Hot answers tagged

6

I would follow the same guidelines as cow milk when using any alternative milk. For one you really just can't taste a liquid that is scalding hot, so you might as well not go so toasty. Other than that - If you think it tastes great, then keep doing that. If it smells less sweet, it probably is less sweet - you just gotta find that perfect sensory sweet spot....


6

The short answer is yes. The absence of the milk fats means that the foam will not "coagulate" as easily. The proteins chains in milk are polar: one end of the chain is hydrophilic (attracted to water), and the other is hydrophobic (repelled by water). Because milk is mostly made up of water, as soon as those proteins unfold, exposing their ends, ...


4

From experience it seems slightly easier and is less runny. The difference for me is pretty negligible with semi-skimmed vs. whole milk. Skimmed on the other hand always ends up quite watery for me, but that may have something to do with the way I'm frothing it.


3

I think the panarello is keeping the inner rubber tube in place, so it's normal for the tube to pop off under pressure. You can hold the tube in place by using a cable tie as can be seen in this video: Frothing milk for latte art with the De'Longhi Dedica EC685. However, that solution will make it difficult to remove the tube for cleaning. I suggest using a ...


2

It's just a matter of tradition, style and skill. Traditionally the thick, hard foam with bigger bubbles is used in Italy for Cappuccini. Same goes for espresso macchiato. Sometimes the milk foam is spooned on top of the espresso. In other countries they often imitated italian style coffee, which is why e.g. in Germany the foam is usually very thick as well. ...


2

Another difference is that the Aerocinno tends to produce firmer and longer-lasting froth compared to a wand. It's designed to provide a one-size-fits-all solution for consumers accustomed to automatic machines, whereas a milk wand requires more skill to use but allows for a lot more customization. Think of it like an automatic vs manual transmission. Note ...


2

The short answer here is that that device is not up to the job. Consider how microfoam is typically achieved in coffee shops compared to this device. Espresso shops use steam for a reason. Steam is a very effective mechanism for injecting both steam and air into milk while simultaneously agitating the milk. Your device, on the other hand, heats the milk from ...


2

TL;DR; Remove the outer panarello leaving just the inner steam tip. Turn the jug at a 45 degree angle and try to get the milk to spin round in a vortex. Detail: The panarello brings in extra air to make the frothing and steaming of the milk a much more consistent, reliable process. Unfortunately, from a latte perspective, the bubbles end up being too big and ...


1

The double wall on this steamer is not there for insulation. That idea doesn't add up. An exterior wall will heat up before an interior wall if heated on a stovetop and would inhibit transfer of heat to the interior container... I can think of two possible reasons for the double wall, but I must say, that double wall is an unnecessary added expense on the ...


1

The same question with answers is here: Pannarello wand on Delonghi Dedica EC685 for latte art The possible solution is to enlarge a bit output hole on the rubber wand.


1

Open the steam valve after it's heated up to release the built-up pressure. Then use it for steaming to avoid the rubber tip from shooting off due to high sudden pressures.


1

Ok - not having used one of these tabletop frothers, I don't really know how hot they actually get. But I suspect that the difference is down to the steam wand heating the milk more than your frother. The science behind it (vastly simplified is): Foam This comes down to how adept you are with a steam wand - initially you don't fully submerge the wand, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible