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As per Kyle above, YEs coffees fresher to roasting are expelling more gas than older ones that have degassed more. indeed a definition of staleness may include no more CO2 is released. hitting beans with water shows that this gas is happening. But why bloom? that is supposed to get the gas out so water can come in. Does it? if so for how much of what's ...


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Bottom Line: When someone allows their coffee to bloom, they are pouring just enough hot water on the ground coffee to allow the gasses to be released but not so much that a lot of water starts dripping through. The presence of CO2 is indicative that the ground coffee is fresh. However, we do not actually want CO2 in the coffee we drink. Therefore, it is ...


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There are two important factors here: temperature and control. Temperature Temperature is probably the most important factor here. You don't want the temperature to be too low, when that's the case you won't be able to extract all that you want. You can easily ensure you're not using water that's too cold, either by pouring straight from the kettle (goose-...


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My goodness - all sorts of new gadgets to get intrigued about - and now - you have a reason to buy BOTH sizes of acaia scales! a pearl for the base and a lunar for the pot! for me this double weighing is to check saturation of water by beans - seems like this device could make this process reuqire fewer steps. For instance - i like to make sure i'm ...


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As noted in the replies above, the receive wisdom is pretty much don't stir just - wet - bloom - pour more etc. however, in terms of the science of coffee or its chemistry, you'll find that stirring is very much a Good Thing - by making sure you have in that wetting phase 3 times the water to bean ratio lets say, by a vigerous stir, what are you doing? you'...


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