3

That looks very much like aluminum oxide, caused by exposure of aluminum to oxygen in the air. Don't worry. However unsightly it looks, it's not dangerous. You should be able to remove it with white vinegar or a solution of vinegar in water. Wet a soft cloth or soft-bristled brush with it and gently scrub.


2

Short answer is no, though you can use a common kitchen scale to minimize (but not eliminate) waste. Measure in grams if you're not already and if your scale supports it for greater precision. The basket on your pot has a fixed volume. Coffee within a particular roast batch will also have fairly consistent density. This means that you should be able to use ...


2

It is safe. If you clean it by either putting it in a dishwasher on a high temperature setting or sterilizing it with boiling water, you will be fine. This is not specifically a question about coffee but about food safety in general, so usual measures apply: Scrape off as much of the mold as possible Put the dish into (boiling) hot water for at least 15min ...


2

It sounds like your Keurig needs descaling (or a pin needle run through the hole in the puncturing point; especially if Hot-Chocolate was made). Also, I've found that if the machine was left on for hours prior to trying to make a cup it would not co-operate. Of course, the remedy being let it cool-down (for ten minutes or so).


2

I suggest using a small amount of bleach. Servings would be around 1 teaspoon to a gallon of water of course you can make this mix smaller. If you can smell the bleach you're most likely using to much, you also have to air dry the thing you use this trick on. This also works with lunch box's and pots. Feel free to try it out!😁 P.S This has worked for me ...


2

I just ran the WASH cycle (without detergent). A couple of notes and observations for the record: Took about 15 minutes to run. It would "brew" about 150ml of water every few minutes until the tank is emptied Once emptied it would not perform a rinse cycle with an additional tank like DESCALE does. Given the lack of a rinse cycle I suspect that ...


2

The dishwasher. Serious godsend for cleaning French press filters. Just make sure that the filter is flat inside the dishwasher. Standing it up might save space, but it also prevents a thorough cleaning because the water from the dishwasher jets doesn't hit the holes in the filter. If you don't have a dishwasher but do have a spray wand on your sink, try ...


1

I think there are two sides to cleaning a French press: the metal filter which may have some grounds stuck onto it and the bottom of the brewing vessel. To clean the metal filter, I unscrew the plunger and wash the metal parts that hold the filter with a bit of soap and water (or put them in the dishwasher). The metal filter is more difficult because there ...


1

It's a combination of scale (mineral deposits left behind by water left in the pot evaporating), oxidized aluminum (caused by exposure of aluminum to oxygen), and coffee deposits (coffee oils and solids left behind by evaporating brew / wet grounds). I've seen this with several aluminum pots when they get to be years old. Also steel if you don't keep up with ...


1

Failing other methods, use Barkeeper's Friend, a commercial general purpose cleaning product you can find in most supermarkets. It's a powder that you sprinkle on whatever needs to be cleaned, then add a small amount of water and scrub. This stuff works miracles on stainless steel and is the go to cleaner at many restaurants and bars. Buildup there can be ...


1

There’s a food safe degreaser called KrudKutter. Its the oil that sticks and stays. I’ve used it for glass carafes also. Spray, wipe and done. If it’s a tough buildup, do a few times. Works every time!


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