10

This is a pretty good way to ruin a burr grinder. Worst case scenario, your burrs jam up so much that they can't spin and burn out your motor. A blade could help, but I'd argue that the inconsistent grind you'd get wouldn't be much of an improvement in cup quality anyway. Realistically you'd end up with some of your grinds unchanged, some at the size you ...


6

No it's not a problem. Producers know that people at home often single dose their coffee, so I assume they consider that when producing a grinder (in fact most coffee shops that do pour over grind single doses as well). Maybe in some manuals it's written that you shouldn't let it run empty on very fine settings, but that's more to avoid warranty claims than ...


6

I wouldn't go so far as to say that it's not a very high-quality grinder, it does extremely well for the price. The clumping is an artifact of: Humidity Heat from grinding Type and roast of the bean Grinders that produce almost no heat while grinding, to the point that they do it reliably enough for it to be a listed feature cost ten times the amount that ...


6

With a blade grinder, yes. They already just chop the pieces smaller and smaller until you stop, anyway. With a burr grinder, it may be. But I make no promises that it won't clog the feeder. It's possible that the inflow may be greater than it can handle.


5

Yes, high end grinders are generally adjustable. Some even have macro and micro adjustments. For example the Baratza Vario grinder Hand grinders are also adjustable, and provide a good grind. See the Hario range The larger commercial grinders are sometimes aimed more at bulk output than at a precise and consistent grind. They grind the coffee very quickly,...


4

I recently purchased the Bonavita as well. After years of using basic automatic drip coffee makers this was an adjustment. I still haven't perfected the art of the cup using the Bonavita. The problem is that the Bonavita brews at the correct temperature, so I think you really need to be a little more precise when brewing (at least that's what I discovered). ...


4

It depends on "where" the squeaking is coming from. Two contact points that might squeak are the burrs themselves and the top part of the crank rod. The good news is that the whole thing dis-/re-assembles rather easily, and in fact this is pretty much necessary for changing the coarseness setting. I'd suggest two possibilities based on my own Hario manual ...


4

I would recommend looking for which coarse setting seems to produce the most even grind. Really, the only potential danger you have is grinding so fine that you can't push the screen down. The reason I recommend this is, like you mentioned, because everything else can be altered to your coffee's grind - the water temperature and extraction time. So you'll ...


4

From what I can tell, you're grind is rather coarse for a pour-over. You should have a grind the size of kosher salt for most drippers. Perhaps its personal taste, and I cannot argue that. However, it's typically recommended you start with this grind size and adjust to your preference. As far as my own experience both working as a barista for a few years, ...


4

The Problem with Consumer Burr grinders Burr grinders (that aren't of a very high or industrial quality) generally do not produce even grinds. I usually recommend a spinning blade grinder to the home barista for this reason. Evaluating Your Grinds You indicated that you will be using a drip machine with a paper filter. In my opinion, based on what I can ...


4

Yes. What you describe as a conical grinder is also known as a burr grinder. Burr grinders are important because they allow you to create ground coffee that is both homogenous and set to a specific granular size/coarseness. This is a key feature and selling point of these grinders and it easily allows the user to grind for espresso one moment and drip ...


4

Try putting a couple of drops of water in your coffee beans before putting them in the grinder's hopper. Known as the Ross Droplet Technique.


4

Hand grinders are usually very simple to disassemble. Read the instructions on this but most are fairly straightforward. Rice can be good but the starchy powder can get into places you can't clean. Here is a good link.. https://prima-coffee.com/learn/video/maintenance/how-clean-your-burr-grinder Here is another link... Look at the bottom of "detailed ...


4

There are products on the market that are made for just this purpose, two examples are: Grindz Coffee Grinder Cleaning Tablets White Capresso "Clean Grind" Grinder Cleaner But neither seem to have any better effect on cleaning my grinder than when I compare it to running parboiled rice*(not regular rice!) through it. *A word of caution, only use ...


4

There are two options. Get yourself some grinder cleaner (Grindz, Urnex and probably other brands), that you just grind through. You can buy it online. It cleans the burrs, removes oils and other residues. Afterwards you need to grind some beans so that you don't have the cleaner in your cup of joe. This is a rather convenient way to clean your grinder, ...


3

You will just have to find some form of compromise. I think the best way would be to empty the Hopper and then fill it with the new beans (also sometimes you might want to switch up the espresso?). You should figure out how your grinder behaves once it's getting more empty and with this knowledge you can quite easily adjust the extraction such that the ...


3

I asked a similar question and got back use a coarser grind to slow the extraction. I have a Capresso too and I am set in the middle of the Course section up to the right. I got a Bonavita 5-cup a week ago and I'm still playing around with it. I'm a big fan of metal reusable filters because I swear coffee made with paper filters had an odd taste.


3

Most high-end automatic grinders allow you to adjust for coarseness, not speed, as they're driven by a gear box that makes them operate consistently. This is important, because consistency allows you to produce exactly the same cup that you did previously by simply reproducing the grind / tamping / temp / etc. If you drink exotic beans, such as alamid, ...


3

The basic reply is "yes, that's possible". With a manual burr grinder. The thread warns well about the risks and shortcomings of electric devices for the job. A manual burr grinder allows to control the coarseness and the speed at which the ground gets through. This is how I do, luckily that is rare and usually in small quantities.


2

I have the Baratza Virtuoso myself, and I would stir the coffee up with a spoon in a separate vessel before distributing it into your portafilter. When distributing, generally lightly tapping the side of the portafilter with the palm of your hand until level - should break up anything thing remaining.


2

I have the Bonavita BV1900TS brewer with a Baratza Preciso grinder. I actually have two sets, one for work and one for home. I have pre-infusion enabled, if that matters in this case. I also have a VST refractometer that can measure the brewed coffee to determine its strength and also derive if it is too bitter or not. I have been able to get good ...


2

As an electrical engineer for any kind of such problems I can advise proper ground. I mean the electrical one this time. :) Anti static gloves may help (Google it). However, the static electricity always occurs by friction, it's natural and you cannot get rid of it completely.


2

I may have an idea. Put the new batch in a container that's easy to remove from the top and at the same time easy to observe. Maybe something like nylon stockings. When you see it touches the bottom, cut it with a knife from the top and remove the stockings. This way, the new batch of beans never mix with the old ones until the last moment you remove the ...


2

If I were you I'd go with the baratza encore (or something similar). It will do just fine for a pressurised basket and it's great for filter too (if James Hoffman uses it for his filter it's good enough for you and me). Don't buy a blade grinder, I've made that mistake. You will taste a huge difference between the two, the blade grinder being bitter and ...


1

It could be your grinder, grind settings make a huge difference in flavor. You would be surprised what a notch or two on your grinder will do. Or it could also be your beans. You mentioned they are a medium roast.The darker in roast you go the more it adds "roast" flavors to the beans. Maybe try going for a lighter roast?


1

I have a new Bonavita 1900 and I had a devil of a time dialing it in. However, I'm now getting good coffee so I'll explain what I've done. My problem, like yours, was bitterness so my first step was to increase the weight of the coffee grounds to 85gms (for 8 cups) to reduce the extraction. This helped a little but it was still bitter, so at that point I ...


1

I purchased one of the Bonavita 1900 TS brewers for my Dad for his birthday, while I still use a 12 cup Cuisinart with thermal carafe at home. We have identical grinders for home use. What I have found is that he uses significantly less grounds to make a pot of coffee. While I will use 8-8.5 scoops in an 8 cup pot on the cuisinart (about 7.5g per scoop) ...


1

I have the same grinder, and I find that the static builds up more with the amount you grind. For everyday AeroPress use, I don't grind enough per use for it to build up static, but when I cold brew a whole 12oz of coffee, I grind the whole bag in batches. This builds up a lot of static due the the bin being plastic, and it's annoying to clean as it flies ...


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