style) and annotations to bolster my unsubstantiated claims. Other (non-Chemex) cone-style (and basket-style) filters often have ridges down the inside of the cone. It seems that these ridges serve two purposes: to provide channels down which the coffee can flow, and ...


3

It seems everybody tends to see only the bad side of cafestol such as elevated cholesterol but no-one mentions it being a strong anti-carcinogenic. Health wise, I prefer the permanent one as cholesterol is something that can be controlled and monitored easily but sadly can't say the same about cancer. In regards of flavour, both paper and permanent have ...


3

Here is what I found: Trying to tear out a proper filter is difficult. Filters do resist to boiling-water temperature. Trying to tear out a proper filter along the seam is quite easy. So, by folding the filter on the seam, it seems we kind of hide the seam from direct contact with hot water. The seam glue is not weak these days, but this way there is no ...


3

I'll add in my cleaning routine for my Yama siphon. I use the standard Yama cloth filters, and my cleaning routine is (a) rinse thoroughly after each brew, (b) every 10 brews or so soak it in vodka or everclear to remove more of the accumulated oils and junk, and (c) do an oxyclean soak after 50 brews or so. Typically, around 100 brews the filter will ...


3

If you can remove the coffee grounds/filter and replace just those, then yes it will be safe from a health perspective. The plastic in the filter "cone" should be food safe, though durability may be an eventual concern. The plastic cup base can definitely be reused, as is intended. As far as the practicality concerns go, it may be more of a pain than it's ...


3

I would advise against using soap to clean anything coffee related. As a simple measure, just use boiling water to loosen the oils. You can also use citric acid (the recommended cleaner for coffee machines), you can find it online pretty cheap. Another option would be to soak it in baking soda to dissolve the oils. Whatever you use, just make sure you rinse ...


3

The only thing that I've found that I've found that works elegantly, quickly, and completely is ultrasonic cleaning. After boiling with vinegar water, lots of rubbing and scrubbing, high pressure steaming, and even ten minutes in a pressure cooker, it seemed to only get a bit more clogged. I set it in a small inexpensive ultrasonic cleaner I received as a ...


2

Well this idea was not entirely mine. Some of my senior colleagues gave me this idea a long ways back. When I make Cold Brew, what I do is: First simply let the coffee grounds steep in the water (no brainer here). Then, when it's brewed, I use a normal paper coffee filter. Then I use a very fine piece of silk cloth, thoroughly cleaned, as second filter (...


2

The discussion refers to hemp/muslin filters but the pros/cons do not include any experiences with these filters. Just a short note for reference: In terms of taste, hemp/muslin filters outperform paper and metal/gold filters. In terms of cleaning up, these are not the most practical, perhaps worse than mesh filters because they need to be rinsed after ...


2

If you want stronger coffee (referring specifically to the amount of total dissolved solids), then you really just need a stronger coffee to water ratio. Or just simply add more coffee. Although what I think you are really experiencing is a difference in mouth feel. Using a paper filter with certainly give the coffee clarity. Really fine paper filters (like ...


2

There's two points to address. "Weaker" coffee with paper filters as compared to brewing right in the cup. As far as I understand (although I can't find citation), paper filter does not capture caffeine or aromatic compounds very much. The feeling that filtered coffee is thinner may in your case come from less microgrounds floating in the cup (i.e., from ...


2

I also use a paper and mesh filter, but for a different reason. My drip machine has an attached grinder and came with a mesh filter. Paper filters leave a gap at the edge the generally results in ground going directly into the pot. I prefer paper filtered coffee, so I smash a paper filter outside the mesh filter and all my needs are met. I do however, ...


2

Doesn't every paper towel contains chemicals (bleach, perfume, etc), some more than others. The one's that don't use chemicals will leave a bad flavour. Coffee filters use special techniques to avoid that. That's why coffee filters are more expensive.


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