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16

It is possible to grow coffee indoors. If allowed to grow as a tree they can reach 8 feet tall but if trimmed occasionally you can get the plant to grow more like a bush around 3-4 feet. This will change some based on the exact type. Coffee plants prefer shade with a couple hours of direct sunlight in the morning. Keeping it by a window should be about ...


11

Adding coffee grounds to a planting medium (e.g. soil) adds fatty acids, essential oils and nutrients that enrich soil which can help the growth of the plant and it may also affect the colour. One thing to be careful of is that some coffee grounds increase the acidity of the soil. However, I can't find anything indicating that it will affect the flavour of ...


6

I found this website which prescribes the following subtropic and equatorial growing conditions. The subtropical regions, at high altitudes of 16-24° (Illy, 21). Rainy and dry seasons must be well defined, and altitude must be between 1800-3600 feet. These conditions result in one coffee growing season and one maturation season, usually in the ...


6

Although the way plants digest food is very different to humans, the overall principle is the same: nutrients go in, and are completely broken down into very basic building blocks (amino acids, simple fats and sugars), and then rebuilt into whatever the organism needs. This is why we can eat plants, which are made of plant protein, and reassemble them into ...


6

Brazil is unique in that it is the largest producer of coffee, but it is also unique in that it produces a huge volume of dry processed coffee. Dry processing is not unheard of, but is much rarer in other countries. Dry processing produces a coffee that IS different than most other processing methods. The coffee tends to roast differently and also produces ...


5

Actually, Brazilian Coffee is not so unique. According to the book on coffee that I have (from 2014), Brazil is the leading producing country for coffee in terms of volume - it produces 35% of the coffee sold worldwide. The have many different areas of production, which produce a variety of beans (80% Arabica, 20% Robusta), using a variety of different bean ...


5

There are not any firm guidelines established for what constitutes a specialty coffee. Theoretically no one would consider anything made by Folgers to be a specialty coffee, and anything produced by a small local roaster should probably be considered specialty, but there is a lot of gray area in between. For instance, some people may consider the bagged ...


5

Based on the study entitled Effects of Altitude, Shade, Yield and Fertilization on Coffee Quality (Coffea arabica L. var. Caturra) produced in Agroforestry Systems of the Northern Central Zones of Nicaragua the summary describes following on the altitude subject: ... Altitude had the strongest influence on coffee physical characteristics, ...


4

In addition to the factors mentioned above, it has been shown that the growth and yields of coffee plants depends on shading levels. This is also important regarding the biodiversity and pest rate present in the area. Generally, the more biodiversity and different kinds of shade trees, there will be less harmful pests and better chances of surviving extreme ...


3

They get sold for less money as "standard export" grade coffee. Because of NFC's marketing campaign, ANY sort of Colombian coffee ends up with higher brand recollection than most other coffee. There is a slightly slanted view of the matter here. The writers are coffee aficionados who prize distinctive origin flavors in their coffee, which is rarely ...


3

I suppose you can if you can first make a decent coffee plant(s) to first make the coffee. Using this website can help you with your gardening/farming of coffee plants. It is mainly based in the USA so sorry! Some tips to notice for decent coffee beans: Don't put coffee plants in direct sunlight for too long. It will kill your plant and ruin your life. Most ...


3

The major standards are a bit confusing honestly. Fair trade provides a baseline above the commodities rates, but they don't ensure that the farmer is getting the most for their product. Furthermore, the farm has to be able to be certified for conforming to certain environmental conditions prior to being certified. Many coffee farmers are so far off the ...


2

There are brands that are as ethical from both a human and environment standard, but I don't know how the prices compare. Examples: Blue Bottle Coffee: Our coffee buyers proudly place a great amount of emphasis on quality and sustainability, both from an environmental and economic standpoint. We purchase a number of coffees from Fair Trade certified ...


2

There is a culinary notion of terroir adopted from the wine terminology which asserts that the specific characteristics of a environment and the stuff of the earth -- the substance -- does contribute greatly to agriculture. But it may take a good deal of investigation to discover which specific types of plants will really thrive. Call it the Homegrown ...


2

If you have enough space in a garden or you can rent a piece of community garden, you can consider setting up a greenhouse. As such, you can control the optimal environment for your plants and don't need to invade your living area.


1

The caffeine content of your coffee will depend on the variety, the method of extraction and the roast of your beans. You can see on this paper about caffeine contents of turkish coffee on table 7, that unroasted coffee releases almost no caffeine, while dark roast gives the best release. This article also has an interesting comparison on the caffeine ...


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