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A moka pot is what some call a stovetop espresso maker; I find this to be a bit of a misnomer, because the result is rather different than proper espresso. Water is put into a bottom vessel; coffee grounds are placed on a perforated platform with attached cone, which is placed on/in the water vessel; a top holding tank with rubber gasket is screwed on top of ...


6

First things first, you should decide if it's better than any other brewing method, or not. Decide your cup by tasting and experimenting. (By the way, it's unclear what you mean by "regular brewer" in your question. According to my experience, there's no regular way of brewing coffee.) I'm not a fan of percolators. However, l can add a few objective things ...


5

If you like it better, it is better. If not, it's not. But evidently, it is for your friend. While I don't use one at present (nor own one at present) I've stayed at a place where a percolator similar to the image was the only option for coffee, and it was fine. I've also had percolated industrial-scale (30 to 50 cup percolators) coffee that rates quite ...


5

Espresso tastes different than percolator coffee, but not necessarily better. Espresso extraction produces a more concentrated drink with a different set of compounds that you would get with percolator extraction. With a shorter extraction time and higher pressure, espresso will have a slightly different set of compounds than you would get from the same ...


4

Brewing is a part of every coffee preparation method: it's the time when the water (or steam) is in contact with the grounds. It is a generic term. Percolation however, would only be used when making percolator coffee. You would not talk about percolation time when making espresso, for example. I would not use it as a generic term.


3

Actually, this answer will eventually boil down to the forecasting of time dependent expected coffee consumption function of your guests. You may expect that, right after a meal or right after they are seated people tend to drink coffee all together at once. Therefore, it is better to keep most (all?) of the pots filled up when you encounter them at first. ...


3

I am a big fan of ignoring volumetric measures and using weight instead. Especially for a huge pot like this one, any old kitchen scale should be precise enough to allow a good dosage (for just a cup or two, you need more precision). The general recommendation for filter coffee is 60g coffee per 1000g water (And remember that 1000g =1kg = 1l.) As for ...


3

First, let's clear the misconception. The posted photo in the question is a moka pot. This is a common misconception all around the globe and also discussed in Coffee SE a few times. Please see the following post to clear this out: Does a percolator make "better" coffee? A better answer, also including the differences in between an espresso and a ...


2

In essence it's pressure, temperature and how coffee is generally ground for the method that make the difference. Espresso forces water at high pressure (generally about 250PSI) and a specific temperature (generally between 92 and 94 degrees Celcius) through ground coffee. Percolator coffee relies on gravity to move water that's generally boiling (100 ...


2

These two things are clearly not the same. Here are my reasons: Moka pots - They use small amounts of pressurized water flowing through the coffee grind to make a fine stovetop espresso. The brewing process is relatively cheap and nearly uses the same amount of pressure as a actual espresso machine. You could even call them just mini espresso machines if ...


2

In the world of coffee, the two terms are basically interchangeable - as long as you are talking about water passing through coffee, and that it is also being passed through some sort of filtration. Percolation by definition is the extraction of a substance by passing water through it. Your brew time would be the time that your water is in contact with your ...


2

I've been getting the idea that percolated coffee has a strong retro component to it. I remember my family had one of these as I grew up: Pretty darn cool looking, isn't it? But it is highly subjective whether or not a percolator produces a good cup of coffee or not. But what is really cool, is that for a reasonable amount of money, you can purchase a ...


2

In a stove top coffee maker the water is boiled in the lower chamber, the steam pushes the water at low pressure upwards through the grounds before reaching the upper chamber, let's call it decanter. So the water is in contact with the grounds only once. Due to the high temperature there is arguably over extraction happening. In terms of flavor you can tell ...


1

You would bloom a large percolator the same way you would bloom in a pour over. Of course, there are different ideas about how to bloom for pour over. From the website Hand Ground: Use a 1:1 coffee-to-water ratio for the bloom "Bloom the heck out of the coffee" with a 2:1 ratio Stir the bloom DON’T stir the bloom To bloom coffee in your ...


1

I think its wrong. Each method for coffee have speciality details. Absolutely grind size for espresso machine is different with mocha pot. You can use the same grind size with different ratio. Ant this way make different body and different strength


1

In an academic article (in English language and authored by two Italian authors) espresso preparation is divided into these three steps: Grinding of the roasted coffee Coffee powder dosing and tamping Brewing (more correctly Percolation) In the rest of the document, percolation is preferred. According to this, Eric's first hypothesis in his question about ...


1

To me a percolator is a just a mechanism. You have a heater at the bottom, a tube, and a check value. The water enters the tube and some of the water is vaporized and it pushes the hot water to the top. They have no pump. That style of coffee maker is called a percolator. From there the term got used a lot ways.


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