11

The gases themselves are largely composed of CO2 and moisture trapped in the grinds. My understanding is that releasing the gases ahead of time prevent the gasses from interfering with an even extraction throughout the brewing process. As when brewing coffee, we're trying to expose the grounds evenly to the hot water, the release of gas fights against this, ...


6

According to this site it's a by product of the roasting phase and occurs naturally hence the reason coffee bags have a degassing hole. When you grind the coffee the trapped gases are released and when the hot water hits it, this releases the gases quicker. Factors aside from storage that can affect this phenomenon are: Temperatures that the beans ...


5

The bloom should be 30s for V60 and 40-45s for Chemex and Kalita and 30s for full immersion methods (like AeroPress or French Press). Blooming is not just about degassing but also to saturate the grounds (which obviously goes hand in hand) and to start dissolving solid compounds (mainly acids and caffeine, sugars come later). If you'd want to change, just ...


5

I believe there is mysticism to blooming. Don't get me wrong, I feel its important, but I don't think it does all the things that people claim it does. Blooming is important when using fresh roasted beans(and you should be). Blooming simply aids in removing CO2 from the grounds, which would otherwise create negative space between your grounds and the water. ...


4

Blooming is the outgassing of CO2 (carbon dioxide) from the ground coffee in response to hot water being added. The more recently the coffee has been roasted, the more bloom you can expect. It doesn't make a huge difference ultimately if this is done quickly or slowly when you brew your coffee. What I have noticed myself is that it's sometimes diffcult to ...


4

I hope this isn't a trade secret or anything, but at Starbucks we recently got new measuring pitchers for pour-overs that have a long narrow snake-like spout. It allows you to more or less just pour straight down the center. The narrow "bore" so-to-speak gives a precisely controlled rate of pour. Confusingly, all the documentation still refers to a bloom. ...


3

A good reason to use a small amount of water when blooming a pourover is to avoid channeling. Water flowing through coffee will follow the path of least resistance, so when you have gaps being formed by CO2 bubbles, some water is going to quickly and disproportionately rush through those low density areas. Degassing as much as possible with a minimal amount ...


3

As per Kyle above, YEs coffees fresher to roasting are expelling more gas than older ones that have degassed more. indeed a definition of staleness may include no more CO2 is released. hitting beans with water shows that this gas is happening. But why bloom? that is supposed to get the gas out so water can come in. Does it? if so for how much of what's ...


2

Bottom Line: When someone allows their coffee to bloom, they are pouring just enough hot water on the ground coffee to allow the gasses to be released but not so much that a lot of water starts dripping through. The presence of CO2 is indicative that the ground coffee is fresh. However, we do not actually want CO2 in the coffee we drink. Therefore, it is ...


1

You would bloom a large percolator the same way you would bloom in a pour over. Of course, there are different ideas about how to bloom for pour over. From the website Hand Ground: Use a 1:1 coffee-to-water ratio for the bloom "Bloom the heck out of the coffee" with a 2:1 ratio Stir the bloom DON’T stir the bloom To bloom coffee in your ...


1

It's going to produce a stronger brew and probably more oils, likely resulting in more crema. What you're essentially doing is heating the grinds, starting the extraction process a bit and then giving a small amount of hot water about 30 seconds to cool before adding more - very similar to what pre-infusing a puck in an espresso machine would accomplish. ...


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