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18

Tamping is one of three key controls you have over the espresso brewing process; The others are dose (the amount of coffee used) and grind coarseness. Together, they allow the coffee machine operator to produce a puck of the correct density and consistency through which the pressurized water can be pushed through. While techniques vary, the "rule of thumb" ...


15

Let's start off with what the function of the tamp is. Function The tamp is cylindrical in shape and is ideally just snug enough to fit into the portafilter smoothly. What the tamp does, is prime the coffee bed to be met with water. What we know about the water is that in general, in commercial machines, water is applied with 9 bars of pressure. Physics ...


9

Each new bean becomes a bit of an experiment with each new machine you use. A rule of thumb is to grind just enough to fill the portafilter so the beveled edge of the tamper becomes flush with the edge of the portafilter using about 15kg of pressure. A crude diagram: |||||| < Tamper | [||||||||] | < Tamper 'head' flush with portafilter edge (...


6

When i started brewing espresso some years ago i started out with placing a robust scale on the counter and applying pressure while reading the weight in order to measure how hard i tamped my coffee. By doing this i was also able to experiment with the weight in order to determine the actual significance of the pressure applied to the puck.


5

Espresso machines rely on pressure to extract coffee solutes over a very short (~25 seconds) extraction time. Tamping is a critical aspect to achieving this. By tamping ideally, you eliminate channels by which water might pass through the grounds. Elimination of those channels is important for two reasons. First, channels mean that water only touches some of ...


5

There are a pantload of recommendations on tamping, but the one recommendation common to all is... practice! And... The most optimal way of tamping depends on every individual pull: the beans (freshness and grind), your skill, machine, etc. at that moment. Ultimately, the goal (and most important part, in my belief) is to pack the grounds uniformly. Any non-...


4

If you only use a double (14g) portafilter basket then you're best to use a 58mm convex tamper. This is because if you look at the basket, in most cases, the sides will slope in. Therefore, if you had a flat 58mm tamper then the you are compressing to outer more than the inner. Obviously the whole point of tamping is to compress the grounds consistently ...


4

Based on your comment on the question, you are referring to compacting ground coffee in the portafilter. This process is referred to as tamping when making espresso. The widely-accepted amount of downward force to use when tamping a standard double shot of espresso is 30 lbs. You can view a source here but if you simply do a google search for "espresso ...


2

If the espresso is pouring too fast it most likely means you need to grind finer, not tamp harder. To avoid channels you first need to make sure your machine's pressure is not too high. 9 bars is the usual pressure, but there is evidence that 7 bars will reduce channeling. Many consumer machines come with 12-15 bars of pressure which is simply too high. ...


2

In general, by the majority of baristas, the recommended method to tamp is this: safely hold the basket (with the portafilter) fill and tamp the grounds using appropriate force (5–20 kgf) make a circular movement (180–360°) with the tamper to smooth the surface Regarding your question, any kind of shock may be harmful for your gadgets in the long run.


2

My rule of thumb is to tamp after inserting the basket into the portafilter for one main reason; after the tamp, I want the coffee puck to remain as undisturbed as possible before pulling the shot. If you have already inserted the basket in the portafilter then dose and tamp, the only required action after tamping is inserting it into the machine's group ...


2

I am unaware if this specific machine has specific requirements. If this is the case, please mention. I mostly prefer to tamp the coffee after I put it in the portafilter. It's harder to carry the basket with coffee in it. Also it's harder to tamp the basket without easily holding it in place.


2

The best way to control of shot extraction without adding excessively complicated electronics (if by PID you mean proportional-integral-derivative controller) is: How fine is the bean grounding (the finer the grounding, the higher the density -> the slower the extraction). Applied pressure on the grounded beans in the machine group head (the higher the ...


1

An espresso machine sends the water through the coffe grounds under high pressure, typically 9 bars. If you had an uncompacted bed of grounds, the water would just bore through on a path of least resistance (aka. channeling), leading to a very uneven extraction. A moka pot, on the other hand, only uses steam pressure to force water up through the coffee ...


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