Hot answers tagged

13

Baking soda. I use a standard dish sponge/scrubbie with baking soda and a little water and it comes completely out. I've actually tried it with just a damp paper towel and baking soda and it's almost as easy. Baking soda has natural whitening properties and is a very gentle abrasive. I actually started using it elsewhere (sinks, counter tops, greasy pans) ...


12

It may be just me, but I think it has to do with aiming for a ratio of foam to liquid in each sip. Basically a taller cylindrical cup with the same amount of foam on it would cause the first couple of sips to be mostly, if not entirely, foam. With a shorter wider cup you can have a lot of foam, but in a thinner layer, allowing for a more balanced sip and ...


11

Both cup material and temperature are in play here, I think. A big part of the coffee taste (and experience as a whole) is the aroma. I personally find that paper cups (not surprisingly) smell and taste like paper. Ceramic (or glass, porcelain, etc.) should be practically neutral. Any smell you get from the cup could affect the perception of taste of the ...


8

Keep in mind that paper cups are manufactured. I have been in industrial plants my whole career. There are odors, vapors and minute particles in the air that get packaged with the product. They are not harmful per say but are released into the hot beverage on contact and could likely impart a flavor.


8

I prefer lattes in big wide cups as it allows me to enjoy it with a multitude of senses. The process of consuming starts by absorbing the warmth of the cup into my hands. This tells me if the latte is too hot to consume. The process also conjures up memories of the Japanese green tea ceremony where two hands are used to drink. It makes me feel connected to ...


7

The origin of not washing your coffee cup stems from the age when coffee cups were made of metal. An example can be still be seen with the Italian practice of seasoning a moka pot. When a metal coffee container (moka pot or coffee cup) is new/washed, the coffee takes on a metallic flavor. Once the container has been used once or twice, the oils from the ...


7

It may be superstition but many people, myself included, don't wash out their coffee cups. I rinse out my cup but don't wash it - I don't want soap going into my favorite coffee cup. I like the way it smells of coffee. I don't have to see or touch my favorite coffee or tea cup to know which one is which. In addition I never use soap on either my coffee or ...


5

According to my "Lavazza Barista Guide" the shape of the cup affects the foam of the espresso and indirectly affects the taste. It is explained as; the foam helps to protect the valuable ingredients to not to be evaporated easily. Also, the foam keeps you espresso warm while you are not drinking it. In the guide, it is stated that the thickness and the ...


5

Another possibility for residual stains: Try soaking in powdered dishwasher detergent (i.e., stuff for automatic dish machines, not dish soap) and boiling water. The process: put a small amount (~ 1 tsp / 5 mL) of powdered dishwasher detergent in the cup. Fill cup with boiling water (very hot tap water might also be okay). Stir to dissolve detergent. Let ...


3

The reason is that your coffee grounds are too fine. Your Percolator needs coarser grains for various reasons: Allowing water trough it more easily – else the pressure needs to go too high and your coffee will taste burned as it is roasted a second time from the overheated filter basket [1]. Not allowing small small grounds to "whirl" up in the water and ...


3

All the tips above are good and might help, but in my opinion a good coffee cup shouldn't get any stains what so ever, in case it does I suggest you to throw it away and buy a new one. Why not using a regular espresso glass cup similar to: These cups will never get stains :)


3

The bubbles are the result of "degassing" — carbon dioxide escaping from the coffee. Degassing will be especially dramatic in the first 24 hours after roasting, during which 40% of the CO2 leaves the bean. See this blog post: Understanding Degassing.


3

Puro Caff This stuff cleans stains from all my presses, thermoses, and cups...makes all like new again.


2

Could be a way of "marking" your mug by way of the stain suggesting that the mug is in use. This only works for coffee mugs that are tied to a desk. Consider that in a restaurant, mess or chow hall, mugs filled with coffee are washed and folks who drink their coffee from stained mugs will drink coffee from clean ones. I know I do. At work, I drink from a ...


2

I don't know that company, but I assume insulated paper cup is what you are looking for. You may have a quick Internet search for brands and whole sellers.


2

Since @MTSan already gave an excellent answer, I thought I would throw a twist into the discussion. While you asked whether or not the shape of the drinking vessel would impact the coffee's flavor, this leaves out an important aspect of the cup you're drinking from: it's color! While there are a few different sources out there, here's one research paper on ...


2

You can always pour through a paper filter (after brewing by whatever means) if you want to avoid any grounds in the cup.


2

Assuming that the cup is made from ceramic or glass there will not be any problem in cleaning and reusing it. There may be an issue with how things react with metal over time but I sincerely doubt it.


1

Turns out, it's not heat which is the enemy of good coffee, but too much heat. The best coffee warmer is one that keeps your coffee at a controlled drinking temperature. The problem with a thermos is that it will keep the coffee too hot for comfortable drinking initially. Reheating will burn the coffee. So anything which keeps the coffee at around 50°C will ...


1

Heat is the enemy of coffee. I brew my coffee in a French press and then transfer it into a carafe, the carafe keeps it from cooling down. I only pour out 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup at a time. No unnecessary use of electricity.


1

It is common for a shop to offer only one size of flat white because a flat is a very basic drink. It's a shot of espresso with foam added. That's all. If you further dilute a flat white by adding milk, you have a latte. If you multiply a flat white by using two or more shots of espresso, you end up with two or more flat whites. If you run a shop and the ...


1

Ceramic is more porous than glass, so a ceramic mug insulates better than regular glass and thus keep the coffee hotter, but double-walled glass insulates even better than ceramic. A porous mug might exchange molecules from one cup to the next. (Is there experimental data on that?)


1

Don't worry, you've taken your first step to solving the problem. :) If you find grounds in your cup, and you grind your own beans, simply grind your beans a few clicks coarser on your next brew. But if you've already purchased a bag of ground beans, then try to have them ground a few clicks coarser next time. :) You'll get your clean cup real soon!


1

I nice clean cup or mug certainly adds to coffee drinking enjoyment in my opinion. Since coffee stains are somewhat oil based, I suggest you put in a dollop of coconut oil, sprinkle in some baking soda, salt, and a few drops of water, scrub with a toothbrush or nail brush. Follow with some vinegar, then a hot water rinse. Since your cup is warm it is a ...


1

Use some thick household bleach with the option of adding a bit of warm water. Leave this to stand in the cup making sure the stains are coated with bleach. After leaving these for several hours the stain will eventually be removed! Works on the toughest stains. Remember: wash this out thoroughly under a tap before using it!


1

We at Delpac manufacture paper coffee cups. The inside of the paper is PE polyethylene coated (not wax). There should not be a taste per se from this material but there is a different "experience" from using a ceramic cup or mug.


1

Patina, may be dangerous if the cup is made of copper. Patina is a formation of oxidation, and the greenish copper oxide is poisonous, please get rid of copper cups or make them plated with tin as in traditional Turkish cezves. (See this related answer.) Another perspective may be the smeared oil and its contribution to the overall flavor (or at least the ...


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