6

I would follow the same guidelines as cow milk when using any alternative milk. For one you really just can't taste a liquid that is scalding hot, so you might as well not go so toasty. Other than that - If you think it tastes great, then keep doing that. If it smells less sweet, it probably is less sweet - you just gotta find that perfect sensory sweet spot....


6

You need a high-protein plant milk in order to obtain proper froth as the froth is kept in shape by what are essentially entangled protein molecules. According to google, rice milk only has ~10% of cow milk's protein, which explains why it doesn't work well. Soy milk has pretty much the same percentage of protein as cow milk, so that is worth a try. Coconut ...


6

The short answer is yes. The absence of the milk fats means that the foam will not "coagulate" as easily. The proteins chains in milk are polar: one end of the chain is hydrophilic (attracted to water), and the other is hydrophobic (repelled by water). Because milk is mostly made up of water, as soon as those proteins unfold, exposing their ends, ...


5

Melange describes different beverages with coffee in different places. The Melange from Vienna is indeed very similar to Cappuccino. However, Melange is sometimes not produced using Espresso, but normal filter coffee. In Switzerland, in contrast, Melange is made with whipped cream instead of milk.


4

You're on the right track for good foam by keeping the tip of the wand close to the surface. To end up with less foam, submerge the tip as the temperature rises and the hiss drops to a whisper; I usually dip down after the first 15 or 20 seconds or so for a latte, longer for a cappuccino. When you hear milk "screaming" in coffee places, that's the sound of ...


4

From experience it seems slightly easier and is less runny. The difference for me is pretty negligible with semi-skimmed vs. whole milk. Skimmed on the other hand always ends up quite watery for me, but that may have something to do with the way I'm frothing it.


3

It certainly won't compare to a steam wand, but yes you can totally get okay milk texture using one. In all honesty though, I've had better success using a french press. Heat milk via stove stop, put your milk into a clean french press, and push and pull the plunge repeatedly until your milk froths. It's not perfect - but good enough to pour some latte art.


2

Actually, the silky wet milk foam may be a problem if you cannot easily reach a steam wand. However, froth is quite easy. All you need to do is fill the milk texture with small air bubbles. A nice tool to do this could be your French press. After preparing your coffee in a French-press, swiftly clean it and fill it with some milk. Pump the filter in and out ...


2

It's just a matter of tradition, style and skill. Traditionally the thick, hard foam with bigger bubbles is used in Italy for Cappuccini. Same goes for espresso macchiato. Sometimes the milk foam is spooned on top of the espresso. In other countries they often imitated italian style coffee, which is why e.g. in Germany the foam is usually very thick as well. ...


2

Another difference is that the Aerocinno tends to produce firmer and longer-lasting froth compared to a wand. It's designed to provide a one-size-fits-all solution for consumers accustomed to automatic machines, whereas a milk wand requires more skill to use but allows for a lot more customization. Think of it like an automatic vs manual transmission. Note ...


2

Any idea why the foam is not creamy anymore? And I get a froth instead? Could this be due to mixing it on a higher/quicker level? Yes, absolutely. Rudimentary speaking the process of whipping something is adhering air bubbles to the fats in your mix (similar to soap bubbles, where the fats act as the soap). The finer these air bubbles are, the finer and ...


2

The short answer here is that that device is not up to the job. Consider how microfoam is typically achieved in coffee shops compared to this device. Espresso shops use steam for a reason. Steam is a very effective mechanism for injecting both steam and air into milk while simultaneously agitating the milk. Your device, on the other hand, heats the milk from ...


1

Based on the following comment: No Im asking whenever I serve Lattes or capps the froth usually rises to the top and leaves water and espresso under the froth. Im told that this is wrong and Im frothing the milk wrong I surmise that you're using a steam pipe and you're frothing the entire drink with the espresso already in the cup. The problem you're ...


1

Check this out https://youtu.be/X00xSAndJZU I also find that the milk will be separated with the foam quite fast so you need to immediately pour the milk out of the can. Shaking the can also help a lot as the milk will again emerge with foam and give silky result.


1

As Mayo mentioned above, it is not clear if you meant frothy espresso (with crema) or cappuccino/latte? In the first case. The chepeast and most effective way to make smth like espresso with rich crema is a Bialetti Brikka (not any other moka pot). Brikka has a special crema (pressure) valve that help get full body taste and nice crema foam on top. Here you ...


1

Ok - not having used one of these tabletop frothers, I don't really know how hot they actually get. But I suspect that the difference is down to the steam wand heating the milk more than your frother. The science behind it (vastly simplified is): Foam This comes down to how adept you are with a steam wand - initially you don't fully submerge the wand, ...


1

There is in fact a difference which can’t always be seen: A Viennese melange is espresso mixed with hot milk, topped of with milk foam. A Cappuccino is merely espresso topped with (a lot) of milk foam.


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