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Brewing is a part of every coffee preparation method: it's the time when the water (or steam) is in contact with the grounds. It is a generic term. Percolation however, would only be used when making percolator coffee. You would not talk about percolation time when making espresso, for example. I would not use it as a generic term.


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Sure you can. Get, for example, a PR2 robot and program it accordingly. You can also use simpler robots, but in all cases, you will either end up with a ridiculous amount of cost, or with a very unreliable performance. Not mentioning the hours of programming time you will have to spend on the project. You may be better off buying a coffee maker that you can ...


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As discussed further in this question about bitterness, degree of extraction is one significant factor in bitterness in your cup. There are a couple of other links to coffee bitterness in that question also. Keeping other major factors constant (e.g., same temperature of water, same beans), time and grind level are the easiest to modify to reduce bitterness....


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In the world of coffee, the two terms are basically interchangeable - as long as you are talking about water passing through coffee, and that it is also being passed through some sort of filtration. Percolation by definition is the extraction of a substance by passing water through it. Your brew time would be the time that your water is in contact with your ...


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Is it, by any chance, demineralised/distilled water, with no minerals added back in? Aside from temperature (which you should check - it's OK if it's cooler, but too cool is no good, and knowing the temperature will help you modify other parameters), it's important to have high quality, odour-free water that is free from impurities and that has the correct ...


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The comment on the Moka pot I believe has a bit more complex answer than what you are indicating. Moka Pots are almost more similar to an espresso brewing method than a french press or a pour over system. Water very near boiling is forced through a coffee puck at some level of increased pressure which brews your coffee. Just looking at the mechanical ...


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In a stove top coffee maker the water is boiled in the lower chamber, the steam pushes the water at low pressure upwards through the grounds before reaching the upper chamber, let's call it decanter. So the water is in contact with the grounds only once. Due to the high temperature there is arguably over extraction happening. In terms of flavor you can tell ...


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You have everything right. If you want Extraction % you need to measure: Total dissolved solids: You will have to measure this using a refractometer. There are many out there, for commercial settings they start at around 300€. I have no experience with cheaper, "home use" refractometers but I'd assume they lack accuracy. Dry coffee mass (in g): You have to ...


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Absolutely not! The Nescafé is not coffee in the sense of coffee beans, ground, ready for brewing. It’s instant coffee, which means coffee was brewed and then freeze-dried. The resulting granules can then be put in hot water to create a coffee drink (although some fundamentalist would dispute the claim that the result qualifies as “coffee”, but I digress). ...


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Based on your comment on the question, you are referring to compacting ground coffee in the portafilter. This process is referred to as tamping when making espresso. The widely-accepted amount of downward force to use when tamping a standard double shot of espresso is 30 lbs. You can view a source here but if you simply do a google search for "espresso ...


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Agreed with the above answer by Jason: it's about taste. That said, of late i have been surprised by how effective for extractin Scott Rao's 97degree C is for a pour over[link].In particular it seems that central and south american beans need the temp to get out the flavour - african's less so but still work in that range. But to your question - a more ...


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The extraction percent of coffee could be calculated with a Petri dish, stove and a precision scale, if you don't have access to a refractometer. I assume, the original question here is: How does one calculate extraction percent? If this is the question, the answer is simply a refractometer as it directly reads the extraction percent. However, the main ...


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Many variables, all have effects. Find the ones that result in coffee you like, and don't get too concerned with it. I have been using a french press exclusively for several months now. I don't particularly like bitter coffee - but I also don't use water nearly as hot as is common with other methods (or pretty much required for them to move water at all, in ...


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I think you are attempting to brew with water that is way too cold. To me, this is the elephant in the room in your question. Though it's only an anecdote (until you measure your water temperature!) I myself measured the "very hot" water taps from a filter machine and from a hot water dispenser in my office: one was 75°C and one was 85°C. The latter is ...


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I typically clean with vinegar and water but may I make a suggestion... ditch the Keurig!! I have heard that if you overfill custom k-cups grounds can get pulled into the water supply lines that may be a problem, but I will be honest, I feel like Keurig brewing methods significantly degrade the flavor of your coffee. I will admit that I own one, but I ...


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You need to descale the entire path of the water takes. Our office Keurig suffers the same symptoms occasionally. When they occur, we use the Keurig descaling solution and the instructions located on the Keurig Website. You may be able to use vinegar and water if the instruction for your model state that it's OK.


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Robot: consisting of - a coffee maker you fill with water and coffee the night before, an outlet, wired to a switch by your bed. Wake up, flip switch, done. Robot: consisting of - a pot of cold-brewed coffee or coffee concentrate (and a microwave if you want it hot). Robot: consisting of - an alarm clock by your bed, and a normal automatic timer-operated ...


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In an academic article (in English language and authored by two Italian authors) espresso preparation is divided into these three steps: Grinding of the roasted coffee Coffee powder dosing and tamping Brewing (more correctly Percolation) In the rest of the document, percolation is preferred. According to this, Eric's first hypothesis in his question about ...


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To me a percolator is a just a mechanism. You have a heater at the bottom, a tube, and a check value. The water enters the tube and some of the water is vaporized and it pushes the hot water to the top. They have no pump. That style of coffee maker is called a percolator. From there the term got used a lot ways.


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