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Caffeine overdose is a real thing and one should be very careful, especially with caffeine pills. That being said, if you want to feel the effect of caffeine as soon as possible and that was your only goal, snorting would be the fastest, although it would feel disgustingly sticky and burn. If you want to do it by ingestion, your best bet is to avoid as much ...


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If you want the effects of the caffeine to be felt the most quickly, you probably should buy caffeine powder or pills, be careful though that you could easily overdose yourself to death with the caffeine powder or if you took more pills than recommended. Though, if you don't want to buy the isolated caffeine, drinking it would probably be quicker, since ...


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Of course, I assume that the same amount of coffee is used for both cups. In that case: No Caffeine dissolves very readily in water. The caffeine content in your cup is mainly and almost solely determined by the amount of coffee you use. The impact of any other factors such as amount of water, water temperature, and pressure are negligible. To get a rough ...


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The acidity level of brewed coffee is mainly influenced by three factors: Darkness of roast, with lighter roasts generally resulting in higher concentrations of acidic compounds and darker roasts resulting in lower concentrations Grind size, with finer grinds enabling greater extraction of acidic compounds (due to greater exposed surface area) and coarser ...


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How many are too many for a day depends on which you're using. As you suspect, different pods might have different levels of caffeine. Darker roasts tend to have less caffeine, while lighter roasts and flavored coffees likely have more caffeine. From what I can tell, it looks like Nespresso pods ought to vary between 50 and 150 milligrams per pod with the ...


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Milk doesn't affect caffeine effects. Adding milk can affect the time in which your body absorbs caffeine, it is extended, but you won't probably feel this. In 1997, scientists discovered that your nervous system won't be as stimulated (compared to drinking dark coffee) when you'll drink coffee with milk, but there won't be much of a difference in the ...


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Espresso does indeed extract more caffeine than other brewing methods except possibly Turkish (which I'm not familiar with). There are a few reasons why. Grind size is one: espresso's very fine grind size results in greater surface area of the beans compared to the grind sizes used for most other brewing methods. Two is pressure. The pressure with which ...


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Short answer: No Slightly longer answer: The temperature, pressure and method of brewing barely impact the amount of caffeine extracted from the bean. Because caffeine dissolves so readily in hot water, the single most important factor in determining the amount of caffeine in the cup is the amount of coffee used to prepare said cup. Arabica beans contain ...


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Because caffeine dissolves so readily in hot water, the single most important factor in determining the amount of caffeine in the cup is the amount of coffee used to prepare said cup. Arabica beans contain about 0.8-1.4% of caffeine by weight, depending on the variety. So if you were to brew an espresso (15g in 30g out) or a pour over (15g in 250g out), you ...


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