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10

Starbucks' dark roasts are very dark. It tastes like ash because it contains ash. There's no way around that. That said, you can minimize the ashy notes in your brew by using the below suggestions: Lower the brew temperature--cold brew in particular works well for this purpose Use a coarser grind setting when grinding If using a hot brew method, reduce ...


4

I use a French press. I never really got on with them before - the coffee always tasted burnt. Then I found out about not using very hot water and scalding the grounds. I now put some warm tapwater in the pot first, put the coffee in, and stir it a bit until the grounds are mixed in and not just floating on the top. If you're only making for yourself, you ...


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Your thoughts are neither new nor unheard of. Coffee as a product has always been a luxury item in most parts of the world, so consumers have been creative in finding substitutes for the real deal from the start. They were and still are prepared both at home and sold as commercial products. There are also coffee-and-substitutes mixes, stretching the yield of ...


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I'm trying to narrow my focus for learning purposes so I can really develop a sense of how the process works regarding one specific kind of bean. That's a good way to start to learn the basics of your roaster, but keep in mind that other roasters will roast the bean differently, especially a tumble or hot air "popcorn" roaster. You'll learn more ...


1

Oily surfaces are related to roast level I don't think oily beans are related to roasting time as you say in your question. Instead, oily beans are characteristic of a darker roast. Roasting levels are primarily related to the internal temperature of the beans, the higher the internal temperature of the bean, the darker the roast. Wikipedia has an overview ...


1

Former world barista champion James Hoffman actually looked at this question in his YouTube video entitled How To Brew Better Dark Roasts. A summary of tips regarding dark roasts used for non-espresso brewing methods: Freshness is more important because the beans are more porous. He recommends using the beans within 2-3 weeks of roasting. Use a paper ...


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Any Central American SHB is a good start. These beans provide familiar flavor profiles so you can better judge your own roasting skills, and they're pretty tolerant of a wide range of roast levels. Try hard beans from Guatemala, Colombia, etc., then just wing it branching out from there.


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Toss them in the bin Two years is a heck of a long time for coffee. 6 Years is just beyond good and evil. If you're really really lucky the coffee is going to taste of wood, cardboard and ash. If you're unlucky, you'll get some funky and moldy notes. Also re-roasting coffee does absolutely no good to the coffee whatsoever, if anything, you'll end up burning ...


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Honestly, I would discard them. The flavor is developed by roasting, but once it’s gone, it’s gone. We are talking about volatile aromatic compounds, that likely have degraded or evaporated (yes, it may even happen in mostly airtight containers). Re-roasting may create some more, but assuming that the original roast was “as intended”, you would likely create ...


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