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Espresso machines rely on pressure to extract coffee solutes over a very short (~25 seconds) extraction time. Tamping is a critical aspect to achieving this. By tamping ideally, you eliminate channels by which water might pass through the grounds. Elimination of those channels is important for two reasons. First, channels mean that water only touches some of ...


4

I'm not familiar with Costa, but I am with Starbucks. Let me offer my ideas in what's different. Starbucks stores use fully automatic espresso machines with semi automatic frothing wands. The espresso machines make true espresso, unlike all of the brewing options you mentioned. This is the main reason the coffee is better. The frothing wand also uses steam ...


4

It's not just your head! Different roast batches will benefit from different grind settings. In general, this is partly because different roast levels will result in beans that contain different compounds. This is because the heat or roasting causes chemical changes in some of the bean's compounds. On the other hand, roasting causes water in the bean to boil ...


3

There are a number of things to consider regarding these numbers. From a coffee perspective, it's important to note the difference between caffeine in the bean and caffeine in the coffee drink brewed from those beans. When you extract liquid coffee from grounds you extract some, but not all elements. Caffeine extraction, for example differs based on the brew ...


2

Flushing helps clear any residue that might be left inside the machine or grinds stuck to the group screen before pulling your next shot. It also helps bring the group head up to temp before you lock the portafilter, so your first bit of hot water doesn't get cold as soon as it hits your puck.


2

Return it. Forget about heavy metal poisoning. That's not a big concern. The bigger concern is that you'll never be able to clean inside those scratches. It'll make your brew taste terrible with time and use, and risk of disease (fungus in particular) will rise with time.


2

Reduce your dose. Having your puck stick to the brew head means the grounds are in contact with the brew head. If you reduce your dose by 1-2g the surface should be low enough as to avoid direct contact with the brew head. Depending on your brew head you might even get channeling if the surface is too high - immediately below the holes where water comes out ...


2

Reviews of the Melitta Molino indicate that the unit is not actually capable of achieving the very fine grind needed for espresso. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. Espresso grinders require very tight tolerances in manufacturing to enable the close proximity of burrs required for very fine grinding. This is why the vast majority of grinders made by ...


2

Your premise is incorrect -- they aren't actually very good at all. You just haven't had anything better to compare them with, and besides, this is a subjective opinion. The reason they are better than the coffee you're making at home, and more expensive, is primarily their investment in tools and training. They're using a much better coffee machine and ...


2

Coffee brewing is simple physics and chemistry. In short, soluble compounds and oils migrate from the beans to the water. The extraction will depend on temperature, pressure and contact area between beans and water. There’s also a balance between desired and less desired flavor compounds (e.g. acidic and bitter) that a specific brewing method needs to manage,...


2

I'm trying to narrow my focus for learning purposes so I can really develop a sense of how the process works regarding one specific kind of bean. That's a good way to start to learn the basics of your roaster, but keep in mind that other roasters will roast the bean differently, especially a tumble or hot air "popcorn" roaster. You'll learn more ...


2

To me, this sounds like channeling. When you brew espresso the machine pushes water through a puck of compressed coffee grounds. Ideally, the grounds are distributed equally throughout the puck so that the water passes through the puck evenly. In reality, there will always be small inconsistencies. These inconsistencies allow water to move through slightly ...


2

I think these are mostly marketing terms. What they're saying in those ads is that the machine has a pump that is able to provide 15 bar (or more on in some cases) of pressure. In practice, the pump pressure should be a bit more than the pressure you want to brew at so that you can reach and maintain that pressure when brewing. Having a stronger pump isn't a ...


2

The only thing you haven’t tried according to your list is genuine espresso with steamed milk. The standard coffee chain menu is based on espresso shots and steamed milk, in various ratios, and perhaps some flavor syrups. The coffees types you mentioned are all “thinner”, i.e. with a higher water-to-coffee ratio (the nespresso is probably closest to a true ...


1

For little bitterness you could try out some of those Ethiopian beans which have a berry-like taste.


1

For acidity, you want espresso made with a light roast. Caffes in the US generally don't serve this because it's not what people expect from coffee. "Dense", though, is a challenge. I'm not sure what you mean by this because espresso is mostly water. A nice layer of crema can create the perception of a heavy drink, but crema isn't dense. It's all ...


1

Instant coffee is coffee that has already been brewed then cooled and underwent a process that leaves only the solids. Instant coffee is usually made of cheaper robusta beans (high quality robusta beans also used in Italian espresso blends to give specific flavors). Robusta also has more caffeine content than Arabica, but instant coffee has less caffeine ...


1

The acidity level of brewed coffee is mainly influenced by three factors: Darkness of roast, with lighter roasts generally resulting in higher concentrations of acidic compounds and darker roasts resulting in lower concentrations Grind size, with finer grinds enabling greater extraction of acidic compounds (due to greater exposed surface area) and coarser ...


1

Answering my own problem -- the coffee was just improperly stored. I have acidentally reproduced the perfectly same problem with other (good) beans (RIP, beans). I accidentally left them in an open bag overnight in a relatively wet environment. The result could not hold water again, with all side effects as with the original problematic beans (not really ...


1

An espresso machine sends the water through the coffe grounds under high pressure, typically 9 bars. If you had an uncompacted bed of grounds, the water would just bore through on a path of least resistance (aka. channeling), leading to a very uneven extraction. A moka pot, on the other hand, only uses steam pressure to force water up through the coffee ...


1

Any Central American SHB is a good start. These beans provide familiar flavor profiles so you can better judge your own roasting skills, and they're pretty tolerant of a wide range of roast levels. Try hard beans from Guatemala, Colombia, etc., then just wing it branching out from there.


1

The reason that they are good is partly: training, consistency and practice; with quality ingredients. There are quite a few barista tells all websites with recipes, including Starbucks itself: https://athome.starbucks.com/site-map/ Starbucks YouTube Channel: "How to Make a Latte" https://delishably.com/dining-out/Starbucks-Drink-Guide-Lattes ...


1

This can happen if the gasket around the group head is damaged or worn out. Damage can occur if you overtighten the portafilter when locking it in place to brew, and wear occurs just by using the machine normally. Under normal use (once daily at least five days a week), a group head gasket will need to be replaced about every six months.


1

I think the other answers may not be responding to the question you asked. Beans are sometimes marketed as "espresso blends" based on the roasting quality (usually quite dark) and origin blends. Of course, preground espresso blends typically are sold very finely ground--perfect for espresso machines. If your "espresso blend" was ground ...


1

No There is no way of brewing espresso with a french press. Espresso is brewed under pressure, typically 9-10 bars. You cannot achieve this level of pressure no matter which brand your french press has. Additionally, the TDS (total dissolved solids) of espresso is around 8-12 while for french press coffee it's 1.4-1.7. However, you can get a cup of coffee ...


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No tamping Start tamping your coffee. Without tamping channels form a lot easier, making your shot pour a lot faster and making your coffee taste sour and bitter at the same time. If you still manage to get 11 bars of pressure somehow without tamping, I'd assume your coffee is ground way too fine anyways, making it even more likely to form channels since ...


1

In general, aim for 2 to 2.5 times the amount of beverage in your cup to the used coffee. If you use 9g of coffee in, aim for 18-23g out. The brew time stays the same. If you compare a single basket to a regular double basket you can see that it's narrower at the bottom, this is intended to restrict flow so you have approximately the same brew time using the ...


1

I ended up buying a generic portafilter which had the same measurements and shape and it worked fine. It cost me about 30 USD with shipping which was acceptable. I also saw some posts related to the isolation silicone ring inside the shower, so I also changed that (unscrewing it was difficult) and the machine is like new. As for the specifics: This is the ...


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