I recently had coffee in India and it was quite thick. The way they made it they took instant coffee+sugar+little bit of water. They then beat this mixture into a thick paste. Then they added hot water and it turned out really delicious.

I really liked it; however, I'm wondering if it's possible to make this without using instant coffee? I'm not a big fan of instant coffee and have specific coffee beans I'm really a big fan of. I'm a coffee nooob so any advice on making a similarly thick coffee recipe?

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    Erm, “instant coffee + sugar + water + more water” sounds like, well, sweetened instant coffee? Could you explain how thick it is or roughly what ratios they used? – Stephie Aug 12 at 9:10
  • @stephie The recipes generally use condensed milk at some point. That's why they end up thick. – MT San Aug 14 at 23:02
  • Sorry @Jack, is this a typo? I think it should be like this: "I recently had coffee in India and it was quite thick. The way they made it they took instant coffee+sugar+little bit of water. They then beat this mixture into a thick paste. Then they added condensed warm milk and it turned out really delicious." – MT San Aug 14 at 23:05
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    This type of coffee is quite frequently prepared in our house. The reason for the paste is that instant coffee powder is used, along with large grain sugar. I'm not sure how you'll get powder from a pre-brewed liquid. What you can try, however, is using milk powder to obtain that consistency. – A_B Aug 23 at 7:55

Just like you described it. Add water a little by little, then took a spoon and swirl it. Then repeat, maintaining a thick paste, it will start to have a creamy colour. The most important thing is DON'T ADD TOO MUCH WATER until the paste is ready (you will know when), then it's ready to fill your cup with water and drink it (it will have a lot of cream, basically created by swirling and aeration).

Just try it and then repeat next time if it doesn't go as you want to.

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    Can this be done with regular coffee instead of instant? – Stephie Aug 15 at 4:14
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    Nope. "Regular coffee" will never dissolve into water :( – Omar Miranda Aug 16 at 22:36
  • I meant „regular“ in the sense of „already prepared, brewed“. Sorry for the confusion. – Stephie Aug 17 at 4:35

A Cuban friend of mine had a similar process with a mocha pot where he'd make the mocha the usual way, take a small amount of the coffee and use that to make a paste with some sugar he had previously put into a cup.

Once the paste was made he'd add the rest of the coffee and stir it in. I've never tried it myself as I've never been a fan of sugary coffee (except café de olla, google it, you'll thank me), but from the sound of it it might give similar results.

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    yes pretty good explanation on how to make italian coffee “crema” with moka, just make sure you use the very first part of the brew, no more than a few spoons (depending on the moka size) and work it with sugar as much as you can – Edoardo Aug 23 at 16:32
  • I thought crema was an espresso brewed with coarser grinds and run for longer? – Devyzr Aug 24 at 21:53
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    crema in italian is a generic term for foam, in coffee term is the suspended emulsion that gets created during a good espresso brew. any other preparation tries to recreate the same effect in other ways, there is this method that uses sugar with moka and used to be popular in italian houses before espresso became so widely available – Edoardo Aug 28 at 13:16
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    here is a video that shows how to do it, all though the outcome is not perfect (he had to work the sugar more) m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFM-gYcYHmE – Edoardo Aug 28 at 13:37
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    Ahh, ok. I read about the first part but not the second part about recreating it. Thank you! – Devyzr Aug 28 at 16:32

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