13

Roasting coffee dark may be used because it is easier to create a consistently flavored bean, with less monitoring and concern for flavor profiles. In the case of Starbucks they are shipping so much of their coffee to so many locations and creating so much coffee at once that it may be easier to create consistency. The darker you roast the less the flavor of ...


11

Here's an opportunity to start refining your brewing process. Coffee brewers, including myself, tend to use weight as our measuring unit as opposed to volume since bean sizes vary significantly already without accounting for origin or roast level. All of these factors will change the real amount of coffee you believe you have once ground and also change the ...


9

Though I don't generally like to cite Wikipedia as my primary reference, it does in this case have a pretty good overview of terms related to coffee extraction, re-summarized here: Extraction: The amount of the original mass of the grounds that ends up in the brewed coffee. Though it certainly depends on the preparation method ("method of extraction", e.g., ...


9

Coming from Germany myself I have seen this rating only on a single brand of coffee. There is no standard for this (even though us Germans seem to like standardizations), but basically strength of the coffee is about the inherent bitterness and caffeine content you get out of it. The stonger a coffee the more caffeine and also the more bitterness you will ...


6

I see only one possibility to make your turkish brew stronger and that is using more coffee beans per serving. You are using boiling water and long extraction time so almost everything from the coffee gets extracted leaving you this only option to make it stronger.


5

There are a number of concrete factors that will impact the stimulation you get from a cup of coffee, but it probably boils down to the amount of caffeine (and any other stimulants) that are in your cup that get extracted from the beans. Here's a few factors that affect the caffeine content of coffee, with links to other related questions on this site: ...


4

It varies by shop and order. For instance, order a latte at Starbucks, you have a selection of sizes, and then variance in the number of shots (or espresso) you order in the drink. Since the sizes are not doubled (12, 16, 20 ounces, not 12, 24, 36) and half shots are not a thing, the ratio will vary at the order level.


4

That site that you linked (from www.buismaningredients.com, and this one) suggest that the main ingredient is caramelised sugar. The claim is simple enough: "caramelised sugars enrich the taste of coffee" (from cited articles). Caramelisation is the thermal decomposition of sugar (sucrose); not precisely "burnt" as such but similar. I can't find any ...


4

There are a few things you can do. 1) More beans. More beans = more surface area = more extraction. 2) Grind finer. It's tough to control grind size with a blade grinder, so if you really want a consistent, strong cup, you will eventually want to invest in a burr grinder. But with a blade grinder, grind it longer. 3) This is the biggest: don't use ...


4

It's marketing jargon. In this case, it likely refers to the darkness of the roast, as there is often confusion about difference between darkness of the roast and the strength of a cup of coffee. In truth, coffee has no "strength" until it is brewed. And then, strength is determined by how many solubles you have dissolved into the water. If you want ...


3

When people talk about strength they often confuse different things like the flavor intensity, caffeine concentration, roast grade, how full bodied a coffee tastes or how much bitterness it contains. If someone orders a coffee at a corner bakery and asks for a "strong coffee" they probably mean a high ground coffee to water ratio and a lot of dissolved ...


3

Yes, because it allows more time for coffee to be extracted as it stored in a longer time for coffee to drip. However, other parameters also have effect regarding this issue (such as, type of bean, roasting profile, temperature, brewing method) But using double filter since it also filter the "flavor", making it stale (you may lose the pleasant acidic, ...


3

In addition to what have been said: easier to maintain consistency as quality is lower. longer preservation. It could be added: it gives more intensive taste (possibly local market demand and standards). allows greater dilution. possibly smaller dose in the shot extraction.


3

There are two sides to the answer. First, there is the sugar aspect. In moderation, sugar is a critical part of our diet. If you are combining it with two doughnuts and two further teaspoons of sugar in the coffee (for example) then it could potentially lead to the same insulin cycle that causes weight gain in people who eat too much sugar. The rapid intake ...


2

Tip 1: Measure the volume after grinding (again) so the change in packing density of grinding won't be a factor. At a medium grind as suitable for a drip coffee maker (Baratza #20), I find the pre/post grind ratio is close to 1:1. At a finer grind as suitable for an AeroPress (Baratza #14), the ground coffee is significantly less dense. A finer grind makes ...


2

Could it be possible that your previous ground coffee was finer than how you grind your coffee now? Try a finer grind with your usual measurement, and see if you can improve the strength.


2

Based on my own experience, ground coffee or coffee beans are more or less have the same volume per gram. The author also shares the same experience with me on his blog here with some experiment and a nice photo. I assume, the difference in strength may be a result of different bean quality. The flavor of coffee beans depend on many factors that you can ...


2

From what I have found the only rule to make latte macchiato is to use at least 200ml of milk for a 30ml espresso shot. Clearly this is mostly defined by the volume of the glass the coffee is served in and that will definitely vary from shop to shop. I would expect the coffee shops to use standart espresso shots but no one can be sure about this either.


2

The Starbucks-owned brand "Seattle's Best Coffee" uses numbers on its bagged supermarket coffees, too. I equate it to the stars you can use to order Asian takeout with more or less spiciness. There's no set scale I've ever found, but it's a general way to tell the consumer where on the spectrum each product (roughly) lies.


1

A good rule of thumb is to follow a 1:15 ratio of coffee to water. So for every 1 gram of coffee, add 15 grams of water, which coverts to about 3 tablespoon of coffee for every 1 cup of water.


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