45

In a cool, dark, dry, place and whenever possible vacuum sealed. The oils in roasted coffee degrade as they are exposed to air (oxidization) as well as heat. As with just about any foodstuff moisture accelerates the spoiling process as well. You should store your coffee in completely sealed, insulated, opaque containers. If you have the ability, vacuum pump ...


16

First I want to draw a comparison between how much caffeine is in a coffee bean versus a cup of coffee, a cup of tea, or a double espresso. In a standard cup of coffee, there is approximately 150 mg of caffeine. In a cup of black tea, steeped for 3 - 5 minutes there is approximately 50 mg of caffeine. In a double espresso there is approximately 60 - 90 mg ...


15

I would add to not store it in the refrigerator or freezer. It would fare better at room temperature and dry than cold where it could be exposed to food smells and moisture. You didn't ask, but also drink it as soon as possible if it's ground. Whole beans will keep for awhile but ground coffee will start to go stale very quickly, even if stored properly. ...


10

Room temperature, open-air is fine (for a while) "Micro-roasted" implies that you purchased the beans where the roasting was performed on premises. That means it was probably roasted recently, within a couple of days. Roasts vary, but generally a bean will remain fresh for a week or two, open-air, room temperature from the time of roasting. One person might ...


8

I have been purchasing everything from cheap beans to rather pricey beans and what i discovered while buying the more pricey (and higher quality) beans was that the fragrance of the bean is somewhat stronger and can actually smell of more than just the usual grassy fragrance. Notes from fruits and nuts are not unusual and could be a indicator of somewhat ...


7

It doesn't actually matter! The valve on the bag is there to let gas out without letting gas in. The reason for this is that freshly roasted beans will continue to give off a bit of CO2 for a little while. Coffee that's packaged immediately after roasting will give off a bit in the bag, hence the need for a valve. Oxygen causes coffee to go off, which is ...


6

What you are likely seeing is the silverskin of the coffee cherry. Green coffee beans prior to roasting generally still have the silverskin intact/attached. As the bean expands during roasting and the silverskin dries out, it generally comes off. Part of the roasting process is some sort of agitation and airflow to remove this chaff. Depending on the ...


5

Adding some thinking out of the box to all the great answers, I would say: You should not store it, instead try buying less quantity, consistent with your rate of consumption, more often. In this way it's quality will be as near with its production quality. As an argument I will point out that oxidization is an effect that can not be prevented easily and ...


5

Do you know whether your beans are "washed" ("wet process")? There should be no problem with the white part. This is typical of washed coffee beans (vs. the "natural" beans that are, well, not washed, and the same part is then black). Also, when grinding beans, there is production of chaff that does affect the taste of the final drink. This should be the ...


4

This paper from the BC government states that 3 chocolate covered coffee beans have 36mg of caffeine. This study used doses of 0.3 mg per kg of body mass per hour, and noticed that the caffeine levels saturated exponentially. Information on the Effective Dose (ED) of caffeine, has been surprisingly hard to find. Although I did find papers that refer to ...


3

Trading off taste difference against price depends on how much each of them matters to you. Storing an open bag of beans in the cabinet for 8 weeks probably does matter to taste, while a 4% price difference is easily in the noise. Taste Difference It seems fair to assume you care about taste differences since you're asking. So for that side of the ...


3

Another option to quickly use coffee is cold-brew since it requires large amounts of coffee to produce a small amount of concentrate that lasts up to a week refrigerated. I personally use this method to "finish" an older roast so that I can start using a fresher one for my other brewing methods. Stumptown recommendation: 12 oz coffee + 56 oz H2O for 16 ...


3

One option is a somewhat obscure preparation method, but one that works best with older-ish beans: Nel drip (nel pot) preparation recommends beans that are a few weeks old; here's a Nel preparation guide from Blue Bottle. I don't know why older beans are recommended, except perhaps tradition. See also other questions tagged nel-drip including another ...


3

Ehow seems to have a step-by-step walkthrough for extracting coffee oil. Essentially, it seems you slow cook coffee beans in olive oil, then strain the oil through cheesecloth.


3

The big killers of coffee taste in roasted coffee beans are: moisture and airborne aromas oxygen heat In the roasting process the coffee bean doubles in size and gives off most of its moisture content. After roasting the coffee bean becomes super hygroscopic. (i.e. it wants to absorb all the moistures and airborne aromas in the atmosphere that surround it)....


2

It's interesting how negative folks can get about freezing coffee. There are a few places where freezing coffee has been tested to do really good things. 1) one good thing - is extending life (and flavour) of the roasted bean - when it's put down as soon after roasting as possible, and is only frozen/unfrozen once. here's a ref that goes into detail of a ...


2

In a cool, dry place, away from elements and preferably sealed / vacuum sealed No paper bags or canvas, something clean, and preferably with one of those moisture wicking buttons My favorite thing is a "Coffee Vault" from Mystic Monk. It has two seals and and has a 'lock' to the second seal. I use to work in a place where you could smell things easily, ...


2

You failed to give us any details about the variety, provenance or history of your green coffee beans. Nor did you elaborate on what kind of potential pests you are worried about so all we can do is speculate vaguely. The only likely pest to be found in green coffee beans is the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei. This is a tiny, 2mm black beetle. And ...


2

Perhaps a better way to frame your question is to ask if you are willing to pay an extra 4% to have coffee fresher by one month. For me that's an easy one - absolutely I would pay an extra 4% to have fresher coffee. There are all kinds of opinions about how long freshly roasted coffee maintains its freshness, but I've never seen anyone opine that roasted ...


1

Noah, sadly not a direct answer, but may i recommend that you reach out to your favourite supplier? Otherwise, you may wish to chat with the folks at Union Roasted or Squaremile who do a lot of work with specific farms, and may have related alternatives for you too. (robusta?? how unique) best -m.c.


1

Dry enough = 12% moisture content Weight loss by roasting = 12-18% of green bean weight Volume loss = opposite; coffee beans puff up after roasting


1

Are you sure it is water? If you bought a dark roast, there is a distinct possibility that there is a bit of oil in the coffee. Another possibility is a minor machine malfunction during the roasting process. With large scale coffee roasters, a small amount of water is sprayed directly into the drum just before dumping to "quench" the coffee and speed the ...


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