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18

Lots of questions! Starting from the top... Taste? Coffee cherries are mild in flavour and slightly sweet. The flavour is somewhat reminiscent of other red fruits, like a mild mix of fruits like raspberry, red mulberry, currant, cranberry, cherry, raisin. I've only had them dried, so they have a little bit of a "dried fruit" taste (e.g., as raisins are to ...


16

It is possible to grow coffee indoors. If allowed to grow as a tree they can reach 8 feet tall but if trimmed occasionally you can get the plant to grow more like a bush around 3-4 feet. This will change some based on the exact type. Coffee plants prefer shade with a couple hours of direct sunlight in the morning. Keeping it by a window should be about ...


6

I found this website which prescribes the following subtropic and equatorial growing conditions. The subtropical regions, at high altitudes of 16-24° (Illy, 21). Rainy and dry seasons must be well defined, and altitude must be between 1800-3600 feet. These conditions result in one coffee growing season and one maturation season, usually in the ...


4

In addition to the factors mentioned above, it has been shown that the growth and yields of coffee plants depends on shading levels. This is also important regarding the biodiversity and pest rate present in the area. Generally, the more biodiversity and different kinds of shade trees, there will be less harmful pests and better chances of surviving extreme ...


4

It all boils down to three questions: 1) Yield = How much did you get from the grounds? 2) Strength = How much ended up in the cup? 3) Ratio = What did you get there? Yield: Yield pertains to how much soluble you took from the coffee grounds. Ground coffee has something between 27-30% of its mass being soluble, that is, stuff you can dissolve in water. If ...


4

To me, a fresh ripe coffee cherry tastes like a rainier cherry, lychee, pear. Not as plump with fruit as a cherry, but similar size and rounder, and yes caffeine. The farmers we deal with will compost the outer fruit material, often let chickens peck around in it, and then they will use the compost on the farm as the soil needs the carbon material back to ...


3

They get sold for less money as "standard export" grade coffee. Because of NFC's marketing campaign, ANY sort of Colombian coffee ends up with higher brand recollection than most other coffee. There is a slightly slanted view of the matter here. The writers are coffee aficionados who prize distinctive origin flavors in their coffee, which is rarely ...


3

I suppose you can if you can first make a decent coffee plant(s) to first make the coffee. Using this website can help you with your gardening/farming of coffee plants. It is mainly based in the USA so sorry! Some tips to notice for decent coffee beans: Don't put coffee plants in direct sunlight for too long. It will kill your plant and ruin your life. Most ...


3

Many places with various climates do or could produce high quality beans. Guatemala, Peru, Ecuador, Hawaii, Jamaica, Kenya, Indonesia... the list goes on and on. Coffee is a fruit, a sort of cherry that can grow in wet or dry, temperate or cool climates. The climate of a location and the specific times of planting and harvest will affect the flavor of the ...


2

Sadly, the accepted answer by @Jose is incorrect. These days, "Fair Trade" guarantees pretty much nothing. As some researchers noted, the original idea of Fair Trade Coffee's long gone. For example, refer to Colleen Haight of the Stanford Innovation Review: The Problem with Fair Trade Coffee. The concept was adopted in 1988 to address the issue of so ...


2

As Jose Manuel Villasante Armas said, Fair Trade guarantees a minimum price for the farmers. Another good point is, it has local/provincial social supports. However, it does not care about environmental effects that much. UTZ certification or Rainforest Alliance are for that. They try to minimize the environmental impacts of coffee production. ...


2

We just got Cascara syrup in the store at the Starbucks where I work. It will be available to the public in just a few days. It tastes really good but it is exceedingly difficult to describe. It evokes memories of fruit compote that I had in Russia 20 years ago. It has some notes that remind me of hibiscus tea made with the whole fleshy flower. It is not ...


2

If you have enough space in a garden or you can rent a piece of community garden, you can consider setting up a greenhouse. As such, you can control the optimal environment for your plants and don't need to invade your living area.


2

According to two sources I have read [1, 2], it takes around 5 years for a coffee tree to reach maturity and it will then yield approximately one pound of beans per year. In further depth, fresh coffee beans should germinate within 2-3 months while old ones can take up to 6.


1

The climate regions close to the equator have the potential to have excellent coffee. This is especially true if there are areas with an elevation of around 1500 metres. You can read the details in, for instance, Hoffmann: The World Atlas of Coffee.


1

I think there are quite a lot of misconceptions about Fair Trade floating around here. There are several obvious key points addressed by the Fair Trade concept and several not so obvious points. There's also some discrepancy between what the Fair Trade company propagates and what actually happens to small scale coffee farmers. So I'll first summarize what ...


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