Hot answers tagged

25

I have the same problem, and these things definitely reduce it: Grind more coarsely. Blade grinders are incapable of really doing this—they give you boulders and powder. But I've never been satisfied with the taste when I use coarse grounds— it's weak and lacks body. Make sure the screen fits well and no grounds are squirting along the sides Press gently, ...


16

In general, I argue that you shouldn't be able to re-use the grounds. That is, for any brewing session, your goal is to extract exactly what you want from the beans. If you do this optimally for your method and taste, there's nothing left in the beans that you want; re-extracting will give you a different result. The second brew might be drinkable and even ...


14

They are very good as de-odourizers, we use them in the kitchen and sometimes in a small perforated plastic container in the footwell of the backseats in our car. The fragrant smell lasts a long time also surprisingly. Also it seems to be useful in fridges too. That link lists the following: Deodourize fridge As a scouring agent A cheap varnisher Dye for ...


13

Are you using a burr grinder or a blade grinder? Blade grinders physically cannot give a consistent grind; you'll always have some too-fine (and some too-coarse) bits of beans. If you're having the beans ground where you buy them, have them done as coarse as the grinder will go and see if that helps. You can also try replacing the screen in your press. (...


11

Adding coffee grounds to a planting medium (e.g. soil) adds fatty acids, essential oils and nutrients that enrich soil which can help the growth of the plant and it may also affect the colour. One thing to be careful of is that some coffee grounds increase the acidity of the soil. However, I can't find anything indicating that it will affect the flavour of ...


10

Yes. Coffee grounds are simply the ground up seeds found inside the berry of the coffea plant, so eat up! Even after the beans have been ground and extracted into your favorite coffee beverage, they still contain plenty of caffeine and are perfectly digestible. Before people learned to brew coffee, folks were eating the beans to get that coffee boost. ...


8

I value sealed over opaque. Go for the sealed glass. Opaque is not really the goal, but rather in the dark. Keeping the stuff in a dark location, even in a clear container, will be fine. As far as priorities for storage in general, according to the USA National Coffee Association (and others including Blue Bottle and a lengthy missive from The Atlantic), ...


8

I am South Indian and this is a coffee producing region, but the typical local coffee in my home state is sold ground extremely fine and will pass through the metal mesh filter of a French press. Here is an "adjustment solution" that works very well for me when I try to brew finely ground coffee in a French press: after mixing the fine-grain coffee powder ...


8

As an avid composter I can say that I have always used lots of coffee grounds and my compost has always done well with it. There are a few reasons why it is beneficial: used grounds are fairly pH neutral. If your compost is too acidic they even help a little by absorbing extra acid. Unused grounds however would add to acidity. coffee grounds are considered "...


7

With a manual espresso machine, I have used the same grounds for two pulls. They are ok in a pinch if I want that volume but don't want to redo the grind, tamp etc. But honestly it is not as good as the first time through. The only thing I can suggest is that when I do them one after the other, it is ok. If I wait for the grounds to cool it is not really ...


6

Although the way plants digest food is very different to humans, the overall principle is the same: nutrients go in, and are completely broken down into very basic building blocks (amino acids, simple fats and sugars), and then rebuilt into whatever the organism needs. This is why we can eat plants, which are made of plant protein, and reassemble them into ...


6

If you're only brewing a cup at a time, just don't drink the last sip - the grounds will have settled and you won't like it. If you're brewing several cups at a time, then move it from the press into an insulated container - not only does this give the grounds a chance to settle out before they're in your cup, it'll keep the coffee fresh longer. I use an ...


6

There are a few elements to this answer, so I'll try to tackle them one by one. is it possible to brew another cup with the used grounds...? Yes. It is physically possible to do this. Just do what you described and voila, more liquid into the next mug. this would be the same as using more water and brewing over a carafe to brew twice as much coffee ...


5

Roaches love coffee. For someone living in a city a roach trap seems like a good solution (but I wouldn't recommend it from personal experience). I wouldn't use coffee grounds as fertilizer in house plants either for the same reason (see below). I live in NYC and roaches are a problem. The last thing you want is for roaches to tell their friends in ...


5

It sounds like you may be grinding the coffee a little too fine or your press may be bent out of shape. With a french press the grounds shouldn't pass through or around the screen, if they are make sure the screen is touching the sides of the cylinder all the way around and try a slightly courser grind.


4

My experience is that even if you grind precisely as you should there will always be coffee residue in the bottom of your cup. The only way to minimize this, assuming that you are grinding the coffee as you should, is to invest in a much better french press. I have good experience with e.g. Espro press which has two efficient micro-filters.


4

Brewed coffee ages like milk. As soon as it is brewed its flavor begins to degrade and deteriorate, which is why it always tastes much better freshly brewed. While you may not necessarily taste the difference from one pot to the next, it has definitely changed your overall expectation of the flavor. The bouquet of coffee also is very complex, as is ...


4

Try putting a couple of drops of water in your coffee beans before putting them in the grinder's hopper. Known as the Ross Droplet Technique.


3

I think this question has been satisfactorily answered for hot brewing, like in an Aeropress. I think it's worth adding that double-brewing is worth trying if you cold brew. I have recently tried double-brewing with my Filtron cold brewer, and found the results to be quite good. A single pound of coffee yields 2 liters of extract with this method, which I ...


3

I used to do this for a co-worker and me. We'd use three AeroPress spoonfuls of coffee (which is a lot) to make two cups. I think the theory was that the saturation of that much coffee grounds in the small amount of water that took up what little room was left in the AeroPress chamber, was not efficient at all. So we'd brew the same grounds twice. This made ...


3

Since you already probably tried to ajdust settings on a grinder, meybe the grinder is not good for French Press. Which grinder do you use?


3

The Grind The goal for grinding coffee is consistency of the grind, everything should be relatively the same size so it extracts evenly. In coffee grinding parlance, "boulders" is used to describe chunks and "fines" is used to describe microfine particles. When you introduce water (in any extraction method), the "fines" give up their flavor quickly, adding ...


3

I was at a new restaurant in my area the other day, and they had this ingenious little snack: Chocolate-covered coffee beans. The beans are left as they would be just prior to grinding them into grounds, and covered in a layer of chocolate, with a nice crunch to them. It's really as simple as it sounds. I've been working on finding them in local ...


3

What a great idea to make your own coffee candy. I've had both chocolate covered espresso beans as well as hard coffee candy from some local stores around my area. I prefer the hard candy because of the fact that I eat the former option way to quickly. Here's a great resource on how to make both a soft chewy coffee candy as well as a hard one: How to make ...


3

The reason is that your coffee grounds are too fine. Your Percolator needs coarser grains for various reasons: Allowing water trough it more easily – else the pressure needs to go too high and your coffee will taste burned as it is roasted a second time from the overheated filter basket [1]. Not allowing small small grounds to "whirl" up in the water and ...


3

I am a big fan of ignoring volumetric measures and using weight instead. Especially for a huge pot like this one, any old kitchen scale should be precise enough to allow a good dosage (for just a cup or two, you need more precision). The general recommendation for filter coffee is 60g coffee per 1000g water (And remember that 1000g =1kg = 1l.) As for ...


2

How about topping your cup with one of these metal fine filters, usually reserved for tea, when you pour in your cup? These filters are quite inexpensive, and a possible alternative to replacement parts or new devices.


2

It probably varies widely on what is in your compost pile. Some strains of bacteria are able to metabolize caffeine and would essentially break it down into other more useful compounds (to plants). However, without knowing what bacterium are in your heap and how much caffeine, it may be something of a dice roll.


2

This may sound a bit insane, but I've known ladies who will take the old grounds and, with the help of plastic wrap, apply them to cellulite trouble areas. It's only a temporary fix, but if it's something that bothers you, it's good for at least a night out.


2

I've tried using coffee grounds twice and obviously there is a quality and potency difference, if you just really want to stretch your coffee more than you can use less coffee per cup or if you are like me and just like the feeling of having a warm cup then reuse the coffee grounds twice but the second time around it better to brew it twice as long.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible