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The given ratio is maybe a bit unusual - many sources for pour-over irrespective of the exact brand (Chemex, Hario,...) give 1:17 or 60g per liter of water, which is 16.666. This seems to be the ballpark number for pour-over. But is the Kalita different? Your source calculates between 1:13.9 to 1:15.6. Interestingly, at least one source (in German, sorry) ...


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Pourover methods tend to use a paper filter which prevents oils from flowing into the coffee. Pourover is also brewed at a low pressure and a higher coffee to water ratio, giving the coffee a gentler, tealike taste. Moka pots are closer to espresso in terms of intensity and pressure, and does have more body and a richer flavour. I personally prefer pourover ...


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There are two important factors here: temperature and control. Temperature Temperature is probably the most important factor here. You don't want the temperature to be too low, when that's the case you won't be able to extract all that you want. You can easily ensure you're not using water that's too cold, either by pouring straight from the kettle (goose-...


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I'm a big coffee drinker and after many different brands and roasts tried, I'm very sure coffee taste notes on the bag or website are literally just marketing and not descriptive of the coffee at all. It's a dark roasted blend of Ethiopian, Sumatran, and Peruvian beans. It's probably going to taste like a tame (less bitter) but strong black. Don't expect ...


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