16

You have already listed most of the main points and hit them correctly, but I'll add some additional. Pros: You can get things not available commercially, and generally a much wider variety of coffee. For instance, almost all Sumatran coffee is traditionally dark roasted by companies. However, light roasted Sumatran coffee has a truly unique set of ...


10

There is a goodish guide for your roaster here. I'd also keep in mind that coffee has a cooling period after you "stop" roasting, where it will generally still roast to a darker level (or two). You need to try to finish your roast at a level or so lighter than what you are aiming for and let the coffee "cool" into your desired roast. I might suggest that ...


8

I have been roasting with the FreshRoast SR 500 for several months and have seen wildly differing advice from a variety of sources. Recently I found information from a few sources that when combined have resulted in some really nice roasts. The first piece of information I found was the temperatures for the heat settings of the FreshRoast SR 500: | ...


7

Yes, there is a way to store freshly roasted coffee - or even store bought roasted beans - at home under vacuum without expensive equipment. I drink wine and have collected a couple of wine storage devices over the years that I no longer use. One of these is a bottle stopper with a one-way valve in the top and a vacuum pump for removing the air from a ...


6

Rather than playing with electricity and wiring you could actually just move the roasting bed/area away from your heat source and accomplish close to the same thing. I started roasting with a popper as well. The hole in the popper was roughly 3 inches so I got a 3 to 4 inch duct adapter, a 4 inch flour sifter and mushed it all together, similar to this. ...


5

It does matter for a couple of reasons. Drawing out the roast generally produces more even results. Slower roasts mean that you have a better chance of stopping the roast at the target level and not over or under roasting. You can search the online forums for some of the home roasting sites, but many people run their roasters at a higher setting, then ...


5

I finally noticed that the chaff collection unit is actually several pieces that don't fit as well as they could. I took it apart and sealed the seams with high temperature engine gasket sealant. I then used the sealant to connect the vent hose to the top of the chaff collector (also a very rough fit). I still have some problems with cold air inflow on ...


4

I've been home roasting for about a year now and you've pretty much got it right. The bottom line is that home roasting allows much more control over the roasting variables. But home roasting takes time too, about an hour per pound for my SR500. It's not high volume by any means but I've found a system that allows me to get consistently really good coffee....


4

The easiest way to go is doing a full-immersion cold-brew. Grab a Mason Jar, Jar, beer bottle, anything. Grind your coffee (normally for french press) Put natural temperature (24°C) pure water. Let it steep at your kitchen or refrigerator (don't move it) for 12-24hrs Filter the grounds (metal, paper, sock filter, whatever) After you done that, start to ...


4

One method is to use submerge your grounded beans in water for 24 hours and use a traditional cone filter. Place the filter in a pour over cylinder if you have one and that will remove the grounds while leaving you the sweet, sweet cold brew nectar. If you don't have cylinder, you can definitely use a filter in your desired cup, just be careful with how ...


3

Terpenes are the lipids (oils) that give the main flavor to your cup. Therefore, you don't want to reduce them normally. However, if you really want to reduce them, best choice is, as stated thick filtered drip machines. (One can be seen in this post: Coffee in Breaking Bad ) Another brewing methodology that may be used is Turkish coffee. As coffee is ...


3

If you happen to own a French press, just put your ground coffee in there with water and either leave on the counter or place in the fridge. Next day, stir if you like, press and pour. No fancy equipment, no new equipment. Warning - it may not live up to the hype. I consider it fine, but not life-changing or "I'll never make hot coffee again."


3

Two more methods: Oven roasting. A simple sheet pan and and working oven is all you need. Campfire or Open flame roasters. Basically a metal box with a long handle. Expanding on hoc_age's response --> I prefer air poppers. They're simple and cheap. I have a modified Air Crazy I've used for 3-4 years and a more recently acquired unmodified Poppery 2. ...


3

The best would be buying a home roaster, but that would be expensive. corn popper does an amazing job considering how cheap and easy it is. (hair drying is like corn popper in principle, but will need you to manually make sure the heat is used evenly, corn popper just do it automatically) Using a pan need some practice but could be lot of fun to try. So ...


3

No. Unroasted coffee beans are denser and wetter than roasted beans and will not grind well. You will break your grinder trying, and even if the grinder succeeded, you'd get more of a mush than solid grinds. Also, roasting ground green coffee would allow much more of the oils and gasses trapped in the coffee to leak out during roasting than even the driest ...


2

I'm roasting with the Whirley-Pop so I doubt this will be too helpful to Chris, but I'll add my answer for the sake of completeness. The first time ever I roasted, I was waiting for a "second crack" that must have already happened, and before long my apartment looked like a scene from Backdraft. I learned my lesson and roasted outside on a hot plate, but ...


2

been roasting for at least 5months now,,and I'd say the reasons in roasting your own coffee is that you get to experiment which and what kind of roast that specific bean is, you'd be able to go deep and understand what coffee is,what the beans go through , and also for what i consider the best part besides smelling those aromas while beans are in that ...


2

I'm a little surprised that you need to reduce temps on a 1200watt device. I had the opposite issue but similar techniques might help you. I looked at the system as having 3 basic variables: temperature, airflow, and volume of beans. Alter any one and you can achieve a different result. In my case I was unable to achieve high enough temps with my Air Crazy; ...


2

I think it simply develops with experience. Bear in mind that typically those cupping notes are often written down as they carry out (hopefully) systematic cupping sessions. I wouldn't expect those distinct note descriptions to match up entirely unless you were going through the same cupping technique. Various brew methods will accentuate (dare I say alter) ...


2

A well sourced coffee that has been properly roasted and brewed can be amazingly sweet. It's not the same kind of sweetness of cane sugar, but maybe milk is a better example. Milk is not entirely sweet when cold, but as soon as you heat it to around 130F, it's turns deliciously sweet. In any event, you will want a lighter roasted coffee. I think it can be a ...


2

Actually it depends where you want to use your coffee. If you are using you coffee in an espresso machine, you may want to prefer a darker roast, maybe Vienna Roast. Just a bit darker than medium. This will keep acidity at lower values. If you are using French press, your cup will not be as acidic as in espresso. So, to taste the fruity flavors, it is ...


1

Don't think you can replace only the gears, but I found lots of places selling replacement lids with heavy duty gears. Check the link out below: WhirleyPopShop I googled 'metal gears for whirley pop' and got a ton of options. By the way, it appears that the gearing on the lid in the link above is held together by allen wrench tap screws so you 'might' be ...


1

The only reason for me is flavor. I was never that big a coffee fan until I got turned onto home roasting. I know it's not just vanity, because all the hardcore coffee drinkers I know go absolutely crazy for the stuff.


1

I too have an RK Drum used over an old Brinkmann All-In-One cooker with an 55 rpm electric motor attached. I wish I could get bean mass temp! And a trier... fantastic. But all I can do is put a thermoprobe just below the rotating drum and listen. I have a circular 1/8 inch steel plate sitting between the flame and drum so the probe is not exposed to direct ...


1

I'm not very familiar with the Kaldi roaster. From what little I've read, most buyers are pretty happy with it. I built a home roaster about a year ago using equipment from RK Drums, which requires a dedicated gas grill. I'm really happy with the results I get from this setup. I noticed the Kaldi also requires the purchase of a gas burner but what size and ...


1

This relationship is often discussed on coffee websites that I visit, such as such as http://www.home-barista.com and http://www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com. I have had a similar experience, although my roast times are much shorter than yours (typically 11-12 minutes total). I roast 3-4 coffees each week. Based on my own taste buds, coffees that are roasted ...


1

Your times are right where they should be. Can you control the airflow and/or temps while you are roasting in a Behmor? If so, try to increase the airflow near or after the first crack.


1

From healthline.com - Research has shown that drinking five cups of coffee daily from a French press brewing method can increase blood cholesterol levels by 6 to 8 percent. Five cups, every day, for an increase of 6 to 8 percent. That's a ton of unfiltered coffee. If you just have one decent-sized mug or so even every day, you should be fine, sounds ...


1

After plugging the roaster in I raise the timer to 9.9. If you do consecutive roasts it will hold this time as long as you do not unplug the roaster. I fill the roaster with the appropriate amount of beans (weighed out if possible). I roast on low until the beans are getting lighter green and starting to swell a little (usually 1-2 minutes). During the roast ...


1

This thing is not a workable solution to roast coffee all i end up with is Smokey tasting coffee beans. I was a packaging supervisor at a large coffee business packaging up to 15,000 pounds of coffee a day. I worked closely with the coffee roaster, and learned about coffee and roasting. a few years after leaving that business I made a bbq coffee roaster and ...


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