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You absolutely want to be able to choose grind size - even if you have a preferred brewing method and beans, you still want to be able to make some adjustments up or down if necessary. Even more so if you are going to experiment with brewing methods, where the required grind size ranges from super fine powder (Turkish Mokka) to coarse grain (cold brew). And ...


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I think you're talking about coffee bean chaff, it's pictured after roasting in this blog. These are blonde flakes the come off the beans during the roasting process. In most commercially sold coffee I've seen, the chaff has been removed. When I roasted my own coffee I didn't bother because it's not so easy to separate them from the beans and they are ...


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It's not just your head! Different roast batches will benefit from different grind settings. In general, this is partly because different roast levels will result in beans that contain different compounds. This is because the heat or roasting causes chemical changes in some of the bean's compounds. On the other hand, roasting causes water in the bean to boil ...


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Your thoughts are neither new nor unheard of. Coffee as a product has always been a luxury item in most parts of the world, so consumers have been creative in finding substitutes for the real deal from the start. They were and still are prepared both at home and sold as commercial products. There are also coffee-and-substitutes mixes, stretching the yield of ...


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I roast with a Fresh Roast SR540 and most of the chaff comes off, but I have noticed that when I grind (for drip) there are light colored flakes as you have described. That is chaff that has stuck to the center cut of the bean. I, like you, was wondering what it was until I roasted some Kenya AA. The photo below compares the Kenya AA (top) Full City with ...


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Reviews of the Melitta Molino indicate that the unit is not actually capable of achieving the very fine grind needed for espresso. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. Espresso grinders require very tight tolerances in manufacturing to enable the close proximity of burrs required for very fine grinding. This is why the vast majority of grinders made by ...


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Oily surfaces are related to roast level I don't think oily beans are related to roasting time as you say in your question. Instead, oily beans are characteristic of a darker roast. Roasting levels are primarily related to the internal temperature of the beans, the higher the internal temperature of the bean, the darker the roast. Wikipedia has an overview ...


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