PJNoes
  • Member for 6 years, 10 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
Why can’t I find natural beans easily?
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2 votes

Coffee producers tailor their production to worldwide demand for coffee. Wet processing of coffee produces large quantities of green coffee bean for the lowest production cost. The process is more ...

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Does it make sense to buy smaller-sized bags of whole bean coffee to keep it fresher?
2 votes

Perhaps a better way to frame your question is to ask if you are willing to pay an extra 4% to have coffee fresher by one month. For me that's an easy one - absolutely I would pay an extra 4% to have ...

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How should I store whole bean coffee?
15 votes

I would add to not store it in the refrigerator or freezer. It would fare better at room temperature and dry than cold where it could be exposed to food smells and moisture. You didn't ask, but also ...

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How do I get started in roasting my own beans at home?
1 votes

Don't waste your time with any kind of stove top roasting, not only because you can't control the process well enough to get consistent results, but also because the smell and smoke will be too ...

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How to judge time between cracks when roasting
1 votes

I am a home roaster and I've ruined my fair share of coffee beans learning just how to use my own roaster. I use a hot air roaster, the Fresh Roast SR500 and I've done many hours of internet research ...

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Is there any way to preserve roasted coffee beans?
2 votes

In a previous similar question I posted this picture of a method I've been using for a couple of months now. I place my freshly roasted beans into an empty wine bottle and then vacuum pump it for ...

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Is there a way to economically store freshly roasted coffee under vacuum?
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7 votes

Yes, there is a way to store freshly roasted coffee - or even store bought roasted beans - at home under vacuum without expensive equipment. I drink wine and have collected a couple of wine storage ...

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How can I emphasize the sweet, fruity notes of my coffee?
1 votes

Since you are already using an AeroPress, I would look for ways to get the flavor you want with the tools you already have. First, make sure your water isn't too hot. I've seen recommendations for ...

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What are the reasons to roast coffee yourself?
4 votes

I've been home roasting for about a year now and you've pretty much got it right. The bottom line is that home roasting allows much more control over the roasting variables. But home roasting takes ...

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Difference between inverted and normal aeropress?
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4 votes

The differences are minor, but there are differences. When brewing normally, water begins to drip through the paper filter immediately when poured over the grounds. After stirring I usually have to ...

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Would 2 small V60 brews (1 cup each) be less bitter than 1x large (2 cup) brew?
1 votes

The bitter compounds in coffee are less soluble in water than the other flavor compounds we like, so we can use that to keep the bitterness to a minimum. In brewing; water temperature, length of ...

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What factors should I change for a dark roast in an Aeropress?
0 votes

The good news and bad news about an Aeropress is the number of factors you have total control over during the brew cycle. Here is a partial list off the top of my head: 1. Quantity of beans; 2. ...

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Roasting my coffee beans
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5 votes

Your first question isn't clear exactly. All drinkable coffee has been roasted first, as raw coffee beans are not edible. I've read that re-roasting beans isn't practical for some reason that I'm not ...

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When accounting for bloom, why is the common instruction to stir with very little water?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Blooming is the outgassing of CO2 (carbon dioxide) from the ground coffee in response to hot water being added. The more recently the coffee has been roasted, the more bloom you can expect. It doesn'...

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How long should I steep an AeroPress (inverted)?
4 votes

Actually the answer will be completely dependent on the coffee you're using, how finely it's ground, and how dark it's roasted. I read on a roaster's site (I'll try to find the reference) that acidic ...

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How to follow Aeropress instructions when water filters through too quickly
3 votes

The best solution is to turn the Aeropress upside down with the plunger already inserted into the barrel when you brew. This way, nothing drips out until you flip the whole thing over and start to ...

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Is it possible to burn coffee while brewing?
3 votes

Yes, coffee can be burned when brewing. When an empty pot sits on the heating element in a restaurant coffee machine it can get very hot. When the first stream of a new brew cycle hits the bottom of ...

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Does my coffee pot need to be fixed?
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7 votes

If you could be more specific with your question it would be easier to answer. For example was your previous "pot" a percolator or automatic coffee maker or what? By the same token, what is your ...

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How to prepare good coffee during an outdoor trip?
2 votes

I answered a previous question about making coffee with eggs that might also address your question. The method is very simple and I see no reason why you couldn't do the same thing without the eggs. ...

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Why would anyone want to hand grind their coffee?
5 votes

Your question has the statement that your blade grinder results in grounds that are equal or superior to the hand grinder in terms of texture. This is generally not true. There was a time when I ...

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What is the background of brewing coffee with eggs?
4 votes

I don't know any history behind the practice but I learned it myself during a rafting trip down the Grand Canyon back in the early '90's. The method was to put a couple of fistfuls of loose grounds ...

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