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A Moka grind is a tad coarser than espresso grind and ideally finer than standard pour over. If it’s too fine, you’ll see the excessive sediments or - worst case - even clogging up. The size of the largest particles in your first picture are French press or even cold-brew worthy: I can see the curved, smooth outside of the beans. If you also get sediments, ...


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To add to cabmeurer's answer, I think a big reason for the lower levels of acidity in your drip coffee when compared with other methods (pour-over, Aeropress, etc.) comes down to temperature. This post shows the results of sticking a temperature probe below the shower screen in a Cuisinart drip coffee machine similar to the one you have: when the water tank ...


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I have the answer! Like many others, the gasket (O-ring washer thing) on my trusty moka pot was starting to disintegrate after years of stove-top brews. I carefully checked the size I needed and ordered a pack off Amazon. After popping a new gasket in I got the sputtering, mostly steam, small fraction of a brew that so many others describe. Same scenario of ...


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Answering my own problem -- the coffee was just improperly stored. I have acidentally reproduced the perfectly same problem with other (good) beans (RIP, beans). I accidentally left them in an open bag overnight in a relatively wet environment. The result could not hold water again, with all side effects as with the original problematic beans (not really ...


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When brewing with 'batch' brew methods, you will always lose some of the nuance and clarity. And the quality of batch brewing machines mostly comes down to the heating element. The best ones I have personally used in cafes and at home is the Technivorm Moccamaster. However if you want to keep using your current machine there are few things you can keep in ...


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Generally, the "extraction" happens when the coffee is in contact with the water. So from the initial point of contact in this case the bloom phase pour till all the water (with dissolved solids) is removed from contact with the grounds. Technically speaking, The initial small quantity pour and stirring in your recipe is the bloom phase and the ...


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In general, aim for 2 to 2.5 times the amount of beverage in your cup to the used coffee. If you use 9g of coffee in, aim for 18-23g out. The brew time stays the same. If you compare a single basket to a regular double basket you can see that it's narrower at the bottom, this is intended to restrict flow so you have approximately the same brew time using the ...


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