15

tl;dr: Permanent filters win on cost over time. Paper filters win on performance, clean-up, and health. Flavour is personal preference. Composting paper filters and spent grounds alleviates most of the environmental benefit of permanent filter. My conclusion: paper filters, discarded into a compost pile, win hands down. Use of permanent versus one-time-use ...


11

Lets answer this question with some data! My company uses machine learning, data science, and sensory science to build flavor profiling and quality control tools for the craft beverage industry. Lets use some of our 9,000+ full sensory reviews to examine the difference between Paper Filter Pour-over coffees and the Nel. TL;DR: Nel takes a ton of work to ...


10

There are many difference between the two filters. In this website. it states that: Today, most white paper filters are whitened with oxygen. Oxygen whitening is much more friendly to the environment, and imparts no taste to the filter. Brown filters are simply unwhitened. Your choice, but oxygen whitened filters are usually less expensive. Brown filters ...


7

Short version: The Hario brand filters are thinner than other paper filters and seem to have more texture than other types of filters. I assume this has some, but perhaps slight, impact on the rate at which water passes through the filter and also what "stuff" passes through the filter, which impacts the resulting brew and its taste. Longer version: The ...


5

There are "basket-shaped" filters, which I think is what you're looking for. In my area, they're just as common as "Melitta-style" cone-shaped filters; you should be able to find them at most markets / grocery-stores. They come in various sizes; you're probably looking for one of the smaller ("junior size") variety. From this previous answer, here's a ...


5

Do you have maker with a removable filter basket? (Like the photo I attached below.) If so, then you might try what I've done: removing the basket placing the filter then running water through it The support of the basket protects against failures. And while you won't be able to rinse the reverse side easily, you will be able to get enough water into it to ...


4

I love good strong coffee. To lose flavor is a deal breaker. I tried the gold mesh filter and it is un-acceptable to me. I went back to paper. I was told that because of the screen mesh bottom the permanent filter (like the one I had) has, the hot water doesn't stay with the coffee long enough. It passes right through. Whereas the paper holds it longer, ...


4

I would agree with you. With the thin flat layer of coffee the hot water is just pushing a hole right through it. You are not getting nearly the contact time of a full size brew. If it was conical or V shaped filter then it would better accommodate different size batches. On that pot it does not look like you could just simply use a different filter ...


4

Brewed coffee ages like milk. As soon as it is brewed its flavor begins to degrade and deteriorate, which is why it always tastes much better freshly brewed. While you may not necessarily taste the difference from one pot to the next, it has definitely changed your overall expectation of the flavor. The bouquet of coffee also is very complex, as is ...


4

First things first, let's put the difference between French press and manual pour-over: French-press: Coffee and water stay in the same container during brewing. The water is not very close to boiling temperatures. You wait for a while to brew it. At the end, the output is coffee with some fine residue of coffee ground in it. This may continue to brew while ...


4

This could depend on the brand of filters and the brewing method so it's worthwhile (and fun) to do the experiment. I'd love to see results from more experimenters. Bamboo vs. Paper Filters: I did this experiment. We only had three tasters but the results were statistically significant at the 5% standard -- all three of us could taste the difference. The ...


3

Yes, because it allows more time for coffee to be extracted as it stored in a longer time for coffee to drip. However, other parameters also have effect regarding this issue (such as, type of bean, roasting profile, temperature, brewing method) But using double filter since it also filter the "flavor", making it stale (you may lose the pleasant acidic, ...


3

Science! What follows is my bogus hypothesis, with pictures (annotated in the conventional style) and annotations to bolster my unsubstantiated claims. Other (non-Chemex) cone-style (and basket-style) filters often have ridges down the inside of the cone. It seems that these ridges serve two purposes: to provide channels down which the coffee can flow, and ...


3

It seems everybody tends to see only the bad side of cafestol such as elevated cholesterol but no-one mentions it being a strong anti-carcinogenic. Health wise, I prefer the permanent one as cholesterol is something that can be controlled and monitored easily but sadly can't say the same about cancer. In regards of flavour, both paper and permanent have ...


3

I learned in a chemistry lab that a paper filter does not "work" i.e. "filter" if it is not wet. If you put a paper filter in the cone and wet it before putting the coffee in the filter works better as a filter. Do this little test - make coffee with a dry filter and shake out the grounds. You will notice the filter is discoloured and had absorbed some ...


3

Let's answer your first question first: What's the best way to rinse a paper filter? Inside, outside, both? Soak? Hot or cold water? You can't really rinse only the outside/inside of a paper filter. When you drop water on a piece of paper, it doesn't just stick onto the outside/inside, it soaks both sides of the paper filter. So, both sides. You probably ...


2

One thing that the flavor profile doesn't cover is "mouth feel". According to one Nel aficionado, Nel Coffee has a consistency or mouth feel that's different from traditional pour over. Nel Coffee is said to feel thicker in the mouth, like a fine wine can have a thicker feel than a cheap wine. If so, the flavor profile may not indicate this distinction. ...


2

If you want stronger coffee (referring specifically to the amount of total dissolved solids), then you really just need a stronger coffee to water ratio. Or just simply add more coffee. Although what I think you are really experiencing is a difference in mouth feel. Using a paper filter with certainly give the coffee clarity. Really fine paper filters (like ...


2

There's two points to address. "Weaker" coffee with paper filters as compared to brewing right in the cup. As far as I understand (although I can't find citation), paper filter does not capture caffeine or aromatic compounds very much. The feeling that filtered coffee is thinner may in your case come from less microgrounds floating in the cup (i.e., from ...


2

The discussion refers to hemp/muslin filters but the pros/cons do not include any experiences with these filters. Just a short note for reference: In terms of taste, hemp/muslin filters outperform paper and metal/gold filters. In terms of cleaning up, these are not the most practical, perhaps worse than mesh filters because they need to be rinsed after ...


2

I also use a paper and mesh filter, but for a different reason. My drip machine has an attached grinder and came with a mesh filter. Paper filters leave a gap at the edge the generally results in ground going directly into the pot. I prefer paper filtered coffee, so I smash a paper filter outside the mesh filter and all my needs are met. I do however, ...


2

My choice is the Melitta “All natural bamboo filter”. Manufacturer claims “made with 40% bamboo” and “recycled paperboard” and “100% compostable filter paper”. I grind my beans using the Turkish setting for a super fine grind and use a hand poured one cup filter system which gives me a really super full rich taste. Michael Gamble


2

It's relatively difficult to define quality differences without knowing how you're grinding it. Grinding may be the most influential aspect in your case. If you're grinding with just a basic blade grinder, your grounds are extremely inconsistent. Regardless of your brewing method, your result will be quite different from the results of a grinder with better ...


1

Of course Option B. Water is fully recyclable. So rinsing vs composting is more friendly. GOHAWKS


1

According to the official website for the Chemex products, the filters available for the Chemex are: CHEMEX BONDED FILTERS PRE-FOLDED CIRCLES (FC-100) CHEMEX BONDED FILTERS PRE-FOLDED SQUARES (FS-100) CHEMEX BONDED FILTERS PRE-FOLDED SQUARES (NATURAL) (FSU-100) CHEMEX BONDED FILTERS UNFOLDED HALF MOON (FP-2) The 10 cups Chemexes, are: - TEN CUP GLASS ...


1

Hi not likely to be a trait of kirkland beans or of packaging of the beans. Static electricity can build up between the grinder and the beans. - you'll note that the beans will also stick to the sides of whatever receptical they get ground into. Here's one hack to fix this at the grinder stage it used tiny amounts of moisture that likely reduce what's ...


1

From experience, the french press can produce a better flavoured / bolder cup of coffee in my opinion; however paper filters produce a more consistent flavour/body (better quality). For me, quality is consistency in results. So by definition, paper filters produce better quality coffee. Depending on the type of bean you use, the output coffee from a french ...


1

Honestly, I think you simply just need to coarsen your grind. Also, make sure you align the thick part of the filter (that has more layers) with the spout on the chemex. This just allows air to pass through which helps the percolation.


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