14

There's a chart for that! Here's a link to it, but I've also included an image below. There could be some argument over cappuccino vs. latte as to which is "creamier" as the cappuccino certainly has more mil foam, but the latte has much more milk by volume and by ratio. On the whole though I'd say the latte is a less strong drink with a creamier texture ...


6

You probably just hit upon a place that simply didn't know what a cappuccino was, or lacked the facilities to prepare one. French coffee culture is a little different from Italian, but usually a cappuccino is much like what you'd expect. I found this exhaustive guide to French coffee culture, and it notes: Capuccino – A French cappuccino is thirty per ...


5

This sounds Cortado or Noisette to me. Still, additional water makes it a bit interesting. I assume you may simply order your coffee based on lungo instead of doppio. Again, lungo based Cappucino Scuro may be another alternative. However, it also has foam on top of steamed milk. This answer includes so much terminology. So, let me make a glossary. ...


5

It's made from 3 equal parts Milk foam (top) Steamed milk (middle) Espresso (bottom) as illustrated (bottom left) on this image designed by Lokesh Dhakar... There is also some details here, however it does not describe the important split in foam and steamed milk. For a 3-ounce macchiato, use a 2:1 ratio of espresso to milk; for a 6-ounce cappuccino, ...


4

I have lived in the west of Belgium for a few years. I can say, they are strongly affected by the French culture. However, I am not thoroughly aware of daily French Cappuccino routines, I would like to add my observations from Belgium. Belgians usually have both options. You can either order your Cappuccino with steamed milk or with whipped cream. If you ...


4

My take on this is to focus on the mechanics and preparation, which I think is an important part (though perhaps not all) of a cappuccino being properly made. Fundamentally, a cappuccino consists of espresso and steamed milk (see distinction from a latte). The World Barista Championship specifies the proper construction in their beverage definitions (.PDF) ...


3

It was in Vienna, by a Capuchin Monk who is a friend of the owner of the first coffee shop of the city. Please see this previous answer.


2

I think we can assume it's as safe as drinking eggnog. (eggnog a drink made from raw eggs, milk, spices and sometimes alcohol) I think the "level of safety" depends on which country you take the egg from. In some countries, eating an egg raw is safe, but in other countries it's not (like in Canada and United-States) Basically, I GUESS you wouldn't get sick ...


1

Many of these fully automatic machines heat the milk by combining steam and milk. In my experience, those machines do not take into account the temperature of the milk, they simply mix steam and milk at a fixed ratio. Assuming the steam has a fairly constant temperature, the temperature of the heated milk will mostly depend on the temperature of the cold ...


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