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16

Oh, the famous latte! Apparently hardly anyone knows that it simply means "milk" in Italian, so technically calling a coffee drink "latte" is pure nonsense. So where does the coffee shop staple get his name from? In Italy, a latte macchiato ("stained milk") is basically an espresso in a glass of hot (steamed) milk, pouring the espresso last leads to the ...


14

There's a chart for that! Here's a link to it, but I've also included an image below. There could be some argument over cappuccino vs. latte as to which is "creamier" as the cappuccino certainly has more mil foam, but the latte has much more milk by volume and by ratio. On the whole though I'd say the latte is a less strong drink with a creamier texture ...


12

It may be just me, but I think it has to do with aiming for a ratio of foam to liquid in each sip. Basically a taller cylindrical cup with the same amount of foam on it would cause the first couple of sips to be mostly, if not entirely, foam. With a shorter wider cup you can have a lot of foam, but in a thinner layer, allowing for a more balanced sip and ...


11

I own this machine and have since moved on from it for the exact reasons you stated. It is possible to create microfoam that is good enough for making clearly defined latte art on the Delonghi Dedica but it requires practice (as would doing the same on any machine). You did the right thing by removing the metal sleeve but the main problem is that the steam ...


8

I'd give oat milk a try. I had an oat milk latte on the weekend and it was surprisingly good. The milk texture was the closest to normal milk I've had. I did not steam the milk myself (had it at Talkhouse Coffee in London), but judging by the latte art, oat milk would definitely appear superior to soy and almond milk (microfoam-wise). Oat milk is also high ...


8

Here's another take, but going in the direction more of performance for foam (i.e., more for cappuccino than latte), mostly because I found links about that :) and because steamed milk should foam. If you're not looking for much foam, the differences are probably less profound. There's a few other plant-based milks out there also; coconut and rice weren't ...


8

I prefer lattes in big wide cups as it allows me to enjoy it with a multitude of senses. The process of consuming starts by absorbing the warmth of the cup into my hands. This tells me if the latte is too hot to consume. The process also conjures up memories of the Japanese green tea ceremony where two hands are used to drink. It makes me feel connected to ...


7

Hard to diagnose just on the back of a photo, but if I had to guess, I'd say the milk is not "sunk" properly (i.e. the consistency of your espresso is different to that of the milk). This would also explain why the base of the rosetta is a bit "murky". That took me a while to figure out, but I had the same issue (check this out, then compare to this). So in ...


7

In my experience, it is difficult to achieve perfect microfoam with a home brewing espresso machine. Essentially what you need is a 15 bar pump and a boiler chamber big enough to hold enough steam to have higher pressure and volumes of steam. Unfortunately, this usually means you need to buy a bigger espresso machine which means it is going to be a bit ...


6

Just for fun, I will name 3 alternates: Almond, Soy, and Hemp. Almond Not that good as a milk substitute on taste (better alone), yet a great way to make healthier coffee. As for the health benefits, almond milk has good proteins, calcium and Vitamin D, low sugar as long it is unsweetened. It is rather hard to make latte art or steam as well for a perfect ...


6

You need a high-protein plant milk in order to obtain proper froth as the froth is kept in shape by what are essentially entangled protein molecules. According to google, rice milk only has ~10% of cow milk's protein, which explains why it doesn't work well. Soy milk has pretty much the same percentage of protein as cow milk, so that is worth a try. Coconut ...


6

Assuming you are not planning to buy a lot more machinery, you can simply use the Nespresso to make espresso - depending on your preferred strength, two to three shots should be what you need for your 20 oz mug. A Starbucks “Venti” is named for the twenty oz volume and contains three shots. But that's basically a puddle in your mug: You need to fill the ...


5

It varies by shop and order. For instance, order a latte at Starbucks, you have a selection of sizes, and then variance in the number of shots (or espresso) you order in the drink. Since the sizes are not doubled (12, 16, 20 ounces, not 12, 24, 36) and half shots are not a thing, the ratio will vary at the order level.


5

Tried oatmilk yesterday at home as a milk substitute in my lattés and it was delicious. I used an organic brand with zero other things in it and it frothed up almost identically to normal milk (i use the nespresso latte frother). I used it with decaf and it tasted great - i actually prefered it to milk and my usual latte (the milk slime that coats the glass ...


5

I've steamed milk on my friend's Saeco Aroma, which seems to be in the same class as your Delonghi, and was able to get good microfoam. Aside from getting some pointers along the way, the key is practice. It took me years to master consistently steamed milk worthy of latte art. You'll probably get something decent if you keep working at it, but then you'll ...


4

I'm not familiar with Costa, but I am with Starbucks. Let me offer my ideas in what's different. Starbucks stores use fully automatic espresso machines with semi automatic frothing wands. The espresso machines make true espresso, unlike all of the brewing options you mentioned. This is the main reason the coffee is better. The frothing wand also uses steam ...


4

In addition to what have been said by @Stanimiroff, it could be added that, in general, fine cream with, no bubbles*, can be achieved if the steam is used to twirl the milk initially and distribute heat equally in the pitcher without holding it on the surface too long. The bubbles are formed either in the beginning, if you keep the steam on the surface for ...


3

Cafe Latte comes in many variants, all of which are Cafe Lattes. If you ever see anyone ordering a "Cafe Latte with nonfat milk" at Starbucks, this typically refers to a Cafe Latte with milk that has less than 0.5% of fat. Note that 0.0% fat milk is not available everywhere. For example, it is common in central Europe that the lowest percentage of fat ...


3

All of your stated options can work well and @PythonMaster covered the pros and cons pretty well. You stated that latte art and steaming well were important and I didn't see you mention wanting healthy options. In that case I would not recommend almond. It will work ok, but not as good as soy. Hemp is comparable to soy based on your needs but might be ...


3

From what I have found the only rule to make latte macchiato is to use at least 200ml of milk for a 30ml espresso shot. Clearly this is mostly defined by the volume of the glass the coffee is served in and that will definitely vary from shop to shop. I would expect the coffee shops to use standart espresso shots but no one can be sure about this either.


2

Lactose free milk is milk. I'm lactose intolerant and I know it won't cause you problems if you are just lactose intolerant. Some people are determined to avoid dairy, but if that's not your goal, go lactose free. You can get it in all the normal fat percentages from skim to whole. I forget which fat percent is recommended for frothing but it exists.


2

I'd say that it is still a Latte. Given that a Latte has espresso, steamed milk and foam components, a 0% skim milk latte will have all of those components. Indeed, some of the most resilient foams are made with low fat milk, as the protein structure is not interfered with by the fat. You tend to get very smooth and densely structured foams. I know ...


2

If the milk is cow fresh... You will have to put it through a process called homogenization. It is normally done when the milk is pasteurized for us who are chained to grocery carts. Homogenization is where the fat of the milk becomes emulsified and it keeps the cream from separating out. The following article contains a description of the process: https://...


2

"I still can't get a fine enough foam to produce latte art." If you are not satisfied with your milk foam because of the small bubbles on the surface, then try to "bump" the pitcher (knock the table with the pitcher). It will remove the bubbles and it will make foam more uniform. "My espresso and its crema do not seem dark enough to produce the contrast in ...


2

The only thing you haven’t tried according to your list is genuine espresso with steamed milk. The standard coffee chain menu is based on espresso shots and steamed milk, in various ratios, and perhaps some flavor syrups. The coffees types you mentioned are all “thinner”, i.e. with a higher water-to-coffee ratio (the nespresso is probably closest to a true ...


2

Your premise is incorrect -- they aren't actually very good at all. You just haven't had anything better to compare them with, and besides, this is a subjective opinion. The reason they are better than the coffee you're making at home, and more expensive, is primarily their investment in tools and training. They're using a much better coffee machine and ...


1

I have had this exact same machine for about 1 month and am realizing that it is just much more difficult (so far impossible for me) to get art-quality micro-foam out of it for two reasons: 1- Steam is not consistently strong enough, and 2- The wand (after you remove the panarello) is too short However, it makes tasty espresso, tasty foam (albeit not art ...


1

Is it a wand with a single tip at the end? To get microfoam, you only have to produce a little foam at the start of steaming, a few light 'rips' of bubbles, then the rest of the time is spent whirling this into the milk. Keep the wand tip just below the milk and a little to the side while keeping the pitcher flat. This will create a whirlpool that helps mix ...


1

From the video, I agree with the comment that you haven't made enough foam. This is probably mostly due to the small vessel you have. The proper steaming pitcher should hold about twice as much milk and foam as you'll actually use. This gives you the space to spin the milk and create lots of microfoam. After you have an appropriate pitcher, follow these ...


1

Check this out https://youtu.be/X00xSAndJZU I also find that the milk will be separated with the foam quite fast so you need to immediately pour the milk out of the can. Shaking the can also help a lot as the milk will again emerge with foam and give silky result.


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