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13

By having a thin spout, you can more finely control the flow rate and where the water lands. When making pour-over coffee, you want to control the water level in the cone to control the brew time and evenly extract coffee. Also, water needs to be poured carefully onto the middle of the cone so that the water doesn't run down the side of the cone without ...


12

You're highlighting two differences between the two methods: temperature of the water, and rate of pouring the water (equivalently, how "full of water" is the cone). Short story: Use water just off the boil (about 96°C / 205°F). I prefer your "slower" pour method over your friend's... read on for why. Longer story: Keeping all other factors identical, ...


11

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. Lets use some of our 9,000+ full sensory reviews to examine the difference between Paper Filter Pour-over coffees and the Nel. TL;DR: Nel takes a ton of work to ...


11

The gases themselves are largely composed of CO2 and moisture trapped in the grinds. My understanding is that releasing the gases ahead of time prevent the gasses from interfering with an even extraction throughout the brewing process. As when brewing coffee, we're trying to expose the grounds evenly to the hot water, the release of gas fights against this, ...


10

Pour over systems give you the ability to control the water flow through the coffee grounds with a high level of precision whereas a drip brewer does not. I will admit, this is a bit of a trend, but there are very real differences in the taste of a pour over versus a drip brewed cup of coffee. Blooming -- Gets rid of trapped Co2. Easy to do in a pour ...


7

In general consistency is more important than a specific setting. The key is that you can actually control both the size of the grind and actually achieve a homogenous grind allowing you to increase the consistency in the coffee when you brew it as you can assertively control the service area being exposed during the brewing process. Since you stated that ...


7

Nate sums up the technical aspects nicely in his answer (+1!), so I'll just add a few other aspects. You also asked for the difference between the pour-over today and back then and where the difference to getting a cup from the big batch urn was. As far as the big urn goes, it is a question of timing. At the "single serve pour-over" coffee shop your cup ...


7

This problem seems quite normal. Over time, the little holes are filled up with small coffee grounds and stuck there by the help of glueing force of grease. This grease is extracted during brewing process. So, how could we get rid of these remains? Pretty easy. As they are organic compounds, you should dissolve them. As they include grease, dissolve the ...


6

In cooking in general weighting dry ingredients would be much more precise and give you greater control over your variables.


6

According to this site it's a by product of the roasting phase and occurs naturally hence the reason coffee bags have a degassing hole. When you grind the coffee the trapped gases are released and when the hot water hits it, this releases the gases quicker. Factors aside from storage that can affect this phenomenon are: Temperatures that the beans ...


6

There are a few elements to this answer, so I'll try to tackle them one by one. is it possible to brew another cup with the used grounds...? Yes. It is physically possible to do this. Just do what you described and voila, more liquid into the next mug. this would be the same as using more water and brewing over a carafe to brew twice as much coffee ...


5

From this site: Start with a grind size around that of coarse sugar. (Think Sugar in the Raw.) How much: Most pourover drippers work best when they're between one half to two-thirds full of coffee grounds. Any less than that, and there won't be enough coffee to restrict the flow. Any more, and your dripper may overflow. You'll also want ...


5

The short answer is yes you can stir pour overs and it can be useful but generally not recommended. The primary use for stirring pour overs that I have seen is a very light stir to jostle grounds that have stuck to the brewing methods walls. The slight stir at the maximum volume of water in the filter makes sure that as fluid drains grounds stay in the ...


5

The bloom should be 30s for V60 and 40-45s for Chemex and Kalita and 30s for full immersion methods (like AeroPress or French Press). Blooming is not just about degassing but also to saturate the grounds (which obviously goes hand in hand) and to start dissolving solid compounds (mainly acids and caffeine, sugars come later). If you'd want to change, just ...


5

Yes, it'll be fine. Drip brewing and pour-over coffee are essentially the same process: Pour hot water over ground coffee to extract flavor compounds, then let the infused hot water solution drip through a filter into a serving vessel. As far as the final product is concerned, it doesn't especially matter if this happens in a machine that dispenses the ...


4

In general, the coarseness of fine sand. It will be difficult to effectively communicate grind size here, and what is recommended is to go to your local coffee shop, have them grind a sample of coffee for you on their drip grind, and then have you take that home and calibrating your grinder to a similar size, adjusting for taste.


4

I hope this isn't a trade secret or anything, but at Starbucks we recently got new measuring pitchers for pour-overs that have a long narrow snake-like spout. It allows you to more or less just pour straight down the center. The narrow "bore" so-to-speak gives a precisely controlled rate of pour. Confusingly, all the documentation still refers to a bloom. ...


4

You need to use a coarser grind. You have grounds that are just the right size to block the mesh. Too small and they'll just pass through, making your coffee gritty. Medium-sized and they'll block the mesh. Large (coarse) enough, and coffee can flow around them. Not too large: you won't be able to extract enough from the beans with this brewing method ...


4

First things first, let's put the difference between French press and manual pour-over: French-press: Coffee and water stay in the same container during brewing. The water is not very close to boiling temperatures. You wait for a while to brew it. At the end, the output is coffee with some fine residue of coffee ground in it. This may continue to brew while ...


4

This could depend on the brand of filters and the brewing method so it's worthwhile (and fun) to do the experiment. I'd love to see results from more experimenters. Bamboo vs. Paper Filters: I did this experiment. We only had three tasters but the results were statistically significant at the 5% standard -- all three of us could taste the difference. The ...


4

I highly recommend anyone looking at a pour over to take a look at the Clever Dripper. It's a pour over brewer with a plate at the bottom that restricts flow unless the unit is resting on a cup. You can use it as a regular pour over or you can use it off a cup to steep your coffee. It allows all the control of a press and the grounds free cup of a paper ...


4

It should work since there is no magic involved in the pour over coffee maker. The only problem could be the pressure from the wet coffee on the 'arm' holding the coffee since it was never made to keep the coffee in midair. It wouldn't be expensive to get only the coffee dripper ( I got a plastic one for 2 euro, fancier porcelain once come for 10 euro as ...


3

It sounds like the main thing you're not carefully controlling for is temperature. I have found that if I use cooler temperatures (80-92 degrees celsius) for my pour-over, I get very bright/acidic tones. Hotter water (92-100 degrees celsius) always gives me more bitterness and earthy flavors. I use an electric kettle with a thermometer to maintain the ...


3

Several "automatic pour-over" machines have recently come onto the market from manufacturers such as those you listed. They are something of a hybrid between the ubiquitous, conventional "automatic drip" machines and manual pour-over methods. That is, the automatic pour-over machines attempt to perform the same sequence of steps recommended for manual pour-...


3

I'm not sure what the citation standards for this site or if a "hey this worked for me, why don't you try it applies" so please downvote accordingly and point me to the correct meta articles. But, what I've done, ever since I started making pour over coffee after watching Alton Brown extol it's virtues on Good Eats, is to use a tea pot with the lid closed ...


3

Science! What follows is my bogus hypothesis, with pictures (annotated in the conventional style) and annotations to bolster my unsubstantiated claims. Other (non-Chemex) cone-style (and basket-style) filters often have ridges down the inside of the cone. It seems that these ridges serve two purposes: to provide channels down which the coffee can flow, and ...


3

As per Kyle above, YEs coffees fresher to roasting are expelling more gas than older ones that have degassed more. indeed a definition of staleness may include no more CO2 is released. hitting beans with water shows that this gas is happening. But why bloom? that is supposed to get the gas out so water can come in. Does it? if so for how much of what's ...


3

I would advise against using soap to clean anything coffee related. As a simple measure, just use boiling water to loosen the oils. You can also use citric acid (the recommended cleaner for coffee machines), you can find it online pretty cheap. Another option would be to soak it in baking soda to dissolve the oils. Whatever you use, just make sure you rinse ...


3

The only thing that I've found that I've found that works elegantly, quickly, and completely is ultrasonic cleaning. After boiling with vinegar water, lots of rubbing and scrubbing, high pressure steaming, and even ten minutes in a pressure cooker, it seemed to only get a bit more clogged. I set it in a small inexpensive ultrasonic cleaner I received as a ...


2

Bottom Line: When someone allows their coffee to bloom, they are pouring just enough hot water on the ground coffee to allow the gasses to be released but not so much that a lot of water starts dripping through. The presence of CO2 is indicative that the ground coffee is fresh. However, we do not actually want CO2 in the coffee we drink. Therefore, it is ...


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