14

So I did a bit of research, and found a number of regional claims to 'egg coffee', including Swedish, Norwegian, Vietnamese and the American Mid-West. Of course I also found an article on Putting Weird Things In Coffee, which should be taken with a pinch of salt1. There seem to be a variety of approaches, but they seem to fall into three main camps: Add ...


8

I decided to give this a shot and made up a recipe myself: I started out by simply making a press pot of coffee: then, after letting the coffee cool and steep for a few minutes, mixed up and tempered two eggs (shell and all) by spooning in some of the coffee and grounds: This part starts to look pretty nasty, but persevere: Whip the eggs into an emulsion ...


5

Well, there is this website on Norwegian Egg Coffee. It is a a recipe on egg coffee, Norwegian style! Sadly, I am not a chef, but it only has 4 steps: Ingredients: 80 g coarsely ground coffee (roughly 200 mL) 1 egg 100 mL cold water 2.5 L boiling water 250 mL cold water Mix coffee with an egg and 100 mL cold water to a thick paste. You simply mix ...


4

I don't know any history behind the practice but I learned it myself during a rafting trip down the Grand Canyon back in the early '90's. The method was to put a couple of fistfuls of loose grounds in one of those giant porcelain coffee pots that look like they came out of a Zane Grey novel. Follow with two whole uncooked eggs and with a big metal spoon, ...


2

I think we can assume it's as safe as drinking eggnog. (eggnog a drink made from raw eggs, milk, spices and sometimes alcohol) I think the "level of safety" depends on which country you take the egg from. In some countries, eating an egg raw is safe, but in other countries it's not (like in Canada and United-States) Basically, I GUESS you wouldn't get sick ...


2

I am familiar with the use of eggshell only. The reason is for the benefit of calcium carbonate as has been mentioned before. It takes the bitter edge off coffee brewed using methods which do not provide proper extraction i.e. poor quality drip machines. The lack of proper extraction can make the coffee bitter or sour tasting. The egg shell removes those ...


2

It's an old cowboy campfire recipe. The egg helps to absorb the grounds to keep them out of your cup, but it also helps to neutralize the acidity of the coffee. I can't tell you where it originated, but I know that's how my German grandmother used to make it. It does make the coffee a lot smoother.


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