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4

I think you're talking about coffee bean chaff, it's pictured after roasting in this blog. These are blonde flakes the come off the beans during the roasting process. In most commercially sold coffee I've seen, the chaff has been removed. When I roasted my own coffee I didn't bother because it's not so easy to separate them from the beans and they are ...


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I roast with a Fresh Roast SR540 and most of the chaff comes off, but I have noticed that when I grind (for drip) there are light colored flakes as you have described. That is chaff that has stuck to the center cut of the bean. I, like you, was wondering what it was until I roasted some Kenya AA. The photo below compares the Kenya AA (top) Full City with ...


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Coffee brewing is simple physics and chemistry. In short, soluble compounds and oils migrate from the beans to the water. The extraction will depend on temperature, pressure and contact area between beans and water. There’s also a balance between desired and less desired flavor compounds (e.g. acidic and bitter) that a specific brewing method needs to manage,...


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When you use two filters instead of one, first a courser filter (metal) and then a finer filter (paper), you believe you are extending the life of the finer filter, but in reality you are doing the opposite. By only letting the finer particles reach the paper, what you are doing is actually clogging the paper faster, because all those very fine particulates ...


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These things can affect grind buyoancy: Roast level--lighter tends to be more buoyant due to greater retention of gasses during roasting Roast freshness--fresher roasts retain more gasses due to less time spent off gassing; this effect is compounded by roast level Grind freshness--fresher grinds retain more gasses due to less time spent off gassing Grind ...


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It is perfectly normal for the grounds to fall to the bottom relatively soon, even before pressing. In fact, you don't even need to press, you can just use the plunger as a strainer when you're done brewing. If your coffee tastes too sour, it is most probably underextracted. A weak ("light") body also hints at underextraction. To increase ...


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